Parvo virus - Chihuahua Forum : Chihuahua Breed Dog Forums
 
Chihuahua Forum : Chihuahua Breed Dog Forums


Chihuahua-People.com is the premier Chihuahua Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.

Go Back   Chihuahua Forum : Chihuahua Breed Dog Forums > Chihuahuas > Chihuahua articles

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-26-2005, 08:19 PM
chi god/godess
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 7,716
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Parvo virus

here's some info i collected on parvo:

Prior to 1977-78, parvovirus did not exist in the dog. The virus is a
close relative of feline panleukopenia (feline distemper) and in fact,
may have mutated from the cat and infected the dog in the late 1970s.
The virus is extremely hardy and survives for long periods outside its
host. The virus will live in the environment up to 6 months and survives
winter nicely under a blanket of snow where the temperature is usually
around 25-28 degrees F. Extremely cold temperatures prior to snow fall
will kill the virus. Sodium hypochlorite (bleach) is the only effective
disinfecting agent.

The virus is transmitted by oral ingestion of viral contaminated feces.
Upon ingestion by the new host it infects local lymph nodes, quickly
multiplies and then via the blood moves to the small intestine where
signs of the disease begin in approximately 5-6 days. The normal incubation period (time from exposure to the virus to the time when signs of disease appear) is from 7-14 days. Active excretion of the virus in the feces can begin the third day after exposure, often before clinical signs appear, and may last for one to two weeks after the onset of the disease.
The virus is
extremely deleterious to the lining (mucosa) of the small intestine. The
surface of the mucosa is stripped away upsetting crucial barriers and
interfering with normal balance of digestive enzyme secretion and
nutrient absorption. Additionaly, the normal bacterial flora of the small
intestine which aid in digestion are now exposed to ulcerated mucosa,
providing a direct route into the blood stream. Fluid loss from both
vomiting and diarrhea is dramatic and dehydration ensues. The onslaught
of bacteria and toxins into the blood will ultimately cause death.
Precipitous drops in white blood cell (WBC) counts are common and relate
directly to the prognosis and outcome of the infection. Ominous drops in
white blood cells are attributed to overwhelming degradation of WBCs and
the direct depressive viral effect on WBC production in the bone marrow.


The incidence of the disease is highest in young dogs and tends to start
some time after the puppy has lost its maternal protection passed on at
birth with the first milk (colostrum). Any age can be infected but, most
dogs are infected between the ages of 2-6 months when maternal antibody
decreases below a protective level in the puppy. Signs of the disease
usually are mild to nonexistent. However, a full blown case of parvovirus
untreated can easily be fatal. Certain breeds seem to be more sensitive
to the disease; possibly related to their immune system. They include
rottweilers, Doberman Pinschers, and possibly black Labrador retrievers.

Generally, a diagnosis is made on the signs of the disease and falling
white blood cell counts. Good rapid diagnostic tests are also available
at veterinary clinics. Additionally, the virus can be found in the feces
by commercial labs using electron microscopy.

Treatment for the disease is primarily supportive although recently
immunotherapy has become important. Historically, dogs were supported by
aggressive intravenous fluid therapy to combat hydration and antibiotics
given to reduce secondary bacterial infection. Food is withheld until
vomiting has ceased. Many veterinarians employ antiemetics to lessen the
signs and aid in the control of dehydration. Blood transfusions have been
employed to increase the level of globulins, red blood cells and serum
protein being lost via the bowels bloody diarrhea. Most recently,
antitoxins and antiparvo serum are showing results. With hospitalization
and vigorous support most dogs will survive severe cases of parvo virus.
Early detection and aggressive therapy are the key to success.

Prevention of parvo virus is by vaccination. Modified live vaccines are
the most effective and continue to be safe. Producing and effective level
of protection requires frequent vaccination starting at 6 weeks of age
and repeating every 3-4 weeks until the puppy is sixteen weeks old. Some
investigators have suggested extending the protocol until 20-26 weeks
because of the persistence of maternal antibody in the puppy which
neutralizes the vaccine. Currently, annual revaccination is recommended.
Recently, it has been suggested that repeated annual vaccination may also
produce persistent antibody interference to the vaccination. After the
initial puppy series and first annual revaccination, boosters in the
future may be recommended triennial or less frequent. A change in
vaccine protocol, until further research is done, is not recommended.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~

disinfectiong info and other tidbits:

If you've recently lost a dog to Parvo, veterinarians recommend that you wait six months to a year before putting a new puppy or non-vaccinated dog in to an infected environment (even if you have disinfected it). To immediately bring an animal into a situation where one has recently died of Parvo is a virtual death sentence for the new puppy. Common sense and regular visits to the veterinarian can save your dog's life.

Parvovirus can persist in the environment for long periods. It is important to clean up after an infection. Washing the animal's area with bleach and water in a 1:30 dilution will kill the virus. The bowls should be thrown away and the bedding either bleached or thrown away to prevent further spread of the infection. Discard all feces from the infected dog. Humans can also spread the disease on their hands if they touch feces from an infected dog and then touch a puppy without washing properly. Very small amounts of fecal material on the dog's coat can contain large numbers of viral organisms and can easily be transmitted to a susceptible dog.
__________________
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2  
Old 05-26-2005, 09:46 PM
chi king/queen
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Southern California
Posts: 936
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Thaqt's really good info. Thanks so much I was wondering what Parvo was.
__________________


Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-26-2005, 09:54 PM
chi god/godess
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: England
Posts: 9,271
Thanks: 0
Thanked 5 Times in 2 Posts
Send a message via Yahoo to OzzyAndLilysMom
Default

Brilliant thanks
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
 
  #4  
Old 05-28-2005, 10:09 PM
chi king/queen
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 825
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Thanx very much for that article. I didnt know a thing about parvo.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-28-2005, 10:12 PM
chi god/godess
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 7,716
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

your welcome
__________________
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-29-2005, 12:29 AM
chi lover
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Quebec city, Canada
Posts: 148
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Send a message via MSN to Armando... Send a message via Yahoo to Armando...
Default

thanks....that's a very good article....the vets here in Qc don't usually vaccinate against parvo but i know that if I want to go to El Salvador, they need to have that vaccine, otherwise they'd get quarantined.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-06-2005, 12:25 PM
chi god/godess
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 7,716
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

here's a little more from another article:

There are several symptoms of Parvo. If your dog or puppy has contracted the Parvo virus you will notice:

High fever
Depression
Diarrhea
Vomiting
Lethargy
Uninterested in food and treats
Foul-smelling, liquid stool that is sometimes yellow in color
Most people will begin to notice that their puppy seems "under the weather" or tired, a few hours later you may notice the dog is uninterested in food, water, treats, toys, etc. The puppy will have a high fever and most people notice vomiting or foul-smelling liquid stools.
__________________
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-05-2005, 06:51 AM
chi-aholic
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: canada
Posts: 402
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Reading this has scared the bejeepers out of me! I dont feel like I can take my dog anywhere safely!
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT. The time now is 03:40 AM.



Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright 2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.5.2
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Chihuahua People 2004-2009
PetGuide.com
Basset Hound Forum Doberman Forum Golden Retriever Forum Beagle Forum
Boxer Forum Dog Forum Pit Bull Forum Poodle Forum
Bulldog Forum Fish Forum Havanese Forum Maltese Forum
Cat Forum German Shepherd Forum Labradoodle Forum Yorkie Forum Hedgehog Forum
Chihuahua Forum Retriever Breeds Cichlid Forum Dart Frog Forum Mice Breeder Forum