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Discussion Starter #1
But,

Anyone know about Inplantation bleeding? During Pregnacy?
The reason I was asking my sister has been trying to get pregnant for 6 months with no baby :( Her last period was in April she does not have normal periods every 4 months well sunday she started having a brown discharge thats still going on so were trying to figure out if its inplantation bleeding..
 

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the inplantation bleeding that you are talking about doesn't last very long at all. and some don't even experience it.


she should buy a test (or 2 or 3 lol)
 

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yeah the implantation bleeding is often refered to as spotting which is usuually only a tiny amount but it can also be the beginning of a miscarriage so i wouild definately get it checked out , if its not like a normal period please convince her to go the doctors :wave:
 

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I had implantation bleeding and bleeding through out my entire pregnancy due to placenta previa. Thats where the egg implants low in the uterus and the placenta covers the opening to the cervix. If she has that then it could become a high risk pregnancy. Mine thank goodness moved when the baby started growing, most do but some dont and you have to have a c-section if it does not move. And the risks of miscarriage are greater :? here is some info

What is placenta previa and how common is it?
With placenta previa, the placenta covers part or all of the cervix. About one in 250 pregnant women develop this complication, which can cause severe, often painless bleeding usually toward the end of the second trimester or later. Uncontrolled hemorrhage can jeopardize a woman's life and the life of her baby, although this is rare. If the bleeding doesn't stop or if placenta previa causes preterm labor, the baby will be delivered by c-section even if a woman's due date is weeks away.

If an early ultrasound (between 12 and 14 weeks) shows the placenta near, or covering the cervix, don't be alarmed — it is most likely not placenta previa. As the uterus grows, it naturally pulls the placenta away from the cervix; in these cases, medical intervention generally isn't necessary.
What are the warning signs?
Painless vaginal bleeding during your second or third trimester can tip you off to the problem, and if this happens you should call your doctor or midwife immediately. But in many instances, there are no warning signs. In fact, most cases of placenta previa turn up during routine ultrasound exams.

Leslie Louie, of Oakland, California, is an example of someone who was diagnosed with placenta previa too early for warning signs to have appeared. Three years after a normal pregnancy with her first baby, Louie had become pregnant again. Because she was over 35, her doctor performed a sonogram at 16 weeks; it showed that the placenta was closer to her cervix than it should have been. But none of the doctors in her group practice seemed concerned, so Louie continued her rigorous schedule. She even went camping and took a trip to Africa.

Then a follow-up sonogram at 28 weeks showed that Louie's placenta was indeed covering her cervix. "Once my doctors realized it," says Louie, "they told me to watch for signs of bleeding." Her doctors also told her she would deliver by cesarean section and need to restrict her activities if she started spotting or bleeding. What they didn't say was that she'd also have to be on strict bedrest until she delivered her baby — something that took her by suprise when she began bleeding four weeks later.

Who's at risk?
Women who have delivered a baby by cesarean section or have previously been diagnosed with placenta previa face a higher risk with later pregnancies. If you're pregnant with twins, you're also more likely to develop placenta previa, though it's not clear why. And smoking increases the risk of fetal loss for women who have placenta previa. But most women who develop the condition have no apparent risk factors.

How is placenta previa treated?
Treatment depends on whether you're bleeding and how far along you are in your pregnancy. If the condition is diagnosed after the 20th week, but you're not bleeding, you'll probably be asked to cut way back on your activity level and increase the amount of time you spend in bed. If you're bleeding heavily, you'll have to be hospitalized until you and the baby have been stabilized. If the bleeding stops or is light you'll have to continue bed rest until the baby is ready to deliver.

At about 32 weeks, Leslie Louie had her first episode of bleeding — which was about as heavy as a menstrual period. She was given orders for strict bedrest, but four days later, the bleeding increased to gushing and she was put in the hospital for four days.

"The only reason they let me go home is that my husband works at home," says Louie. "Otherwise they probably would have made me stay in the hospital the whole month." She was given a series of steroid shots to help the baby's lungs develop in case she had to have an emergency delivery. Ultimately Louie was on bed rest for a month, getting up only to go to the bathroom and take quick showers.

At 36 weeks, Louie had a scheduled c-section, and she finally got to meet her healthy baby girl.


I hope this helps :D
 

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Rachael Polachek said:
If she's really serious about getting pregnant she should be willing to see a doctor when there's even a hint of a problem. She's not just being stubborn, she may be defeating the very thing she's trying to bring about, which is a healthy pregnancy.
i agree :?

i would go nuts if i was experiencing something like brown discharge ......

kisses nat
 

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Discussion Starter #11
She is pregnant!! I am gonna be a AUNT!!! WOOHOO I am so excited :D

Thank you all for the replys I made her read what KJ posted she got freaked and went to the docter. :wave:
 
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