Got a question - Chihuahua Forum : Chihuahua Breed Dog Forums
 
Chihuahua Forum : Chihuahua Breed Dog Forums


Chihuahua-People.com is the premier Chihuahua Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.

Go Back   Chihuahua Forum : Chihuahua Breed Dog Forums > Chihuahuas > Chihuahua Questions

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-10-2010, 05:32 PM
chi god/godess
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Name: Pam
Location: Bakersfield, CA
Posts: 3,686
Thanks: 0
Thanked 21 Times in 20 Posts
Default Got a question

I took Reggie to the vets yesterday to get his first set of shots. The vet now puts his age at about 4 years old. Boy, he aged fast. She said that she can feel only one descended testicle, but that it was a bit hard to examine him due to his sore leg. My question is with a retained testicle, after being neutered, will he act as "stud-ly"? Is there a chance of cancer if it is left? I know that he would not be able to impregnate with it up in his body. I have never had this happen before.

Last edited by svdreamer; 03-10-2010 at 05:35 PM.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2  
Old 03-10-2010, 05:58 PM
chi god/godess
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Boston
Posts: 3,403
Thanks: 12
Thanked 40 Times in 34 Posts
Default

It is not unheard of to have an un-desended testicle. usually when they neuter, they vet goes up in to the groin and takes it. It does make the neuter a bit more complicated. A few here have had this situation. Hope they chime in..
__________________
Rubia -y mi perrito que Rico
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-10-2010, 06:03 PM
chi god/godess
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: hampshire uk
Posts: 1,134
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Default

If he is 4 years old then if he acts like a little stud now it is very unlikely neutering him will make any difference as he will most likely act the same after he really is too old for that to change with neutering.....Also a retained testicle does not mean that he will be infertile and there is a high chance he could still make babies as only the retained one is sterile the one that has dropped is just as likely to be in full working order.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
 
  #4  
Old 03-10-2010, 06:09 PM
chi god/godess
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Name: Pam
Location: Bakersfield, CA
Posts: 3,686
Thanks: 0
Thanked 21 Times in 20 Posts
Default

Thank you for your replies. Yeah, I realize that descended one would be fertile. I do plan on neutering him. I didn't know if they would take the one that is undescended out or leave it and if it would cause problems down the way.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-10-2010, 07:51 PM
chi god/godess
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Name: Tracy
Location: Wichita, KS for 26 years... just moved to UTAH!
Posts: 14,441
Thanks: 415
Thanked 426 Times in 299 Posts
Default

Retained testicles are a very high cancer risk. It will be removed at the same time he is neutered. It does make the surgery a bit more complicated, but needs to be done.
__________________

"Having heard all of this, you may choose to look the other way.....
but you can never say again that you did not know." William Wilberforce 1759-1833
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-10-2010, 08:27 PM
Jerry'sMom's Avatar
chi god/godess
 
Join Date: May 2009
Name: Therese
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 7,558
Thanks: 12
Thanked 15 Times in 13 Posts
Default

Jerry had one in the stealth mode... It's why he couldn't be a show dog. When he was neutered
they made two incisions and took out both the descended and the un...
__________________
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-10-2010, 08:34 PM
chi god/godess
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Name: Pam
Location: Bakersfield, CA
Posts: 3,686
Thanks: 0
Thanked 21 Times in 20 Posts
Default

Ok, thanks so much for the info. I wasn't sure what they did. Reggie's leg is getting better, he actually trotted a bit yesterday. But I can't get him fixed until it is much better as they need to position him with his back legs spread. So, hopefully soon, we will be able to get this done.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-10-2010, 08:41 PM
Tink's Avatar
chi god/godess
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Name: Ronni
Location: Nashville Tennessee
Posts: 2,206
Thanks: 51
Thanked 134 Times in 103 Posts
Default

The condition of undescended testicles is called cryptorchidism. Here's some info on the condition:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

What is cryptorchidism?
Cryptorchidism is the medical term that refers to the failure of one or both testes (testicles) to descend into the scrotum.

If the testicles aren't in the scrotum, where are they?
Most cases of cryptorchidism are the result of the testicle being retained in the inguinal canal or in the abdomen. In cases of inguinal cryptorchidism, the testicle may sometimes be felt underneath the skin inside the groin region. In cases of abdominal cryptorchidism, the testicle cannot be felt from the outside. Abdominal ultrasound or radiographs may be performed to determine the exact location of the retained testicle.

What causes cryptorchidism?
The testes normally descend into the scrotum by two months of age. In certain dogs, it may occur later, but rarely after six months of age. Cryptorchidism may be presumed to be present if the testicles aren't palpated in the scrotum after two months of age. Cryptorchidism is reported in all breeds, but the toy breeds, including toy poodles, Pomeranians, and Yorkshire terriers, are at higher risk. Approximately seventy-five percent of the cases of cryptorchidism involve only one retained testicle while the remaining twenty-five percent involve failure of both testicles to descend into the scrotum. The right testicle is more than twice as likely to be retained as the left testicle. Cryptorchidism affects approximately 1.2% of all dogs. The condition is thought to be inherited although the exact mechanism is not fully understood.

What are the clinical signs of cryptorchidism?
This condition is rarely associated with pain or other clinical signs, unless a complication develops. In the event of a complication, such as spermatic cord torsion (twisting onto itself), there will signs consistent with sudden and severe abdominal pain. Most often any clinical signs are associated with neoplasia or cancer.


What is the treatment for cryptorchidism?
Neutering and removal of the retained testicle is recommended as soon as your veterinarian feels it is safe for the dog to undergo surgery. The procedure normally involves making a second surgical approach over or near the retained testicle. If the retained testicle is intra-abdominal, the second incision will be usually be made along the midline of the abdomen. In effect, your dog will undergo two surgical procedures for neutering instead of one.

What if I don't want to neuter my dog?
There are two good reasons for neutering a dog with cryptorchidism. The first is to remove the genetic defect from the breed line. Since cryptorchidism is an inherited defect, dogs with this condition should not be bred. Second, if the retained testicle is left in the body, the chances are increased that the dog will develop a testicular tumor (cancer) in the retained testicle. The risk of developing testicular neoplasia is estimated to be approximately ten times greater in dogs with cryptorchidism than in normal dogs. In fact, 53% of all Sertoli cell tumors and 36% of all seminomas occur in retained testicles. Additionally, 36% of all spermatic cord torsions are found in dogs with cryptorchidism.

What is the prognosis for a dog with cryptorchidism?
The prognosis is excellent for dogs that are diagnosed and undergo surgery early. The surgery is relatively simple and the outcomes are overwhelmingly positive. The prognosis for dogs that develop testicular neoplasia is guarded to poor and depends on the specific type of tumor and the dog's overall health at the time of diagnosis.
__________________
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT. The time now is 07:21 AM.



Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright 2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.5.2
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Chihuahua People 2004-2009
PetGuide.com
Basset Hound Forum Doberman Forum Golden Retriever Forum Beagle Forum
Boxer Forum Dog Forum Pit Bull Forum Poodle Forum
Bulldog Forum Fish Forum Havanese Forum Maltese Forum
Cat Forum German Shepherd Forum Labradoodle Forum Yorkie Forum Hedgehog Forum
Chihuahua Forum Retriever Breeds Cichlid Forum Dart Frog Forum Mice Breeder Forum