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Discussion Starter #1
Hello my fellow Chi enthusiasts.

I am turning to you for education.
I am looking at adding a second Chi to our little family and ran into a gorgeous little dog (retired show dog) that has been 'debarked'. I had NEVER heard about such a thing. How common is this practice & what are the effects on the dog?
Positive & negative feedback encouraged.

Thank you all!
 

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It is generally regarded as a last resort before putting a dog up for adoption at best, or a cruel thing that should never be done at worst- depending on who you talk to.
It is illegal many places and difficult to find a vet who will do it. Some puppy mills debark certain breeds as a marketing thing- mostly shelties. That is horrible in my opinion. Many of the dogs debarked like that have long term issues with aspirating things into their lungs. If the procedure was done by a good vet there are not a lot of long term side effects other than only being able to bark a little. Most dogs who are debarked still have a quiet bark. Personally I think if it is the last resort, you have hired trainers and there is no choice other than re-homing then it is something that may need done, but in most cases people are just debarking out of convenience.

As far as adopting I would adopt a dog that had been debarked without much worry and I have had a foster that was debarked by her previous owner. There is a possibility of long term health issues depending on how it was done, but the risk is not too high if they have been checked out by a vet recently and didnt just have the surgery. There are often unknowns with adopting and this is not a big issue in my opinion.

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Discussion Starter #4
It is generally regarded as a last resort before putting a dog up for adoption at best, or a cruel thing that should never be done at worst- depending on who you talk to.
It is illegal many places and difficult to find a vet who will do it. Some puppy mills debark certain breeds as a marketing thing- mostly shelties. That is horrible in my opinion. Many of the dogs debarked like that have long term issues with aspirating things into their lungs. If the procedure was done by a good vet there are not a lot of long term side effects other than only being able to bark a little. Most dogs who are debarked still have a quiet bark. Personally I think if it is the last resort, you have hired trainers and there is no choice other than re-homing then it is something that may need done, but in most cases people are just debarking out of convenience.

As far as adopting I would adopt a dog that had been debarked without much worry and I have had a foster that was debarked by her previous owner. There is a possibility of long term health issues depending on how it was done, but the risk is not too high if they have been checked out by a vet recently and didnt just have the surgery. There are often unknowns with adopting and this is not a big issue in my opinion.

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Annie,
Thank you so much for your reply. It is very informative and has been really helpful.
 

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I have seen this on tv and this is totally disgusting and abusive !!!! De-TALK humans instead...or put them down....OMG humans are my least favorite breed on this planet...

Sorry if this is harsh info, but I had to let it out..........
 

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I was looking at a chihuahua last fall to adopt, and that fell through. Hope that he went to a good home. About 5 months ago I was offered a retired show dog, and fell in love with her round little self. I was told she had been de-barked, did not blame the owner, she may have come to her that way. She is a double coated little one, and I took her home. She was kenneled at bedtime and that first night she grunted all night long. Spent the whole next day with her, teaching her to walk in the lawn (she had been an indoor only dog her whole 8 years. I finally resorted in placing a piddle pad outside to teach her where I wanted her to go and what I expected when I took her there.

The grunting after that was only used when she was trying to get my attention. We bonded easily and quickly (I have terminal cancer and she was intended to be a companion for me, and my 14 year old works with her and feeds her each meal as when I am gone she will be his dog and they also have a strong bond so no trauma for her, and she will be able to offer comfort to the boy.

I figured she would ALWAYS be a grunt barker, but low and behold, when she is startled by a knock on the door or really needs to go out for potty she IS capable of giving out one sharp bark, but never tries for two. Kinda surprised me at first, but if she figured out how to do it, I will just accept it, no correction, no praise. She has a right to communicate when she needs to I suppose.

I personally think it is not a nice thing in order to stop a behavior that can be trained out of them, but I CAN understand how some people will resort to it. As for me and my baby, we love each other, and we take care of each other. She goes shopping with me and sits on the foot rest of the electric cart, and never budges from it. One exception to that has been if I got up to get something off of a shelf, lost balance and fell. She is off that cart, and on me, keeping people at a distance while I get myself up and back to the cart. She protects me
 
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