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I feel as if I have the worse time trying to clip Peanut's and Cookie's nails. Peanut is still little, but he likes to squirm around a lot, and I am afraid to cut a nail to short. With him, I try to get a tiny amount cut off so he gets use to it. On the otherhand, Cookie is deathly afraid of getting her's cut. She will hide under the table, and once you start, she'll squirm even more than Peanut. She also begins to cry, without anybody even touching her nails. We usually have the vet cut Cookie's nails, but since she only goes for check-ups twice a year, we still need to do it besides then as well.

I was wondering if other people have this problem as well, and what you do to try to get this done. My uncle has the Pedi Paw thing for his dogs, but I keep forgetting to ask him if it really works.

:foxes15:
 

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We are having a similar problem with Ziva, here's what a trainer told me to do:
" Teaching them to calmly accept paw handling is a good first step, but there are many more steps that need to be done before actually clipping a nail BTW, saw a video recently about clipping rabbit
nails where the trainer clipped pieces of dry spaghetti to get the rabbit used to sound of the clippers... brilliant!

Many dogs are leery of having their feet messed with. I believe they are sensitive and concerned about being hurt or "trapped". It's not enough to just try to handle them regularly, you need to create a
positive association with having her feet touched. That usually means getting out the yummiest treats... a brief touch = a treat. Over time they learn to accept the touching (and later the trimming) to get the treats.

You also need to start very slowly and not expect her to tolerate too much at one time. That often means stroking down the leg to the floor when the dog is standing, then briefly pausing and cupping the foot (while it is firmly on the floor) as an introductory step. Do NOT just try to pick up a foot and hold it. When you get to lifting the foot, touch her shoulder first and slide your hand down her leg. Ask her to lift her foot (she has to shift her weight onto the other foot first) and then lift gently. You also need to learn how to hold the foot like you might hold a baby bird and to let your hand move with the foot if she pulls away a bit. These are subtle ways we engender trust rather than a reflexive escape behavior. Talk to her about what you intend to do and ONLY do what you have explained. Keep your foot interactions very brief, accompanied by yummy treats, and followed by a stress relieving energetic activity.

With puppies, at a minimum I recommend giving one treat for every snip. My dog is very cooperative about having his nails done, but I still give him several treats for each foot. This isn't a task they enjoy so I think we should pay them well for their willing cooperation With pups I might only do one nail a day until they become comfortable with the whole affair."
 

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I'm not gonna lie, for my three I do a 'no tolerance' approach. I don't baby talk them or try to get them to relax or anything. I have Robbie hold them firmly and I say a loud firm "No!" until they pretty much freeze and submit. They don't get hurt, it isn't cruel, but me simply *demanding* that they STOP squirming and they don't have a choice.
Once they realize I'm standing my ground; they stop moving very quick. And it only takes maybe 30 seconds to do each dogs nails. Then they get put down and I praise the he** outta them. Never once has this made them afraid of me or anything; as soon as we set them back down they bounce around happy as can be and lavish me with affection as if nothing ever happened.
Not that I don't agree with the slow method where you constantly praise and ease their way into it; but IMO a dog that struggles to get away from you and resists restraint is one that doesn't respect your position of alpha. Me demanding my position hasn't ever made them fearful or hesitant of me at all.. and it only took maybe 3 trimmings (I do them every 2 weeks to keep them short and the quicks back) of 'squirming' where I actually HAD to say 'No!' firmly until they completely submit now without even a troubled look lol. Kahlua and Eleanor don't think anything of it; they know when daddy picks them up that there's no point in struggling so they put up with it; and it's over in a matter of seconds! =) Gatsby's been a different case, but I think his previous owners have let him get away with everything. He screamed bloody murder the first time; but even then he got over it the simple moment he realized that *I* had authority over HIM. It's just a matter of not letting them get away with the behavior.
 

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Yes a huge thumbs up for Pedipaws!
I would be lost without ours.Its so much easier.
I took the orange cap off and it works so
much easier now.Dahlia always co-operates.
We got ours for $2.95 as the company has special offers too.
Get refills at the pet supply place.One paper lasted us 6 mos.
 

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In the nail trimming world I am with Kitty. I have 4 dogs, work and am a full time student in a very demanding profession. I simply don't have time to take weeks to months to beg my dogs or foster dogs to allow me to trim their nails. I do them every week to two weeks to keep them nice and short and the quicks short. I expect my dogs to allow me to do anything I need to do, from trimming nails, to anal gland expression. They don't have to love it but they have to tolerate it.

I simply lay my chihuahua in my lap on her back and clip away. It takes maybe a minute, at longest, to do all her toes. If I have one that struggles I just restrain them nicely but firmly until they stop squirming and then continue on with the trimming. If they vocalize I ignore it. If they are getting over-the-top-nutty I will tell them "No" or "Knock it off" or snag their muzzles so that they have to calm down and look at me. Then the trimming continues.

This is all based on the fact that this is how we live. I love my dogs, probably more than is healthy, but they are the dogs and I am a human. Sometimes you have to just bite the bullet and treat them like dogs. If I want to do something to them that isn't painful, just that they don't like it, then tough.

I do go slower if I have a dog that is honestly terrified but they still have to have it done. Most dogs, however, seem to just hate it and have learned that if they pitch a big enough fit the person will stop doing whatever it is they don't like.

When I am done they all get cookies, lots of love and pets. They are fine with it, it's just part of life.

Also, while I try to be careful, I do sometimes quick them. I don't react and just keep going. When I'm done I put quick-stop on the nail. If you freak out and act like it's the end of the world then they learn to act out even more if it happens again.
 

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I'm the same with the "no bones about it" nail trimming.

I do however pay to get Gretels done and I likely will with Godric also for the sheer socialization they get from it, but I can and have done it myself. I want them to be tolerant with people that aren't me.

The first time I took Gretel was dreadful, she cried and hollered and whined and the girl that was trimming was still learning come to find out and kept reacting poorly and scaring Gretel, she almost dropped her so, when the shop owner noticed she took her right away and did the all business approach and started singing at the top of her lungs whenever Gretel cried and ignoring her, eventually she stopped wiggling and crying and now she's fine.
 

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OMG doing CC's nails is horrible or was horrible lol. She would scream, attack me, freak out, complete drama queen lol!!! So we now take her to a groomer and it only $5 and she is very good for her lol!!! and it makes us feel alot better :)
 

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I tried the Pedi-paws and didn't like it. It took a while even with my chis' tiny nails, because it just wasn't that powerful. But my roommate as a Peticure...same principle as the other, just a different brand. She has pugs and they have notoriously hard nails, but the Peticure has enough power that it did a good job. After trying it out on my chis, I was sold, but I purchased a Peticure petite...just a smaller version which still has lots of power but it's easier to handle.

I'm with Olivia....my dogs don't like it, but they just have to deal with it. After a few seconds of squirming, during which I just let them know I mean business, they give up and submit lol! The only issue I have is with Tango's dew claws. He was a rescue at 7 months, and all his dew claws are intact. They're very hard to do.

For a while, I was taking my dogs to PetsMart and having their nails clipped there. It cost $9.00 and no appointment needed. I still sometimes take Tango there for his dewclaws if I get too frustrated. But now I just use the Peticure for them. I'm happy with the result. And after I'm done, my dogs get treats and praise!
 

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I'm not gonna lie, for my three I do a 'no tolerance' approach. I don't baby talk them or try to get them to relax or anything. I have Robbie hold them firmly and I say a loud firm "No!" until they pretty much freeze and submit. They don't get hurt, it isn't cruel, but me simply *demanding* that they STOP squirming and they don't have a choice.
Once they realize I'm standing my ground; they stop moving very quick. And it only takes maybe 30 seconds to do each dogs nails.
Yep! gotta go along with you. We have four, and also other animals, and all together they take so much time. Now they don't even start up when they see the clippers. They are comfortably resigned that the sooner I begin, the quicker it'll be over. lol
 
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