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Can anyone recommend an effective bark control product for chi's? I bought a Petsafe device (not a collar; it's a stand alone 'bark detector' that supposedly emits a high-pitched sound)on eBay that was defective...returned it to the seller but am wondering if a new one might actually work well. Any info. appreciated...we have a 6 1/2 mo. chi that we are trying to train to be alone for a few hours so we can go out (we live in a condo)...it's tough as she barks and whines. Thanks!
-Pat.
 

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yea i know what you mean i was liveing in a apt that didn't allow barking dogs (LOL! :lol: yea i know no barking dogs!) anywayi tried that collor that has a lil buzzer on it and when the dog barks it makes a loud noise.

it doesn't work!!! when ever the collor hears aloud nosie weather it be you yelling,kids crying,door slam,loud tv ,etc it would go off.
i hurd the ones that spray works
 

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This is an article from the Dumb Friends League, a site I frequent often when I am trying to correct a behavior that Cooper decides to start up. I hope it helps!

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Some canine behavior problems, such as housesoiling, affect only a dog’s owners. However, problems such as escaping and excessive barking can result in neighborhood disputes and violations of animal control ordinances. Therefore, barking dogs can become “people problems.” If your dog’s barking has created neighborhood tension, it’s a good idea to discuss the problem with your neighbors. It is perfectly normal and reasonable for dogs to bark from time to time, just as children make noise when they play outside. However, continual barking for long periods of time is a sign that your dog has a problem that needs to be addressed.

The first thing you need to do is determine when and for how long your dog barks, and what is causing him to bark. You may need to do some detective work to obtain this information, especially if the barking occurs when you’re not home. Ask your neighbors, drive or walk around the block and watch and listen for a while, or start a tape recorder or video camera when you leave for work. Hopefully, you will be able to discover which of the common problems discussed below is the cause of your dog’s barking.

Social Isolation/Frustration/Attention Seeking
Your dog may be barking because he’s bored and lonely if:
• He’s left alone for long periods of time without opportunities for interaction with you.
• His environment is relatively barren, without playmates or toys.
• He’s a puppy or adolescent (under 3 years old) and does not have other outlets for his energy.
• He’s a particularly active type of dog (like the herding or sporting breeds) who needs a “job” to be happy.

Recommendations:
Expand your dog’s world and increase his “people time” in the following ways:
• Walk your dog daily – it’s good exercise for both of you.
• Teach your dog to fetch a ball or Frisbee and practice with him as often as possible.
• Teach your dog a few commands and/or tricks and practice them every day for five to 10 minutes.
• Take an obedience class with your dog.
• Provide interesting toys to keep your dog busy when you’re not home (Kong-type toys filled with treats or busy-box toys). Rotating the toys makes them seem new and interesting (see our handout, “Dog Toys and How to Use Them”).
• If your dog is barking to get your attention, make sure he has sufficient time with you on a daily basis (petting, grooming, playing, exercising), so he doesn’t have to resort to misbehaving to get your attention.
• Keep your dog inside when you’re unable to supervise him.
• Take your dog to work with you every now and then, if possible.
• If you work very long hours, take him to a doggie day care or have a friend or neighbor walk and/or play with him.

Territorial/Protective Behavior
Your dog may be barking to guard his territory if:
• The barking occurs in the presence of “intruders,” which may include the mail carrier, children walking to school and other dogs or neighbors in adjacent yards.
• Your dog’s posture while he’s barking appears threatening – tail held high and ears up and forward.
• You’ve encouraged your dog to be responsive to people and noises outside.

Recommendations:
• Teach your dog a “quiet” command. When he begins to bark at a passer-by, allow two or three barks, then say “quiet” and interrupt his barking by shaking a can filled with pennies or squirting water at his mouth with a spray bottle or squirt gun. This will cause him to stop barking momentarily. While he’s quiet, say “good quiet” and pop a tasty treat into his mouth. Remember, the loud noise or squirt isn’t meant to punish him; rather it is to startle him into being quiet so you can quickly reward him. If your dog is frightened by the noise or squirt bottle, find an alternative
method of interrupting his barking (throw a toy or ball toward him).
• Desensitize your dog to the stimulus that triggers the barking. Teach him that the people he views as intruders are actually friends and that good things happen to him when these people are around. Ask someone to walk by your yard, starting far enough away so that your dog is not barking, then reward him for quiet behavior as he obeys a “sit” or “down” command. Use a very special food reward such as little pieces of cheese or meat. As the person gradually comes closer, continue to reward his quiet behavior. It may take several sessions before the person can
come close without your dog barking. When the person can come very close without your dog barking, have them feed him a treat or throw a toy for him. In order for this technique to work, you’ll have to make sure your dog doesn’t see people outside between sessions.
• If your dog barks while inside the house when you’re home, call him to you, have him obey a command, such as “sit” or “down,” and reward him with praise and a treat.
• Don’t inadvertently encourage this type of barking by enticing your dog to bark at things he hears or sees outside.
• Have your dog neutered (or spayed if your dog is a female) to decrease territorial behavior.
• Limit the dog’s access to views that might be causing him to bark when you are not home.

Fears And Phobias
Your dog’s barking may be a response to something he is afraid of if:
• The barking occurs when he’s exposed to loud noises, such as thunderstorms, firecrackers or construction equipment.
• Your dog’s posture indicates fear – ears back, tail held low.

Recommendations:
• Identify what is frightening your dog and desensitize him to it (see our handouts, “Helping Your Dog Overcome the Fear of Thunder and Other Startling Noises” and “Tools for Managing Your Pets’ Anxiety”).
• Mute noise from outside by leaving your dog in a basement or windowless bathroom and leave on a television, radio or loud fan. Block off your dog’s access to outdoor views that might be causing a fear response, by closing curtains or doors to certain rooms.

Separation Anxiety
Your dog may be barking due to separation anxiety if:
• The barking occurs only when you’re gone and starts as soon as, or shortly after, you leave.
• Your dog displays other behaviors that reflect a strong attachment to you, such as following you from room to room, frantic greetings or reacting anxiously to your preparations to leave.
• Your dog has recently experienced a change in the family’s schedule that results in his being left alone more often; a move to a new house; the death or loss of a family member or another family pet; or a period at an animal shelter or boarding kennel.

Recommendations:
• Separation anxiety may be resolved using counter-conditioning and desensitization techniques (see our handouts, “Separation Anxiety” and “Tools for Managing Your Pets’ Anxiety”).

Bark Collars
Bark collars are specially designed to deliver an aversive whenever your dog barks. There are several different kinds of bark collars:
• Citronella Collar: This collar contains a reservoir of citronella solution that sprays into your dog’s face every time he barks. A citronella collar is considered humane and does work with some dogs. One possible drawback is that the collar contains a microphone, so the aversive is delivered in response to the sound of the bark. Therefore, other noises may set off the collar, causing your dog to be sprayed even if he did not bark. Also, some dogs can tell when the citronella reservoir is empty and will resume barking. You can also purchase a citronella collar that is activated
by a handler.
• Aversive Sound Collar: This collar emits a high-frequency sound when your dog barks. Some are activated by the noise of the bark, while others are activated by a handler. The rate of success for this type of collar is reported to be quite low.
• Electric Shock Collar: WE DO NOT RECOMMEND an electric shock collar to control your dog’s barking. The electric shock is painful to your dog and many dogs will choose to endure the pain and continue barking. These collars are expensive and their success rate is very low. Also, redirected aggression toward people or pets that are around the
dog may result.

The main drawback of any bark collar is that it does not address the underlying cause of the barking. You may be able to eliminate the barking, but symptom substitution may occur and your dog may begin digging, escaping or become destructive or even aggressive. The use of a bark collar must be in conjunction with behavior modification based on the
reason for the barking, as outlined above. You should never use a bark collar on your dog if his barking is due to separation anxiety, fears or phobias, because punishment always makes fear and anxiety behaviors worse.
 2003 Dumb Friends League.
 

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Isabelle barked all the time so I went to petsmart and bought a silent whistle it's called. It has worked so much now all I have to do is show her the whislte and she stops barking. It's very cheap it was only 2.50 and it does not hurt your dog it just makes a sound that they don't like. I would definetly try it she hardly barks now.
 

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I don't know about these bark control devices....I read about one that attaches to a collar that emits a high pitched noise to frighten the dog, and I really don't think it's very kind to any dog, especially a small dog like a Chi.

I'm sure there are remedies for excessive barking that don't involve special devices to scare your dog.

My advice is buy a book on dog training and try and understand why your chi is barking.
I know that if you don't let your Chi have its "alone-time" when they are young, gradually increasing the length of time, that they can become very distressed at being left alone. Even for five minutes.
I read up on all these things before I got Lexi to make sure I didn't make big mistakes with her. At the end of the day, not enough training isn't just bad for the owner, it's a shame for the dog mentally.

I really hope you get something sorted with your Chi, it must be frustrating knowing that you can't leave the house without your dog going crazy pining for you. With persistance and understanding i'm sure you'll help her cope with it better :wave:
 

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Great article! Zeus recently became a barker when we moved to VA. Our neighborhood is still being developed and tehre is a lot of construction going on and the littlest bang and Zeus is barking (not cool when you have a 4 week old baby who *just* fell asleep... grrr). I just enrolled Zeus in classes at Petsmart and that is one area we're going to focus on. They encourage positive-reinforcement training and I"m a big proponent of that type of training.
 

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Thanks... I use the Dumb Friend's League website for just about everything! :D All their solutions to problems are humane (they ARE a rescue organization) and they work most of the time.
 

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I bought Cooper a citronella collar from EBay, and it worked, but not on him. His bark I think was too high pitched for it to go off. If he growled it worked, but that's not the problem I needed help with. So I called the manufacturer and they said that their citronella collars don't work for dogs about 5 lbs and under. So I wouldn't recommend one for a small chihuahua. They are rather heavy and awkward too.
 

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Cooper said:
This is an article from the Dumb Friends League, a site I frequent often when I am trying to correct a behavior that Cooper decides to start up. I hope it helps!

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Recommendations:
• Teach your dog a “quiet” command. When he begins to bark at a passer-by, allow two or three barks, then say “quiet” and interrupt his barking by shaking a can filled with pennies or squirting water at his mouth with a spray bottle or squirt gun. This will cause him to stop barking momentarily. While he’s quiet, say “good quiet” and pop a tasty treat into his mouth. Remember, the loud noise or squirt isn’t meant to punish him; rather it is to startle him into being quiet so you can quickly reward him. If your dog is frightened by the noise or squirt bottle, find an alternative
method of interrupting his barking (throw a toy or ball toward him).

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Hmm, I learned that technique when I took one of my dogs to obedience classes years ago. It did NOT work, lol. This was a German Sheppard I had. At first, I would squirt him when he barked with a water gun and he would stop barking but he got hip to it. He got to the point that he would bark in order TO be squirted with the water gun. He made it into a game and would chase after the water. It was cute and funny but frustrating at the same time....he was a sweet boy though...hehe
 

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Lucky for me, Cooper's not a barker so I've never had to try that. The one thing I wish I could get him to stop doing is kissing. Some people don't like to be smooched, especially not on the lips, and he's a lover and wants to kiss everyone. I had him trained a while back where I'd say "Enough, Cooper" and he'd cease and desist but he's since convienently forgotten that command.

I guess he just wants to spread love and happiness, even to those that don't want it.
 

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With my JRT we had a "training" collar that had a buzzer and a shock button. We would mainly buzz Ernie for his barking and if he would not take the hint we would shock. Now before everyone starts getting mad at me...the shock had a level from 1-10 and you control it and we put it on a setting of 2 so he never had that much of a shock and that was only used in extreme cases. Ernie ended up getting so used to the buzz and too fat for the collar so we have gone down the path of a water bottle. We don't use a cute little spray bottle, we use a sport bottle and get him really wet...he has learned and now you pick up the bottle, even if it is to move it, and he stops dead in his tracks and sits and doesn't say or do anything.

Stewart mainly barks when he is around Ernie, so we have started hitting him with the blasts of water - he just shakes it off, he loves it! :lol:
 
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