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Chi's are the longest-lived dog breed. Let's see: Simcha will be 2 years old in December, I will be 74 in a couple of weeks, and my wife is only 3 years younger than I. I recently had 'the talk' with my 40 year old son, and he has promised to take in Simcha if he outlives us. Such a very different concern than the dog we had while raising our children, who gave us 15 good years but died when we were still relatively young.

I will put some notes attached to our will. There is such a thing as an 'ethical will,' which has nothing to do with material items, but is in essence a set of moral imperatives we wish to leave to our heirs. Chi's are truly great pets for senior citizens, but their extreme potential longevity does create issues. Any thoughts, you older chihuahua-people out there?
 

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I think that's a great idea,at least it puts your mind at rest to know there's always a home for him,i asked my daughter if i got a tortoise a few years ago would she home her,as they can live 80/90 years.As i got the ok from her i went out a got one.I hope you all have many many happy years together.
 

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You are looking ahead and that is good! Just make sure that you have your wishes made known to your heirs and it sounds like you have. We see older chi's in shelters a lot because nobody wants to take the dog after its owners pass away which is so sad! I'm glad you are making plans, that is so responsible. Good for you!
 

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I am only 22, but I want to commend you for preparing for your pup just in case. I have a contingency plan in case I can't have Toby anymore or something happens to me (my mom wants to steal him now so it was easy for her to agree). Thank you for assuring that your dog will not end up in a shelter if something happens to you.

PS- my grandma just turned 86. Hopefully you'll be around for a longggg time.


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I think it's important to know (and let the person/persons) who will take care of your loved dog in case of anything bad happening, no matter how old you are (I am 24).
I asked my parents to take care of Rocky if anything should happen to me and my partner. I would just hate to not know what would happen to him if I wouldn't have asked anyone beforehand.
 

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Please do NOT attach anything to your Last Will & Testament - no glider clips, no staples, no pins, no nothing. Doing so can cause all sorts of major dramas because the Supreme Court can allege you must've had something else attached that could well have voided the will. That is why all Codicils etc. are separate documents.

Having seen so much disgusting and disturbing stuff happen when loved ones die, I fully intend to secure my dogs' supreme welfare by ..... oh god, I'm having a senior moment, forgotten the words entirely ..... "you want the money honey, you get only what's left after the dog is taken care of and the Trustees WILL be watching, inspecting and guaging for themselves". I'll fix this up via edit if my brain comes back to life later.
 

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Chi's are the longest-lived dog breed. Let's see: Simcha will be 2 years old in December, I will be 74 in a couple of weeks, and my wife is only 3 years younger than I. I recently had 'the talk' with my 40 year old son, and he has promised to take in Simcha if he outlives us. Such a very different concern than the dog we had while raising our children, who gave us 15 good years but died when we were still relatively young.

I will put some notes attached to our will. There is such a thing as an 'ethical will,' which has nothing to do with material items, but is in essence a set of moral imperatives we wish to leave to our heirs. Chi's are truly great pets for senior citizens, but their extreme potential longevity does create issues. Any thoughts, you older chihuahua-people out there?
It sounds like you have done what you need to make sure they are well taken care of. Sadly many people do not- I do rescue and a LOT of older dogs end up in shelters because their owners have died. Around here it is usually chis and toy poodles. I am much younger than you but we have made sure everyone knows where Kerri and Copley go if something happens to be and my spouse. One thing you might want to look into is how your heirs would pull the dog from animal control if you both had passed (or if you were ill and in the hospital for some reason) and the dogs ended up at the pound. Around here I have heard of people having a lot of trouble proving ownership to pull their loved ones dogs from the pound. Typically you actually need a second document naming them as co-owners and giving them privileges to pull them from the pound (you want to make sure you have their microchip #s and pictures of the dog with that document). There are legal firms that specialize in pet matters but it sounds like you have some good legal advise as you set up your will and I am sure they could help you with this. It is a simple thing that can save a lot of heartache in the end. Around here the person simply having power of attorney does not let them pull a dog from animal control but it does vary from state to state I am sure.
 

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Thank you from the bottom of my heart for doing this with your chis. I have rescued and re-homed 4 dogs that the owners had passed away or had been put in the nursing home. Most probaly thought their kids would take care of them. 3 of my girls are spoken for if something happens to us, it gives me comfort that if they outlive me they will get the love and care they deserve.

I agree with above poster, make sure that your son will have the authority to remove them from animal control if they end up there and also make sure that your vet knows the situation and that your son has the authority to take your dogs to the vet.
 
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