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Has any one adopted a fear biting dog? is it hard to over come??


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We haven't adopted a fear biter but we have one. Matilda (our very first Chi) was socialized like crazy as a pup. Still, she began growling & nipping at 11 weeks of age. We tried for MONTHS to socialize her out of it & were never successful. :( She is a wonderful Chi but is afraid of a lot of things (thunder, riding, plastic bags) but her biggest pet peeve is stranger contact. She is great walking around town & around people & other dogs but the second someone reaches for her she'll try to run & hide. If she was cornered & approached she WOULD bite. Vet visits are not fun with her & the last visit she had to be muzzled after she almost bit the vet in the face, pooped all over her & nearly dove off the exam table (I happened to be very quick catch her). She now has an Rx for Xanax to take before going to the vet. It makes me sad but she lives a happy life...with limitations. If we have small kids around I'll put her away. When the girls have friends over they have strict instructions to let her come to them & to not EVER try to pick her up.

She will come to strangers after she's comfortable with them but rarely lets anyone pat her. Only a select few are able to. She has met a couple kids she's been comfortable enough letting pet her...not sure what it is about them that she likes but it's always a great feeling when she trusts someone new. :)

So yes, for some it is EXTREAMELY difficult to overcome it. We never were able to. Not saying with some it can't be done but for us we tried & it only got worse. I've recently found out that Matilda's mom is the same way (which is extreamely frustrating--I'd NEVER breed a dog with such severe fear aggression) so sometimes a big part of it has to do with genetics.

Anyway, that's our situation. Some Chi's may have just been poorly socialized & in those cases I think it would be easier to bring them out of it. But the cases where it's more genetic--I've not found anything that works.
 

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I saw her, shes super cute. Dont decide without meeting with her and talking to whoever evaluated her. BUT, my fiance adopted a very fearful dog from the humane society, before we met, when the dog was about 10 months old. In the three years that he had him, he bit 5 or 6 different people (roommates, friends, his brother) including me, three times. He was a lab, border collie, dalmation mix, about 70ish lbs. Every time he bit, he broke the skin, our friend has scars on his nose, and I have scars on my leg and in the palm of my hand, that bite needed stitches. Basically, a fearful dog is MUCH harder to help than one who is just plain aggressive. We worked with a number of trainers to try to help him. I should add that he attempted to bite me many, many more times, he just succeeded three times. He was afraid to go for walks, he was afraid to leave Drews (my fiance) room, he was afriad of new people, loud sounds, something different in the room, and even going outside. He was afraid of the kitchen, so he would only go out in the front yard, with Drew, or eventually, with me, and he shook the whole time. He peed when he was scared too, if you tried to take him outside for a walk, or into the kitchen, or even out of his room sometimes, he peed everywhere. If he was really really scared, he would poop. It was an involuntary thing, it just speaks to how very very frightened he was. Anyway, I could go on and on, in the end, Drew made the incredibly painful decision to have him put down. I would never want a dog who was that fearful again. Not only was he dangerous to us and to our guests, he was totally crippled by fear and had little quality of life. Also, Drew wasnt really able to enjoy him the way you should be able to enjoy a dog. He couldnt take him anywhere, and its hard to have a dog that NO ONE but you likes, because only Drew got to see the good side of him.
On the other hand, a chihuahua who bites is a much less serious problem than a 70 lb dog who bites. And that was just our experience. But it takes an incredible amount of time and patience, and its very slow going progress wise. Riley did get a little better, but not enough. Now, she may not be that bad, and its entirely possible that she could improve. Also, sometimes, animals behave very differently in shelters due to the stress than they would in the real world. Just be prepared to work really hard to help her. Fiddle would probably be helpful to her too. Im not saying dont do it, she may not be anything like Riley was, just go in with your eyes open.
Maybe someone else has had a more positive experience :)


Add- Just saw that you asked about with other dogs...often other dogs, outside of our household, disliked him bc they could tell he wasnt quite right, other male dogs often attacked him in fact, but we never had a problem with him being unkind to other dogs. Our roommate at the time had a weim/boxer x and we had Reese, and they all got on really well. Reese actually really liked Riley, and Riley always played really nicely with him from the time we got him at 3 months
 

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We haven't adopted a fear biter but we have one. Matilda (our very first Chi) was socialized like crazy as a pup. Still, she began growling & nipping at 11 weeks of age. We tried for MONTHS to socialize her out of it & were never successful. :( She is a wonderful Chi but is afraid of a lot of things (thunder, riding, plastic bags) but her biggest pet peeve is stranger contact. She is great walking around town & around people & other dogs but the second someone reaches for her she'll try to run & hide. If she was cornered & approached she WOULD bite. Vet visits are not fun with her & the last visit she had to be muzzled after she almost bit the vet in the face, pooped all over her & nearly dove off the exam table (I happened to be very quick catch her). She now has an Rx for Xanax to take before going to the vet. It makes me sad but she lives a happy life...with limitations. If we have small kids around I'll put her away. When the girls have friends over they have strict instructions to let her come to them & to not EVER try to pick her up.

She will come to strangers after she's comfortable with them but rarely lets anyone pat her. Only a select few are able to. She has met a couple kids she's been comfortable enough letting pet her...not sure what it is about them that she likes but it's always a great feeling when she trusts someone new. :)

So yes, for some it is EXTREAMELY difficult to overcome it. We never were able to. Not saying with some it can't be done but for us we tried & it only got worse. I've recently found out that Matilda's mom is the same way (which is extreamely frustrating--I'd NEVER breed a dog with such severe fear aggression) so sometimes a big part of it has to do with genetics.

Anyway, that's our situation. Some Chi's may have just been poorly socialized & in those cases I think it would be easier to bring them out of it. But the cases where it's more genetic--I've not found anything that works.
Woah,

Thanks so much for replying and sharing! Yes I read when I was puppy hunting that Chi's are the only dogs that inherit temperment or something along those lines, thats why it was very important to meet the rents.

Fiddle bites now but it is play biting when we are mucking about (We were trying to get rid of all bite inhibition but my partner always encoraged it during play, so we only got her to the point of soft biting)

As this is a rescue I wouldnt know if it was a genetic thing or just from experience. How is she with you? Is she still timid/biting around you? or just new people?

Also, does this affect her behaviour in the pack? (I would simply DIE if anything happened to Fiddle)
 

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I saw her, shes super cute. Dont decide without meeting with her and talking to whoever evaluated her. BUT, my fiance adopted a very fearful dog from the humane society, before we met, when the dog was about 10 months old. In the three years that he had him, he bit 5 or 6 different people (roommates, friends, his brother) including me, three times. He was a lab, border collie, dalmation mix, about 70ish lbs. Every time he bit, he broke the skin, our friend has scars on his nose, and I have scars on my leg and in the palm of my hand, that bite needed stitches. Basically, a fearful dog is MUCH harder to help than one who is just plain aggressive. We worked with a number of trainers to try to help him. I should add that he attempted to bite me many, many more times, he just succeeded three times. He was afraid to go for walks, he was afraid to leave Drews (my fiance) room, he was afriad of new people, loud sounds, something different in the room, and even going outside. He was afraid of the kitchen, so he would only go out in the front yard, with Drew, or eventually, with me, and he shook the whole time. He peed when he was scared too, if you tried to take him outside for a walk, or into the kitchen, or even out of his room sometimes, he peed everywhere. If he was really really scared, he would poop. It was an involuntary thing, it just speaks to how very very frightened he was. Anyway, I could go on and on, in the end, Drew made the incredibly painful decision to have him put down. I would never want a dog who was that fearful again. Not only was he dangerous to us and to our guests, he was totally crippled by fear and had little quality of life. Also, Drew wasnt really able to enjoy him the way you should be able to enjoy a dog. He couldnt take him anywhere, and its hard to have a dog that NO ONE but you likes, because only Drew got to see the good side of him.
On the other hand, a chihuahua who bites is a much less serious problem than a 70 lb dog who bites. And that was just our experience. But it takes an incredible amount of time and patience, and its very slow going progress wise. Riley did get a little better, but not enough. Now, she may not be that bad, and its entirely possible that she could improve. Also, sometimes, animals behave very differently in shelters due to the stress than they would in the real world. Just be prepared to work really hard to help her. Fiddle would probably be helpful to her too. Im not saying dont do it, she may not be anything like Riley was, just go in with your eyes open.
Maybe someone else has had a more positive experience :)
Thanks for sharing! So sad to hear this dog was so fearful of so many things.
Do you know what it was from at all? Its hard with shelter dogs, you have no clue about what they have been through.

This is definately an eye opener. Not being able to leave his room, how terrible. And yes, it is hard having a dog no one else loves. my OH's mum has two dogs no one really likes because they are spoilt and not trained at all. Not even theyre names! and Its hard to be nice to them (I quietly blame her tho!)

I am also hoping Fiddle would be a help. Sort of Monkey see Monkey do?

I will be looking at her this saturday, the pound said I can bring Fiddle along, but I am not sure, they said she has not bitten other dogs, but still.... you dont know?

She has been there for 2 weeks with no interest in her. I am worried that she will be put down! How long do they usually keep animals?
 

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We dont know much about his history, presumably he was mistreated, but he may have just become a bit "unhinged" from his time in the shelter, some animals are able to tolerate that environment better than others. He was very sad. At first I felt bad for him, but after a year or so I grew to hate him too. Drew didnt even realize how much it bothered him until he got his new puppy, our yellow lab Ben. Everyone loves him, and he loves everyone. It puts a huge smile on Drews face every time we have friends over and Ben loves on them and is just thrilled to see someone new.
How long they stay at a shelter really just depends on the shelter itself. Some are "no kill", where they will keep adoptable animals indefinitely, but euthanize animals that are too aggressive etc, to be safely adopted out.
It is wonderful to adopt a pet from a shelter and give them a second chance. More often than not they are there through no fault of their own and can make a wonderful pet in a new home. That said, dont get her if you arent comfortable with the baggage she will bring just because you feel sorry for her.
Let us know how it goes on Saturday! She may be a mild case who would do much better with you. I would definitely ask them for a reference for a good trainer if you do decide to adopt her, even just one consultation could give you a lot of tools to help her. She really is a gorgeous little dog. Im a sucker from choc and tans as they always remind me of Reese :)


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Unfortunately fear biters are the worst kind as you never know what's going to trigger them to bite and they tend to bite the hardest. Was she a fear biter before being turned over to the shelter? Some dogs even the sweetest of dogs can turn into grumps when in a scary location like that.

Here is some info I found:
What is Dog Fear Aggression? And How to Deal with it

Fear Biting
This is a separate problem, caused by a fearful and submissive dog that feels cornered. It indicates an extremely poor temperament and possible abuse. Such dogs should never be bred.

To deal with a fear-biter (evidenced by a dog that bites/threatens to bite but has its ears laid back along its head rather than facing forward), first you have to deal with the insecurity and temperament of the dog. This kind of dog has no self-confidence at all, hence its ready alarm at normally innocuous situations.
You need to build up its confidence: pay close attention to understand exactly what sets it off (some are afraid of men, men with beards, people holding something in their hand, small children, etc) and for now, remove that from its environment. Do some training or other work with it to build up its confidence (the training in this case becomes a vehicle for praising the dog). Then work slowly on its fear.

You should really enlist professional help to deal with a fear biter unless you are experienced with dogs. This kind of dog takes lots of patience and careful reading and may never become trustworthy. If you cannot resolve its problems, consider having it destroyed; don't pass it along to someone else to become a problem for that person.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
We dont know much about his history, presumably he was mistreated, but he may have just become a bit "unhinged" from his time in the shelter, some animals are able to tolerate that environment better than others. He was very sad. At first I felt bad for him, but after a year or so I grew to hate him too. Drew didnt even realize how much it bothered him until he got his new puppy, our yellow lab Ben. Everyone loves him, and he loves everyone. It puts a huge smile on Drews face every time we have friends over and Ben loves on them and is just thrilled to see someone new.
How long they stay at a shelter really just depends on the shelter itself. Some are "no kill", where they will keep adoptable animals indefinitely, but euthanize animals that are too aggressive etc, to be safely adopted out.
It is wonderful to adopt a pet from a shelter and give them a second chance. More often than not they are there through no fault of their own and can make a wonderful pet in a new home. That said, dont get her if you arent comfortable with the baggage she will bring just because you feel sorry for her.
Let us know how it goes on Saturday! She may be a mild case who would do much better with you. I would definitely ask them for a reference for a good trainer if you do decide to adopt her, even just one consultation could give you a lot of tools to help her. She really is a gorgeous little dog. Im a sucker from choc and tans as they always remind me of Reese :)


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I think she a a little beauty too! I love that coloring! I am mixed emotions about her hey! I am still determined to see her on saturday and try to guage how severe the issue is. I will definately keep you posted, and take pics :D!

Unfortunately fear biters are the worst kind as you never know what's going to trigger them to bite and they tend to bite the hardest. Was she a fear biter before being turned over to the shelter? Some dogs even the sweetest of dogs can turn into grumps when in a scary location like that.

Here is some info I found:
What is Dog Fear Aggression? And How to Deal with it

Fear Biting
This is a separate problem, caused by a fearful and submissive dog that feels cornered. It indicates an extremely poor temperament and possible abuse. Such dogs should never be bred.

To deal with a fear-biter (evidenced by a dog that bites/threatens to bite but has its ears laid back along its head rather than facing forward), first you have to deal with the insecurity and temperament of the dog. This kind of dog has no self-confidence at all, hence its ready alarm at normally innocuous situations.
You need to build up its confidence: pay close attention to understand exactly what sets it off (some are afraid of men, men with beards, people holding something in their hand, small children, etc) and for now, remove that from its environment. Do some training or other work with it to build up its confidence (the training in this case becomes a vehicle for praising the dog). Then work slowly on its fear.

You should really enlist professional help to deal with a fear biter unless you are experienced with dogs. This kind of dog takes lots of patience and careful reading and may never become trustworthy. If you cannot resolve its problems, consider having it destroyed; don't pass it along to someone else to become a problem for that person.
Thanks Heather, I like your honesty in the last part. I honestly think, if she is on death row I will take her in to give her a chance, but if her problem is giving her a poor quality in life then I would consider having her PTS.

Hopefully she isnt so bad, I would even be happy for her to go to another loving family. Just the thought that any of those dogs having to be there is so sad.

Thanks for the link too! lots of good info!
 

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Does any one have any tips on how to gauge how severe it is? besides how she is around me?
 

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I would want to see how she is IN the shelter, in her little pen, and then I would want to take her to the play area and see how she behaves. Riley, our fear biter, was only happy in his safe place. At the shelter, for lack of a better alternative, that was his cage. When they tried to take him to the play area, he would become very afraid. When I spoke to the trainer who had evaluated him (I called after my second bite, my vet was already strongly suggesting we have him put down, but Drew wasnt ready and we wanted to see if he could be helped) she said he was the only dog she ever saw who wanted to go back to the shelter rather than out for free time. Im no expert, I can only advise you based on our experience, but to me, I would gauge how severe it is by seeing if she is fearful of most everything, as Riley was, or if its something more specific, kids, someone holding an umbrella, etc. If she seems really frightened of life in general, I would walk away, hard as it is. It was so difficult for Drew, he had years with Riley and he loved him and they bonded, and then he had to have him put down at only 4 years old. Not to mention the problems it caused between us. I was very resentful of the position I was put in- I didnt want to have to ask him to put his dog down, but I would have liked him to take it upon himself after I had been bitten the second time and needed stitches. We sought the help of trainers, months went on, he tried to bite me basically every week, and the next time he was successful, I still have a scar, I said "thats it!" and Drew made the decision to have him put to sleep. Even if he had never bitten me the third time, I still would never have felt he was safe, he had 8 or 9 bites under his belt regardless. How could I have felt safe having kids, or having my nieces over for a visit, knowing his history? And although I understood how hard it was for him to make that choice, it felt as though he put a dog over my safety, which didnt feel good. Keep that in consideration, she may be fine with you, but fearful of men and you could be dealing with the same problem. You love her and are attached and your OH hates her because shes constantly trying to take a bite out of him. Even though you know intellectually that of course it isnt the dogs fault, its hard to like the dog in spite of it.
If it were me, I would leave Fiddle safe at home for your first meeting on Sat, and if you really like this girl, bring Fiddle back for a second meeting if you need to.
Sorry for the ramble, I just want you to be prepared bc at this point she is just a cute chi who was caught your eye and you can still walk away, its much more difficult to part with them once she is your dog and youve bonded.
I hope she turns out to be ok, just feeling a little stressed and timid at the shelter.
 

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I think she a a little beauty too! I love that coloring! I am mixed emotions about her hey! I am still determined to see her on saturday and try to guage how severe the issue is. I will definately keep you posted, and take pics :D!



Thanks Heather, I like your honesty in the last part. I honestly think, if she is on death row I will take her in to give her a chance, but if her problem is giving her a poor quality in life then I would consider having her PTS.

Hopefully she isnt so bad, I would even be happy for her to go to another loving family. Just the thought that any of those dogs having to be there is so sad.

Thanks for the link too! lots of good info!
Oops...should have specified that was from another site, not me, The first part was from me, about them being the worst kind of biters. I got that part from a website, thought I copied the link with it.

My opinion would be to give her a chance, at least go and evaluate her and see just how bad she is. As long as you know what you are getting into.
 

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I would want to see how she is IN the shelter, in her little pen, and then I would want to take her to the play area and see how she behaves. Riley, our fear biter, was only happy in his safe place. At the shelter, for lack of a better alternative, that was his cage. When they tried to take him to the play area, he would become very afraid. When I spoke to the trainer who had evaluated him (I called after my second bite, my vet was already strongly suggesting we have him put down, but Drew wasnt ready and we wanted to see if he could be helped) she said he was the only dog she ever saw who wanted to go back to the shelter rather than out for free time. Im no expert, I can only advise you based on our experience, but to me, I would gauge how severe it is by seeing if she is fearful of most everything, as Riley was, or if its something more specific, kids, someone holding an umbrella, etc. If she seems really frightened of life in general, I would walk away, hard as it is. It was so difficult for Drew, he had years with Riley and he loved him and they bonded, and then he had to have him put down at only 4 years old. Not to mention the problems it caused between us. I was very resentful of the position I was put in- I didnt want to have to ask him to put his dog down, but I would have liked him to take it upon himself after I had been bitten the second time and needed stitches. We sought the help of trainers, months went on, he tried to bite me basically every week, and the next time he was successful, I still have a scar, I said "thats it!" and Drew made the decision to have him put to sleep. Even if he had never bitten me the third time, I still would never have felt he was safe, he had 8 or 9 bites under his belt regardless. How could I have felt safe having kids, or having my nieces over for a visit, knowing his history? And although I understood how hard it was for him to make that choice, it felt as though he put a dog over my safety, which didnt feel good. Keep that in consideration, she may be fine with you, but fearful of men and you could be dealing with the same problem. You love her and are attached and your OH hates her because shes constantly trying to take a bite out of him. Even though you know intellectually that of course it isnt the dogs fault, its hard to like the dog in spite of it.
If it were me, I would leave Fiddle safe at home for your first meeting on Sat, and if you really like this girl, bring Fiddle back for a second meeting if you need to.
Sorry for the ramble, I just want you to be prepared bc at this point she is just a cute chi who was caught your eye and you can still walk away, its much more difficult to part with them once she is your dog and youve bonded.
I hope she turns out to be ok, just feeling a little stressed and timid at the shelter.
Oh definately. I dont mind you rambling! You are giving me the reality kick I need because I know as soon as I go there I will want to save every dog I see!

I work for a Council as well and regularly have to go to our pound. The first time they gave me a little tour and I went home early and just cried.

But at least I know what to expect sort of. I just have to make sure I make decisions with my head and NOT my mushy lil heart!

Oops...should have specified that was from another site, not me, The first part was from me, about them being the worst kind of biters. I got that part from a website, thought I copied the link with it.

My opinion would be to give her a chance, at least go and evaluate her and see just how bad she is. As long as you know what you are getting into.
I totally agree. After I see her and assess what she is like I have to tell my dad. He is a dog person too and I think If i tell him she is on death row, might tug at his heart strings just enough.
 

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i talk to people who have have on contact with this girl :) will see if they can confirm that she is a fear biter and if so what they think about how server it is , another thing to think about is some dogs / breeds dont do well in pounds and will react different once in a different environment .
 

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forgot to add the pound will not release a dangerous dog so with her still being able to be adopted at this point it is a good thing :)
 

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i just got told by one rescuer to take her out into one of the yards away from the other dogs and spend some time with her :) and that should give you a better idea of how she is away from the pound :)
 

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"It is wonderful to adopt a pet from a shelter and give them a second chance. More often than not they are there through no fault of their own and can make a wonderful pet in a new home. That said, dont get her if you arent comfortable with the baggage she will bring just because you feel sorry for her."

I agree with these statements. Sadly, you can't save them all, no matter how beautiful they are. If she is a true biter and not just scared from being at the shelter, she will be better off being put to sleep. That's not a pretty thought, but it's reality. She needs to spend some time in a foster home to see how she acts away from the shelter. She won't look so beautiful to you after she bites a child and leaves a scar on his/her face and you won't like the liability of having a biting dog around. Even if she's biting just because she's scared, she might very well get scared in a loving home and bite there, too. I wish they all were happy, gentle dogs, but they aren't. I agree that you should probably not adopt a dog that bites since you don't have experience with them. I wouldn't either. I'm not up to handling one that bites.

Jeanette
 

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she hasnt been 100% confirmed as a fear biter as of yet was just mentioned that she could be , i should have this confirmed by tomorrow if she is as a rescuer is going in to test her :) , if she is a fear biter the person testing her will more than likely take her on :) .
 

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Woah,

Thanks so much for replying and sharing! Yes I read when I was puppy hunting that Chi's are the only dogs that inherit temperment or something along those lines, thats why it was very important to meet the rents.

Fiddle bites now but it is play biting when we are mucking about (We were trying to get rid of all bite inhibition but my partner always encoraged it during play, so we only got her to the point of soft biting)

As this is a rescue I wouldnt know if it was a genetic thing or just from experience. How is she with you? Is she still timid/biting around you? or just new people?

Also, does this affect her behaviour in the pack? (I would simply DIE if anything happened to Fiddle)

Matilda is WONDERFUL with us! The only time she'll show any type of growling or anything is if I'm getting after one of the other Chi's for being naughty...if I get too angry instead of just "correcting" she's a great reminder for me to knock it down a notch. haha In those cases she'll simply give a tiny growl & shake. Which isn't a bad thing. I call her our little "peace keeper" simply because she dislikes any of the wrong kind of high energy from humans or animals. She's fine if anyone is playing (and my Chi's know how to play rough) -- she's actually typically in the middle of the playing. We have no issues with her at home as far as her fear issue goes unless you count the fear of thunder & such but those don't cause her fear aggression.

She has absolutely no issues with the people/strangers even people that come into the house other than giving her loud "howl" bark she gives for the first minute they're here. Her fear issue is with the actual contact of people whom she doesn't trust completely & will only bite if you push yourself on her. If someone reaches for her who she isn't comfortable with she'll just run/hop away. But if someone ever cornered & got ahold of her (she's a great runner & only reacts as a last resort) or if I handed her to someone she doesn't trust she will bite. But she'll even offer kisses to hands of those *even strangers* if you just hold your hand out for her to sniff. She'd never EVER approach somebody for the sole purpose of being aggressive. She has a geniun fear of contact from those she doesn't fully trust.

If we have company that she is somewhat familiar with...she'll sit in their laps but sometimes if they try touch her she'll hop out like she's afraid they're going to hurt her. It's quite sad how much she doesn't trust people. However she loves to be around people...it's really quite strange. She loves seeing people who she knows & will usually allow those people to touch her a bit but when she's had enough she'll just hope down from the furniture or go to another room. She's typically a very happy & playful girl.

But with my husband (who is her fav), my daughters & I we can hold her any way we like. On her back like a baby, stuff her in our jacket/sweatshirts, I can poke around in her mouth, ears, feet, etc w/o any issues what so ever. I trust her completely with my daughters--she sleeps with them at night & has always snuggled right up with them no issues. She trusts all of us fully. She also loves her pack of Chi's though she is a "diva" with the other girls & would rather not share whoever she is sitting with at the moment with them--but she's not aggressive to them...she sometimes just walk away if they come close but not always.

I'd say I'd pass on a dog that has fear aggression but until you meet them you don't know to what extent their behavior is. They may be able to fit into your family just fine as they live with you & gain your trust BUT chances are there will always be some type of issue & they will always have some limitations. If you're not up for the challenge definitely pass. Fear aggression is DEFINITELY harder to deal with than regular aggression & it will take an experienced dog owner to help them & to keep everyone safe. It will be a lot work for sure...
 

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I'd say I'd pass on a dog that has fear aggression but until you meet them you don't know to what extent their behavior is. They may be able to fit into your family just fine as they live with you & gain your trust BUT chances are there will always be some type of issue & they will always have some limitations. If you're not up for the challenge definitely pass. Fear aggression is DEFINITELY harder to deal with than regular aggression & it will take an experienced dog owner to help them & to keep everyone safe. It will be a lot work for sure...
That is so very true and very good advice :) , i really hope she isnt fear aggressive it would make her search for new home so much easier :(
 
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