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OK everyone this is very important and you need to beware of the risks you are taking if your vet gives your chihuahua Leptovirus.


Why? Leptospirosis is a bacterial rather than a viral disease. Consequently, the canine lepto shot is not a modified live virus vaccine, but is a chemically inactivated bacterium containing more potential antigens (individual disease units) capable of causing reactions. As in P.C.'s case, anaphylaxis does not occur after the first inoculation, but after the second or third when antibodies produced by the puppy's immune system become hypersensitive.

Allergic reactions are not the lepto shot's only drawback. Existing leptospira bacterium provide neither as high a level nor as long a duration of immunity as modified live canine vaccines. Of the four most common leptospirae known to infect dogs [L.canicola, L. icterohemorrhagiae, L. pomora and L. grippotyphosa], the lepto shot. currently available contains only two bacterium: L. canicola and L. icterohemorrhagiae. The primary immunization series, usually requiring three inoculations, provides only six months protection against the disease. Subsequent vaccination programs, normally based on annual boosters, are thus inadequate . A 1989 Tufts University study of 17 dogs with confirmed leptospirosis showed all 17 to be infected with L. pomona and L. grippotyphosa which are not currently included in lepto vaccines. Nine of the 17 dogs had been vaccinated against leptospirosis within the previous six months.

So please ask your vet; For a 5 way shot not a 7 way, the 5 way contains no Lepto and the 7 way does.
 

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Thanks for the important info!!! It took me a long time to find a Vet that had great knowledge of small breeds...especially chihuahuas. My Vet is extremely cautious and conservative when giving vaccinations. You just cant be to carefull... :)
 

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Good info KJ! I think this may have been what caused Callie's allergic reaction after her first booster. The vet didn't think it was because she reacted hours later but I'm still not so sure. She had a Parvo/Distemper booster today that they switched to a different kind of shot when they realized she had had an allergic reaction before. They also pretreated her with Benedryl.
 

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our vet is cautious about vaccines as well, but here in new jersey (in my area) there have been quite a few cases of lepto going on! so we are left with hard decicions to make, to vaccinate or not to vaccinate....... i even had to go for testing for lepto because this one dog i had to handle tested positive for it and since we didn't know about the lepto outbreaks that was the last thing on our minds that the dog had! lucky for me i came back negative.......

what would you gals do in my situation??? i'm torn between the vaccine on such a tiny baby and the actual disease itself being present in this area...
 

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Oh Wow!!!! That is a super tough situation. I would not even begin to know what to tell you. I did not realize Lepto was making a come-back???? Maybe the Vet Association will come up with a safer vaccine for the Chi breed??? That is also a little disturbing...Lepto is very serious. I also did not no it was contagious to Humans???

sandra
 

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what i got from the seminar on zoonosis is lepto is transmitted through urine...... there was sooo much during that seminar i only got bits and pieces of everything in my head but i took notes. i can try and get mroe info up tomorrow....
 

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Kylie is getting her shots this Friday and I asked my vet if they had the lepto in the booster...they said that is a seperate shot now (for that hospital) and you can only get the lepto if you ask for it. Apparently they know about the dangers and took action... :D
 

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here's one of many info sheets that i have.....

Leptospirosis


Leptospirosis [lep-to-spy-RO-sis] is a potentially serious bacterial illness that is most common in the tropics. Leptospirosis can affect many parts of the body.
Infected wild and domestic animals pass leptospirosis-causing bacteria in their urine.
People get leptospirosis by contact with fresh water, wet soil, or vegetation that has been contaminated by the urine of infected animals.
Leptospirosis is treatable with antibiotics.
To prevent leptospirosis, minimize contact with fresh water and mud that might be contaminated with the urine of infected animals.


What is leptospirosis?

Leptospirosis is a potentially serious illness that can affect many parts of the body.



What is the infectious agent that causes leptospirosis?

Leptospirosis is caused by Leptospira interrogans, a corkscrew-shaped bacterium (spirochete).



Where is leptospirosis found?

Leptospirosis-causing bacteria are common worldwide, especially in tropical countries with heavy rainfall. Infected rodents and other wild and domestic animals pass the bacteria in their urine. The bacteria can live for a long time in fresh water, damp soil, vegetation, and mud. Flooding after heavy rainfall helps spread the bacteria in the environment.



How is leptospirosis spread?

People get leptospirosis by contact with fresh water, damp soil, or vegetation contaminated by the urine of infected animals. People who canoe, raft, wade, or swim in contaminated lakes, rivers, and streams can get leptospirosis. Leptospirosis is also a problem for people who work in contaminated flood plains or wet agricultural settings.

Leptospirosis bacteria can enter the body through broken skin and mucous membranes. The bacteria can also enter the body when a person swallows contaminated food or water, including water swallowed during water sports. Once in the bloodstream, the bacteria can reach all parts of the body and cause signs and symptoms of illness.



What are the signs and symptoms of leptospirosis?

Most infected persons have a mild to moderate illness that is like many other tropical diseases. Symptoms include fever, headache, chills, nausea and vomiting, eye inflammation, and muscle aches. In more severe cases, the illness can result in liver damage and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes), kidney failure, and internal bleeding. People who are seriously ill with leptospirosis often need to be hospitalized.



How soon after exposure do symptoms appear?

Symptoms usually begin about 10 days after infection.



How is leptospirosis diagnosed?

Leptospirosis is diagnosed by a special blood test that is available through state health departments.



Who is at risk for leptospirosis?

People who take part in freshwater recreational activities in areas where leptospirosis is common, especially during the rainy season or in times of flooding
Farmers, workers in rice fields, sewer workers, and others whose jobs involve contact with water or mud that is contaminated by animal urine, especially the urine of rodents
Veterinarians and others in contact with leptospirosis-affected animals


What complications can result from leptospirosis?

Severe or untreated leptospirosis can lead to organ system damage and, in rare cases, death.



What is the treatment for leptospirosis?

Leptospirosis is treatable with antibiotics. Treatment should be started as soon as possible. Severely ill persons might need intravenous antibiotic treatment and other supportive care.



How common is leptospirosis?

Mild leptospirosis is common in tropical countries where people have regular contact with fresh water and animals. The disease is under-diagnosed in the United States. The 50 to 150 cases reported each year are probably only a fraction of the total number of infections.



Is leptospirosis an emerging infectious disease?

Yes. Increased awareness of the disease has led to increased recognition. In 1995, after widespread flooding in Nicaragua, a leptospirosis epidemic killed at least 13 persons and made more than 2,000 others sick. In 1997, nine whitewater rafters from the United States were infected during a river trip in Costa Rica. Leptospirosis is also a problem in deteriorating inner cities that are infested with rats.



How can leptospirosis be prevented?

Minimize contact with fresh water, mud, and vegetation that might be contaminated with the urine of infected animals, especially rodents.
Wear protective clothing, such as waterproof boots or waders, when participating in recreational or work activities that might result in contact with contaminated water.
If your travel plans might put you at risk for leptospirosis, consider taking antibiotics before and during travel to help prevent infection from short-term, high-risk exposures.


This fact sheet is for information only and is not meant to be used for self-diagnosis or as a substitute for consultation with a health-care provider. If you have any questions about the disease described above, consult a health-care provider.
 

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Thank you for all the info. I love the detail, I was a bacteriology major but this wasn't one I studied...I always find the emerging infectous diseases interesting...I'm odd that way :dontknow:

Thanks again...
Jessi
 

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omg, Bo my baby just had his 2nd shot, thank goodness he had no reaction, I talked to our vet and he thought because we live on some acreage that it would be best to give the shot. He did give Bo bendryl before the shot though.
 
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