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HYPOGLYCEMIA


This is low sugar level in the blood. This can result in the dog having a "sugar attack". Chihuahuas, especially puppies, can suffer from this condition. Frequently, this occurs when the dog suffers stress such as weaning or relocating to a new home.

This condition is usually easily reversed, however, if left unattended, this can become a life threatening situation.

SYMPTOMS:

Symptoms to look for include listlessness, pale to white gums, staggering, and refusal to eat. If the dog does not receive treatment for this, the "sugar attack" can progress into the more serious stages of this condition. Behavior such as inability to hold down food and diarrhea can become progressively worse to the point of siezures, complete unresponsiveness, and even death.

There are several remedies that can be used for a "sugar attack". Nutri-cal gel, made by Tomlyn, is one remedy that is easy to use, relatively inexpensive, and many pet stores carry this. It is a wonderful product to keep on hand at all times and it has a pretty long shelf life as long as it is kept in a cool place. We have used this product many many times and have had great results. Most dogs seem to really like the taste and therefore are cooperative when administering this. This product is great to use as a preventative and helps when a dog is already having a "sugar attack". The dog will usually just lick the end of the tube as you squeeze out about 1" of gel. In times of stress, a dose can be given every 2 hours or so depending on the dogs condition. If the dog is unable to lick the gel, sometimes you can use your finger to place a small amount of gel onto the roof of thier mouth. This will slowly dissolve and eventually enter the dogs blood stream. If the "sugar attack" is severe, this may buy some time for the dog until you can get to a vet. Nutri-cal gel is a wonderful product for those of you who like to travel with your chihuahuas in tow. It's easy to carry with you, (ladies it fits right into your purse) and it simply can be a life saver. Another product that can be used is called Pet Nutri-Drops. This comes in a pump bottle and is in liquid form. It must be kept out of direct sunlight,but need not be refrigerated. It breaks down into the blood stream in minutes. The maximum dose is 1 treatment every 6 hours. This is helpful to use when the dog is in need of more rapidly raising the blood sugar. This is also good to give once daily while a dog is under stress.

Of course the best remedy is always prevention. Close observation is necessary for the first couple of weeks until the dog settles in comfortably. Pay attention to the amount of food the dog is eating. If it seems that the dog isnt eating well, try to avoid the problems of "sugar attacks". It is much better to be safe than sorry. Preventative maintenance is much easier to deal with.

Remember this, it is very important to rule out other diseases or conditions as a cause of health problems. Sometimes these symptoms can be caused by parasites, liver malfunction, or Parvo virus. If you are ever not sure, it is always best to check with your vet. Again, better to be safe than sorry. We hope that this information is helpful to everyone. Good luck to all new pet owners.

NB : Please remember this should not be used to treat your dog alone if you feel your dog is in danger or just not quite right please take to vets as soon as possible. Chihuahua-people accepts no responsibility for persons following this advice
 

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What a GREAT posting!! Thanks for the information!

I'm currently giving my new pup nutrical for her symptons you described here...(except she's doing a great job of eating!) but she seemed very lithless etc.

How much should I give her? on the tube it states 1 & 1/2 tsp per 10lbs...well she's only 1 lb, and it doesn't mention how often to give.

She's only 6 wks old, and weighs 1 lb 12.8 oz, I have been giving her a pea size amount in the morning and again in the late afternoon. Should I be giving her more? you mentioned 1" every 6 hrs above, is that more the right amount for her age/weight? I don't want to over do! but I can see the HUGE difference in her alertness (and she's not as clumsy staggering around like a drunk man!)

TIA!!
DeAnna

 

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Hi guys, as we are puppies arriving tomorrow are goign to be 5.5 weeks old. Would it be a good idea to go to our vets and get some nutri-gel?

Also, what is the likely hood of a pup having this problem, and it is a temporary illness?

Thanks in Advance
 

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Hey all, I just read some of the posts and it is never ending in small/toy dogs. My baby got it twice! Once @ 8 weeks and then another @ 9. As long as your pup/dog is eating(well known brand food-Eukanuba,Royal Canin<--Dixie loves that one, etc.) and drinking well, it should be okay. After the 2nd time, I was advised to give Dixie a pea sized amount of Nutri-Cal 4-6 times a day. I don't give her much anymore since she has been doing great @ 13 weeks old.
 

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I really have to thank you very much for posting this advice! I didnt know a thing about this condition and im so glad i have read this article before i get my dog, and know what symptoms to look for.
Does anyone know what the product name is that i should buy in the U.K and where do i get it from? Thanks :)
 

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Any chance anyone could let me know what is in " Nutri-cal gel "
is it calcium based ?? ( looking through the supplements made
in the UK and trying to find a match ! )

Sara xx
 

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Here ya go, a list of ingredients and an analysis for Nutri-Cal

Ingredients:
Corn Syrup, Soybean Oil, Malt Syrup, Cod Liver Oil, Cane Molasses, Methylcellulose, Water, Gelatin By-products, dl-Alpha Tocopheryl Acetate (Vitamin E), Sodium Benzoate (Preservative), Manganese Sulfate, Iron Proteinate, Thiamine HCI, Niacin, Calcium Pantothenate (Source of Calcium and Pantothenic Acid), Magnesium Sulfate, Pyridoxine HCI, Vitamin A Palminate & D3 Supplement, Potassium Iodide (Source of Iodine and Potassium), Riboflavin 5' - Phosphate Sodium (Source of Vitamin B2 and Phosphorus), Folic Acid and Cyanocobalamin (Vitamin B12).

Guaranteed Analysis:
Crude Protein 0.7%, Crude Fat 34.5%, Calcium 0.16 mg, Phosphorus 0.02mg, Iron 0.47 mg, Iodine 0.50 mg, Magnesium 0.38 mg, Manganese 0.90 mg, Potassium 0.15 mg, Vitamin A 940 IU, Vitamin D3 54 IU, Vitamin E 5 IU, Vitamin B1 1.7 mg, Vitamin B2 0.2 mg, Vitamin B6 0.8 mg, Vitamin B12 1.9 mg, Folic Acid 0.2 mg, Niacin 1.9 mg, and d-Pantothenic Acid 0.9 mg. Also a source of Linoleic, Linolenic, Eicosapentanoic Acid, Docosahexanoic Acid and Omega-6 and Omega-3 Fatty Acids
 

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Hi Sara :) If you find a match could you please let me know what its called. As i want to have something handy in case my pup gets into this situation. Thx :)
 

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This happened to Chico the first day that I had him because the breeder, who had at least six different types of dogs to choose from, (can we say puppy mill/backyard breeder, my only excuse is that I was uneducated at that time and I am very glad that I rescued my baby from this horrible man) sold him to me with hook worms. His blood sugar not only dropped but his potasium levels did too. He started having seizures and I rushed him to the ER and they saved him but the vet told me that he had the worms for a while because it takes a while for the potasium to drop that low. He has had one other hypglycimic fit since but luckily I knew what to do that time and I always keep honey around the house just in case.
 

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I think this is a good article. I wanted to bring it up again.
 

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Hi, I also have Papillons who go Hyperglyciemic within 48 hours of having their innoculations, with my last boys jabs i managed a bit of advance damage control, I made sure he had cooked Chicken (Loads) before and after the jabs, I also made sure he had as much food as i could get into him, it seems they are also prone to "Sugar" drops just like Chihuahuas are, especialy if they have a really mad run round, the vets said small but often is always the idea for food and with pups high protien is good too, just my little say lol but i am glad you broached the subject well done
Kind regards
debra
 
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