Chihuahua People Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,126 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Having Kahlua as a puppy was either a blessing or a curse. She was a perfect little angel without any bad habits.

Little Misty is a bit of a different case.. so thanks to Lua's great example I'm not prepared for it, LOL.

Misty's biggest issue is a very demanding bark. If she's in her crate (which we only do at night or if we're gone since she only uses the grass patch 100% if it's the one in the main room which has hardwood floor... she hasn't quite caught on that in our carpetted bedroom, we still have a potty patch.. lol..) and she sees us as we go to approach her, she barks like crazy. She does NOT do this at night, she doesn't do it constantly when she's alone, she's not even really a whiner; but ONLY when we start going toward the crate and she knows she's going to get let out. I think it's partly excitement/anticipation, but we DON'T want her thinking we're rewarding the behavior. So far, what we've been doing is approach the crate, and just stand there without making eye contact or anything until she settles down. Once she does and she's being quiet, THEN we take her out. But it really doesn't seem to be catching on with her, as she'll still bark like crazy initially. Is this something we need to be diligent with and eventually she'll learn there's no point to even starting barking?? Or should we be doing something more??

When she's OUT of the crate, if she sees you holding a treat or food and you're getting ready to give it to her, she does the same thing; BARKS very fast and urgently like she's demanding we give her the treat. In this case, I say a firm "No bark!" and she'll immediately stop, and sometimes even submissively roll over. Then, I make her sit (which she learned VERY quick, yay!) before rewarding her with whatever I have. And FWIW, if we use the "No bark," command while she's IN the crate, it does NOT work.. she'll just keep barking as if she's getting riled up by our voice. And I don't believe in physical discipline.. a firm voice, for my chi's anyway, usually is enough to make them behave. The most I'll do is immitate the way the dogs themselves communicate by a little pinch on the neck or whatever just as a mother would do.. but that's it. And even that I only do if they're sitting near each other or something and one growls at the other, I'll do that as a reminder to say 'Hey, I'm in charge here, not you.." Since the verbal command didn't work in the crate, that's why we tried the 'silent, no eye contact, no attention,' method which does work eventually. It just doesn't seem like it's sinking in since she its like we're starting over every time she gets put in it.

Any advice would be mucho appreciated... thanksies!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Aww, Misty is lucky to have such a patient and kind owner.

A different approach you could try is that AS SOON as she starts barking when you're approaching the crate, you immediately stop, turn around and leave the room.

When she stops barking, wait 10 seconds, and re-enter the room. Ten seconds (no rushing) is just long enough for her to still remember what's going on, but not so long that she'll just think it's coincidence when you do go back in.

Keep repeating this (which is where your patience comes in) until you can go right up to the crate without her barking.

The logic here is that what she wants is you. And every time she barks, she gets the exact opposite of what she wants - you leave. She's clever, she'll realise that the way to get what she wants (you), is to be quiet (which is what you want), so it ends up being a win-win situation.

It might be worth a try.

And as always with training, be patient and be consistent. Realistically it will be hard, because life gets in the way sometimes! For example, if you're in a rush for some reason and let her out the crate even when she's barking, then you'll really set back the training. You'll literally be teaching her that sometimes she can bark and still get what she wants.

I didn't understand if you're okay with the treat thing or not, when you stop her with a verbal command, so this is my 2cents worth on the other problem!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
I'd leave the room to our at least back off a substantial amount. you have to make it seem like barking means your leaving her. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,126 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Hmm, I'll definitely take the 'leave the room' advice! The only time I'll feel bad about this is when we wake up in the morning... first thing we do when we get out of bed (because the other 3 sleep in bed with us; she will too once she's more reliable using the potty patch in our bedroom) is take all the dogs outside. I'm gonna feel bad if I wake up, she starts barking as the other dogs head toward the door, and she ends up peeing herself from getting worked up after holding it all night if I just leave the room and ignore her. Maybe I'll just try "beating" her to the punch and open the crate door before she's even awake, LOL.. then she wont even have the chance to bark...

Thanks all, we'll def try the suggestions. And we've only had her since March 17th, so I know she'll need some time to catch on.. she's just definitely more stubborn than any other pups I've trained!

**Oh and yes, I'm okay with how she's currently "Settling" when I correct her verbally. She's gotten very good at that actually; though I'm not entirely sure WHY because other than saying "NO!" loudly she's never been reprimanded along with the command (at least not with me since I've had her; I cant speak for where she came from..). But even if she's growling at another dog unprovokedly or barking at a person, if I point at her and say "No" she stops immediately and usually does the submissive tail wagging roll over..
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top