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I have had my granddaughter's little Yorkie, Samantha, for two weeks now. I know, she's not a Chi, but I think what works for one little dog might work for another. She's four years old and weighs 6 pounds. She has not been spayed and is not potty trained. :eek:( I didn't raise her. I have raised a lot of puppies and had a lot of dogs, but have never tackled a four-year-old that isn't potty trained. I have potty trained many different breeds successfully. She has been to my house many times, so I am not a stranger to her. She doesn't give any warning that she is going to potty, just does the deed. She will pee/poop on the couch, in a snuggle bed, on the bed, on her favorite blanket. She doesn't do this at my house because I make her stay in her crate or confined to the kitchen unless I can be holding her leash watching her. She does use the potty pad in her crate and once in a while will use the one in the kitchen, but more often will not.

I know how to potty train a dog, but most of the things that work don't work with this one. Catching them in the act is necessary and doing that with Samantha is very difficult. I am gentle with her, tell her "no, no" when she potties and take her to the potty pad and put her on it, telling her "good girl on the paper." That doesn't happen often because I can't catch her in the act most of the time.

She is sweet and affectionate and smart, I think. She knows "sit" and will go into her crate when told to. She knows "toy" and will get one when you say toy. I know she's in a strange place and gave her a few days to get settled in, which she has done. I let her sit on my lap for a few minutes, play with her and take her for walks. I cuddle her and she gets plenty of attention. My dogs get along fine with her, but she doesn't join in and play with them. She's always been the only dog.

Any suggestions would be appreciated. I know she's had four years to practice her bad habits and it's not going to be easy or quick to change her. Has anyone ever tackled a dog her age and been successful with potty training? I'm treating her like a puppy. She pooped in one of my snuggle beds this morning! Very frustrating!

Jeanette
 

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I am sure will get lots of good suggestions here. But one, that I see right off, which for me is difficult, it to keep her in her crate until she learns she cannot come out till she learns to potty on the pad or outside. If she uses the pad inside her crate, then she has to spend 95% if her time there. It' hard to keep them in a crate, but I do believe it works.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
any suggestions

I am sure will get lots of good suggestions here. But one, that I see right off, which for me is difficult, it to keep her in her crate until she learns she cannot come out till she learns to potty on the pad or outside. If she uses the pad inside her crate, then she has to spend 95% if her time there. It' hard to keep them in a crate, but I do believe it works.
I think you're right. The idea is to give the dog a chance to be successful ... going potty on the potty pad. So, if she only uses the potty pad in the crate, that's where she needs to be. The idea is to potty pad train her, not train her to go outside. (I had a dog once that I trained to go into her crate and use the potty pad in there. It worked great.) My son works four 10-hour days and he doesn't want to leave Sammy in her crate that long, but I don't think it would hurt her at all. My vet doesn't think it would hurt her at all either. She has a really big crate with plenty of room to move around. She would just sleep most of the time and then he can let her out to exercise and play when he gets home, but he's still going to have to teach her that the only place to potty is on the potty pad.

Jeanette
 

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I'm a little confused? Are you keeping the dog or just watching her for your granddaughter? If you're watching her for your granddaughter; No amount of potty training is going to work if she goes home & your granddaughter lets her piddle & poop where ever & when ever she wants. Your granddaughter has to be on the same page with you to make this work. This Yorkie sounds very smart, as most dogs are, & very trainable. One thing I would definitely do is take the Yorkie outside every 2-3 hours til she gets the idea that the business is to be done "Outside."
 

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I'm curious how she acts at home. Does she get to go potty anywhere she wants? :(
I'm afraid that's pretty much right. She has a really big crate, but my son doesn't want to confine her for 10-12 hours every day while he's at work. The crate is big (41" long, 28" tall, 25" wide) and she has plenty of room to move around and she would be just fine. My son works four 10-hour days and drives almost an hour each way to work and is then off three days, so she would get plenty of attention, besides being at home with her in the evenings, of course. All of the apartment is carpeted except the small kitchen and bathroom. He has tried blocking her in the kitchen, but she climbs over the x-pen fence. I have her blocked in my kitchen with an x-pen fence and she doesn't climb over it, but I don't go out and leave her in there. I put her in her crate. There are potty pads all over the apartment, but she rarely uses them.

Jeanette
 

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I'm a little confused? Are you keeping the dog or just watching her for your granddaughter? If you're watching her for your granddaughter; No amount of potty training is going to work if she goes home & your granddaughter lets her piddle & poop where ever & when ever she wants. Your granddaughter has to be on the same page with you to make this work. This Yorkie sounds very smart, as most dogs are, & very trainable. One thing I would definitely do is take the Yorkie outside every 2-3 hours til she gets the idea that the business is to be done "Outside."
I am supposed to be dog sitting Samantha for a couple of weeks, but wanted to see if I thought I might potty train her and then would try to get my son to let me keep her a while longer. We are not training her to go potty outside. We want her to use potty pads. She lives with my son, who has to be gone about 12 hours a day, four days a week. My granddaughter lives with her mother (parents are divorced) and is not there all the time. She lives close to her dad though and is there quite a lot. She's 14. I don't intend to keep Samantha, but would be willing to keep her a while if I thought I could successfully potty train her. I'm afraid my soft-hearted son and granddaughter will not continue being diligent or firm with her when she goes back home. Perhaps I'm fighting a losing battle from the beginning!

Samantha has been here two weeks now and I haven't seen any change in her potty habits. She did pee on the potty pad in her crate during the night, but pooped in the floor in the kitchen as soon as I let her out to run around. I've never seen a dog that would potty on the couch or bed or in their snuggle bed before. Samantha is smart. She has learned to go into the kitchen when I say "kitchen" and open the x-pen fence for her. I haven't hit on the way to get it across to her that she's supposed to go potty on the potty pads.

The whole thing is not her fault. I think she thinks she's not supposed to go potty, period, because she acts guilty if she potties, and hasn't figured out that it's perfectly all right to potty on the potty pads. If she potties and I speak to her when I notice it, she might go to the potty pad. Have to get it across to her to go to the potty pad before, not after. I am very gentle with her, don't raise my voice, don't punish. Just tell her gently and put her on the potty pad. The very few times (twice) she has used the potty pad and I saw her, I have praised her a lot, given her a treat, made a big deal of it. I can't watch her every minute, but think that's what it would take.

Jeanette
 

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The very few times (twice) she has used the potty pad and I saw her, I have praised her a lot, given her a treat, made a big deal of it. I can't watch her every minute, but think that's what it would take.

Jeanette
You are spot on. That is EXACTLY what it's going to take. Getting this dog to learn to potty where she is supposed to, after all this time, is going to be an uphill battle. It can be done, I've known of harder cases than this who've accomplished it, but it requires a high level of dedication and absolute, unwavering consistency.

I feel sorry for the dog. :(
 

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You are spot on. That is EXACTLY what it's going to take. Getting this dog to learn to potty where she is supposed to, after all this time, is going to be an uphill battle. It can be done, I've known of harder cases than this who've accomplished it, but it requires a high level of dedication and absolute, unwavering consistency.

I feel sorry for the dog. :(
Yes, I think so, too. Like potty training any puppy/dog, you must catch them every time, no accidents allowed, absolute consistency. I can do it with enough time, but don't think my son will. It isn't Sammy's fault and I don't punish her at all, just tell her gently and love her. I sit in the kitchen with her and play with her and let her sit on my lap for a while. She's a sweetheart and I'm sorry that she has been allowed to grow up and go so long without proper training to make it comfortable to live with her. I wish my son and granddaughter would agree to let her go to another home where she would get the training she needs, but I don't think that's going to happen either. My son is gone a lot and my granddaughter will be gone more and more. Teenagers aren't very consistent, I'm afraid. They love her, but she needs some tough love for her own good. My son has said he's planning to get Sammy spayed next month. I will prod him to go through with that. I'm just hanging in there while Sammy is with me, showing her where she is supposed to potty and protecting my carpet and furniture. I think that's about all I can do at this point.

Thanks for all the comments and suggestions. I was wanting any ideas anyone might have that I haven't thought of. I will give my son another lecture about potty training her when he takes her home and keeping her confined when he's gone.

Jeanette
 

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I agree with Tink in that watching her every second she is out of a crate is exactly what must be done. If she is out of a crate she needs to be attached to you by a leash so she can't go off and potty where she shouldn't.

I wonder if potty pads aren't the way to go with this dog. She was raised for 4 years (I think I read that she is 4 years old?) with potty pads around but no real training and being allowed to potty everywhere else but sometimes she pottied on them and got praise but I'm sure she pottied on them and didn't sometimes too. I wonder if potty pads just don't mean anything to her and it's confusing to her that you seem to place value on them?

If she were mine I would start all over with a different potty method, treating her like a puppy. Outdoors would be my choice since it is so different it would be a whole new skill to learn but I know you don't want to do that. Maybe use a litterbox with sod or one of the fake grass patches? While she is with you put her in an appropriately sized crate, just big enough to lie down, stand up and turn around. No potty pads in the crate! Every time you take her out of the crate take her right to the grass patch or litter box and encourage her to potty. If she does, great and praise! If not she goes back in her crate. Any time she is out of the crate, she is attached to you by a leash. Take her back to the patch any time you start to see her sniff around or start pacing or look uncomfortable sitting or lying down and standing more.

As she gets better and better she can earn little tiny bits of freedom after she potties.

If you can do this and get to really understand where she is supposed to potty then she can go back to your son and have her grass patch in the kitchen with baby gates closing her in.

I do think you are climbing a very long, steep hill. This is going to be a lot of work and you are going to have to be more consistent than you've been up to this point but it can be done.
 

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A lady across the street from me has a 2 year old CHI she got from someone and it not trained at all. she has been trying and now feed up and wanted me to take it, my husband says no. I just got my Amberleah and she needs all my attention. If anyone live in Michigan area and want the cute little guy, he is chocolate color.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
any suggestions

I agree with Tink in that watching her every second she is out of a crate is exactly what must be done. If she is out of a crate she needs to be attached to you by a leash so she can't go off and potty where she shouldn't.

I wonder if potty pads aren't the way to go with this dog. She was raised for 4 years (I think I read that she is 4 years old?) with potty pads around but no real training and being allowed to potty everywhere else but sometimes she pottied on them and got praise but I'm sure she pottied on them and didn't sometimes too. I wonder if potty pads just don't mean anything to her and it's confusing to her that you seem to place value on them?

If she were mine I would start all over with a different potty method, treating her like a puppy. Outdoors would be my choice since it is so different it would be a whole new skill to learn but I know you don't want to do that. Maybe use a litterbox with sod or one of the fake grass patches? While she is with you put her in an appropriately sized crate, just big enough to lie down, stand up and turn around. No potty pads in the crate! Every time you take her out of the crate take her right to the grass patch or litter box and encourage her to potty. If she does, great and praise! If not she goes back in her crate. Any time she is out of the crate, she is attached to you by a leash. Take her back to the patch any time you start to see her sniff around or start pacing or look uncomfortable sitting or lying down and standing more.

As she gets better and better she can earn little tiny bits of freedom after she potties.

If you can do this and get to really understand where she is supposed to potty then she can go back to your son and have her grass patch in the kitchen with baby gates closing her in.

I do think you are climbing a very long, steep hill. This is going to be a lot of work and you are going to have to be more consistent than you've been up to this point but it can be done.
Thanks for the good suggestions.

No chance that Samantha will be trained to go potty outside. It just isn't practical.

I think she had trouble telling the potty pads from carpet or anything else, so have given her a brown tray with the potty pad in it. It's easy to see and has ridges on the bottom, so it feels different from carpet or tile. She has used it twice now. I don't know if she would transition to a grass patch. She does go potty when I take her for walks, so she knows it's OK, but I don't intend to be taking her outside after dark or in nasty weather.

I am being very consistent with her and correct her or praise her every time. She does use the potty pad in her crate, so I don't think that's a problem. Every time she uses the pad, it's a victory! She gets to walk around or lay on the couch with me for a few minutes at a time on her leash. I wait until right after she has pottied. Sammy doesn't give good signs that she is about to potty. She doesn't sniff around, just does it. It's very hard to catch her, but I'm paying close attention and trying to learn any slight signals.

She won't get any more time out of the crate or kitchen until she uses the potty pad more consistently. I have plenty of time ... I'm retired. My son will let her stay with me for a while longer. I'm not giving up. She's worth the effort!

Jeanette
 

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A lady across the street from me has a 2 year old CHI she got from someone and it not trained at all. she has been trying and now feed up and wanted me to take it, my husband says no. I just got my Amberleah and she needs all my attention. If anyone live in Michigan area and want the cute little guy, he is chocolate color.
Taking on a grown dog that isn't potty trained is a BIG deal. I hope this little guy finds a good home with someone willing to invest the time he needs. I tackled a 9-month-old Chi from a puppy mill a few years ago. I was willing to do whatever it might take to potty train her, get her socialized, etc. She was very sweet and smart, but I had her about a year and never could get her potty trained. Turned out, she had a birth defect and was incontinent and I had to have her PTS. Broke my heart to lose her like that. She was uncomfortable, bless her little heart, and maybe in pain, couldn't know. I still think of her and shed tears. I wanted so much for her. If the dog doesn't have a physical problem, potty training can be done, but it takes a lot of consistency and dedication.

Jeanette
 

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The fact that a grass patch or litterbox is different is kind of the point. It sounds like potty pads have lost their meaning. She just doesn't "see" them as something significant. It might be easier and make more sense to her brain to start over with something different so she can really wrap her brain around it. I know you don't want to train her to go outside, that's why I suggested a grass patch or litterbox.

If you remove the potty pad from the crate and keep her in a smaller crate she will learn to hold it better. It also means that you are taking her to, and seeing her potty, so you can praise her. Every time she goes. If you are retired and home all the time then there is really no reason for a pad in the crate since she is not going to be crated for hours and hours at a time.

It just sounds to me like this girl is very confused. Nothing has been consistent. I would try to make things as black and white for her as possible. No in-betweens.

Just my opinion, no offense meant.
 

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The fact that a grass patch or litterbox is different is kind of the point. It sounds like potty pads have lost their meaning. She just doesn't "see" them as something significant. It might be easier and make more sense to her brain to start over with something different so she can really wrap her brain around it. I know you don't want to train her to go outside, that's why I suggested a grass patch or litterbox.

If you remove the potty pad from the crate and keep her in a smaller crate she will learn to hold it better. It also means that you are taking her to, and seeing her potty, so you can praise her. Every time she goes. If you are retired and home all the time then there is really no reason for a pad in the crate since she is not going to be crated for hours and hours at a time.

It just sounds to me like this girl is very confused. Nothing has been consistent. I would try to make things as black and white for her as possible. No in-betweens.

Just my opinion, no offense meant.
Great advice and no offense taken!! I wanted different ideas and I like the idea of a totally different potty training approach. The biggest problem is no consistent potty training ... that's for sure. I have crates in different sizes, from very small to a couple of sizes in between and then big ones. I can use a small one without a potty pad, but Samantha does potty on her bed/blanket, so I wonder if a smaller crate without a potty pad would just encourage her to do that and I should remove the bed/blanket, too? I'm only gone for an hour or two during the day and she certainly can hold it that long. She sleeps in the crate at night and sometimes uses the potty pad and sometimes does not. Humans think they need something soft, but she curls up on the tile in the kitchen and sleeps just fine, beside her bed. Nothing to potty on might discourage her and encourage her to wait until morning when I could offer her the grass patch or whatever. She doesn't have a snuggle bed at home because she insists on peeing on it.

I appreciate all comments. As I said, I've potty trained a lot of puppies, but have never tackled one like Samantha. I think Sammy is very confused about what she is supposed to do. She is smart and wants to please, but she just doesn't know what to do.

I'm going to look into a totally different approach, grass patch or litter box (potty pads in a different color and texture?). I have two washable potty pads, but they would probably appear very much like carpets to Sammy.

Thanks again for all the great comments.

Jeanette
 

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You are doing a great thing for this little dog. Not many people would take this on, especially for someone else! Being potty trained opens up so many more options for all dogs.

I would use the smaller crate and remove the bedding for a few days, just to help her realize that she shouldn't potty in there, and then replace it later when she's getting a better idea of where/when to potty. The other reason I like the idea of no pottying in the crate is that she is going to have to think about pottying, not just go where ever the mood strikes. That will help her when she is out and about in the house as well.

I think you're right in that the washable pads would just look like rugs to her. I like the idea of the tray with different colored and textured pads or a litterbox. I think that will really make potty training a whole new skill that starts at square one where you can give her the consistency that her other owners didn't.

Thank you for giving this little dog the patience and love to help her learn!
 

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You are doing a great thing for this little dog. Not many people would take this on, especially for someone else! Being potty trained opens up so many more options for all dogs.

I would use the smaller crate and remove the bedding for a few days, just to help her realize that she shouldn't potty in there, and then replace it later when she's getting a better idea of where/when to potty. The other reason I like the idea of no pottying in the crate is that she is going to have to think about pottying, not just go where ever the mood strikes. That will help her when she is out and about in the house as well.

I think you're right in that the washable pads would just look like rugs to her. I like the idea of the tray with different colored and textured pads or a litterbox. I think that will really make potty training a whole new skill that starts at square one where you can give her the consistency that her other owners didn't.

Thank you for giving this little dog the patience and love to help her learn!
Samantha belongs to my son and granddaughter (my only grandchild) and I'm willing to expend some time and effort on their behalf. I'm pretty much a softie, too, when it comes to dogs. I've adopted several and founds homes for them. Samantha is a sweetheart despite her bad potty habits. I know that isn't her fault and I don't mind having her at my house. She gets attention and play time and cuddles just like my two furkids get.

My son has asthma that had been gone for many years, but has cropped up lately. His doctor says the dog causes problems, of course, since doctors don't like to admit any dog could be hyopallergenic. It is possible, I know, but it's more likely that urine in the old carpet was not good for his asthma and the mold he had been trying to eliminate for several months. Samantha has been with me over two weeks now and he has cleaned out the mold (he thinks), so we'll see if he has any more asthma trouble. If Samantha goes home and he has an asthma attack, we'll pretty much have to admit that she causes him problems. If it's a weekend and he can't get to his doctor, he has to go to the emergency room, and that isn't any fun at all.

I brought in one of my small crates, big enough for Sammy to stand up and turn around and lay down comfortably. I won't put anything in it, just the plastic tray to begin with. I don't know if you can get potty pads in colors that would stand out to a dog or not, but will look around. Sounds like a good thing to invent ... potty pads with a definitely different texture than carpets and in colors the dog would see and not confuse with the carpet or floor. You could get a contrasting color for where you want to put the pad so it would stand out. Potty pads with rough backs that wouldn't slide around so easily would be a good idea, too! I like the grass patch idea and will look this afternoon at the local dog supply place. They have pretty much everything. I have a UGODOG tray, so would only need the grass to go in/on it, I think.

Samantha is not dumb by any means. She goes in her crate when told to, will now go into the kitchen when I tell her to, knows "sit" and is doing pretty well with "quiet." She had never been walked on a leash very much and she caught on quickly that if she pulled, I would stop, when she relaxed, I would move on. She likes her crate and runs to it if she gets anxious. She has a little plastic carrier that she likes, too, and doesn't complain when she's in it to travel. Four years is a long time to do what she does the way she does it and it won't be changed in an instant.

Thanks for the good ideas. I'm going to try some of them!

Jeanette
 

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Maybe you should invent/patent different colored and textured potty pads!! Might be one of those obvious things that I never seem to think of until someone else has and then I wonder 'why didn't I think of that?' :D
 

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Maybe you should invent/patent different colored and textured potty pads!! Might be one of those obvious things that I never seem to think of until someone else has and then I wonder 'why didn't I think of that?' :D
hahaha ... yes, that's a good idea! Potty pads in different colors would make them stand out better, as long as they were colors dogs recognize. I wonder if dogs have a favorite color? I looked at the grass patch at the local pet store and it would probably work, but has to be washed often. I have a dark brown tray and a mat in the bottom with little bumps on it so it will stand out to Sammy and feel different under her feet. When I let her out of her crate this morning, I confined her to the potty pad with the x-pen and she pooped pretty quickly. I praised her and gave her treats. She had peed on the pad in her crate. She's sleeping now and when she wakes up, I'll take her to the pad again and maybe confine her to it (just wrap the x-pen around it) to see if she will pee. She has to have some successes to get praised for.

I don't have a big spacious house. Several years ago, I thought about a Christmas tree that you could hang on the wall ... really half a tree mounted on stout cardboard with branches you could configure, could be laid flat for storage and pulled down to use, maybe three feet tall. Just pull down the branches and arrange them and hang on the wall and decorate. Wouldn't take up much space and was still pretty. You could hang it on the wall over a little table. I even talked to some of my family members about it. Well, a couple of years later, exactly that Christmas tree showed up for sale ... talk about wishing I had followed up on thinking of it!!

Jeanette
 

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Well, I've had some success with Samantha and the potty pad in the dark tray with a mat under the pad with little bumps on it. She used the potty pad ALL DAY yesterday! No accidents anywhere. When I let her out of her crate this morning and put her in the kitchen, she pooped on the potty pad in the kitchen first thing, without being confined by the x-pen on the potty pad. I give her really great treats, pieces of baby food chicken meat sticks. I coax her onto the potty pad often, sometimes giving her a treat just for getting on the pad, sometimes just giving her praise. I'm happy as long as she uses the potty pad in her crate, so haven't gone to the small crate at this point. She did pee on her potty pad in her crate during the night and while I was gone to the fitness center to walk this morning. That's OK ... on the potty pad is what I want. Maybe there's light at the end of the tunnel!

Jeanette
 
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