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Do your Chi's have fleas, or have they had fleas? Vida has them right now, and it is so sad. She can't do anything without stopping to scratch. She is scratching constantly. This started about a week and a half ago. I found fleas on her and I immediatly Gathered all bedding and put it in the washer. Then vaccumed, and then gave her a bath. I used flea shampoo, and left it on for 5 minutes. I found only a few fleas in the water. All that didn't make much of a difference. The next day there were just as many fleas on her. A few days later I gave her another bath with the flea shampoo, and then put flea powder on her and a flea collar. That didn't do anything.

I found like 5 fleas on her belly the other morning and instead giving her a bath in the kitchen sink, I decided to give her a full bath, so she could soak in the water and hopefully the fleas would drowned. I did the flea shampoo also, and this actually worked for the rest of the day. She hated the bath, but later in the day was thanking me becuase she was happy she wasn't having to scratch so much. But, the next day they were back.

I have tried just the flea powder and of course that doesn't do anything. At this point I don't really know what to do. I know I need to get her some kind of treatment, but I also know that that won't work if the fleas are still in our house. Our vacuum broke two days ago, and we don't know when we will be able to fix it.

I feel so bad for Vida, and the fleas are even getting on me now and botthering me. I guess I know what I need to do, but I am wondering what kind of treatments you have used. We will probably buy some treatment for her. Then borrow my mom's vacuum, and then wash all the bedding. We might even do a fogger or something.

I am also wondering if your fleas have ever gone away on there own. It is starting to get colder, so that might make them stay as larvae. We would have to treat the house at some point still, but not right away.

She has had fleas before, but they have always just gone away with the baths and powder. What are your experiences with fleas?
 

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Cooper has never had fleas and the only thing I've put on him is an all-natural shampoo that repels them. Oddly enough, I have never even tried topical flea meds on him, even though he's outdoors and in wilderness-type areas all the time. And he'd definitely have them by now, I'm sure.

I read something once that said you have to vacuum your house, top to bottom - including baseboards and corners, couches and chairs... everything before you will ever get them out of the house. They also said to empty the vacuum bag once you're done so the little buggars can't climb back out.

I also know a lot of people that have much better results using all natural things to get rid of fleas and other pests in general - I'm not an all-natural kind of gal but I'd suppose the fleas and bugs are probably becoming immune to the sprays and "bug killers" we have on the market today. You may give a call down to a nursery or your local Home Depot and see if they have anything all-natural to put on your pup and in your house to deter the little critters.

Good luck!! :D
 

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cosmo and vienna had a few fleas when i collected them .....i washed them with a flea shampoo , and since they were 4 months i started frontlining them and i haven't seen a flea since :wave:

kisses nat
 

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I use Frontline Plus on my girls and have never had any problem.
When I had my Rotties (before Frontline and other things like it was invented) I battled fleas for a few years.

Here is part of an article from http://www.uky.edu/Agriculture/Entomology/entfacts/struct/ef602.htm

Ridding a home of fleas can be a frustrating and costly endeavor. Unlike some pests encountered around the home, fleas cause discomfort and irritation to both pets and people. Fleas account for more than half of all dermatological conditions requiring veterinary assistance, and even a single flea bite to a hypersensitive animal or person may cause intense itching and irritation.

For successful flea control, the home, pet and oftentimes, the yard must be treated. Yet the manner in which these treatments are performed can greatly influence the results. The following information will help frustrated pet owners effectively rid their homes and pets of fleas.

Essential Facts About Fleas
Adult fleas (the biting stage seen by pet owners) spend most of their time on the animal, not in the carpet. This is why treatment of the pet in conjunction with the pet's environment is an essential step in ridding a home of fleas.

Adult fleas lay all of their eggs (up to 50 per day) on the pet. However, the eggs soon fall off the animal into carpeting, beneath the cushions of furniture, and wherever else the pet rests, sleeps or spends most of its time. This is where homeowners should focus control measures.

After hatching, flea eggs develop into tiny, worm-like larvae. Larvae remain hidden deep in carpet fibers, beneath furniture cushions and in other protected areas. The larvae feed mainly on adult flea feces (dried blood) which accumulates, along with the eggs, in pet resting and activity areas.

Before becoming adult fleas, the larvae transform into pupae within a silk-like cocoon. Pupae remain inside the cocoon for 2 to 4 weeks, sometimes longer. The cocoon is resistant to insecticides and this is why some adult fleas are seen for an extended period, even after the home and pet are treated.

Treatment of Premises
If you neglect to treat the pet's environment (the premises), you will miss more than 90% of the developing flea population -- the eggs, larvae and pupae. If the pet spends time indoors, the interior of the home should also be treated. Before treatment, the pet owner should:



1. Remove all toys, clothing, and stored items from floors, under beds, and in closets. This step is essential so that all areas will be accessible for treatment.

2. Remove pet food and water dishes, cover fish tanks, and disconnect their aerators.

3. Wash, dry-clean or destroy all pet bedding.

4. Vacuum! -- vacuuming removes many of the eggs, larvae and pupae developing within the home. Vacuuming also stimulates pre-adult fleas to emerge sooner from their insecticide-resistant cocoons, thus hastening their contact with insecticide residues in the carpet. By raising the nap of the carpet, vacuuming improves the insecticide's penetration down to the base of the carpet fibers where the developing fleas live. Vacuum thoroughly, especially in areas where pets rest or sleep. Don't forget to vacuum along edges of rooms and beneath furniture, cushions, beds, and throw rugs. After vacuuming, seal the vacuum bag in a garbage bag and discard it in an outdoor trash container.
Insecticide Application - Once fleas become established in a home, insecticides are almost always needed to control them. Always read and follow label directions on the insecticide container. Other than the person performing the application, people and pets should be out of the house during treatment. People and pets should also remain off treated surfaces until the spray has dried. This may take several hours, depending on carpet type, ventilation and method of application. Opening windows and running the fan or air conditioner after treatment will enhance drying and minimize odor.

Many different products are available for home treatment. The most effective formulations contain both an adulticide (e.g., permethrin) effective against the biting adult stage, and an insect growth regulator (methoprene or pyriproxyfen), necessary to provide long-term suppression of the eggs, larvae and pupae. Pet owners will need to carefully read the “active ingredients” panel on the product label to determine if these ingredients are present. Examples include Raid Flea Killer Plus(R), Siphotrol Plus(R), , Bio Flea Halt(TM), and Fleatrol(R). Most homeowners will find aerosol formulations easier to apply than liquids. Moreover, aerosol products which can be dispensed by hand -- and thus directed under and behind beds, furniture, etc. -- tend to be more effective than “foggers” or “bug bombs” which are indiscriminately set off in the center of a room. It is essential that the application be thorough and include all likely areas of flea development. Carpets, throw rugs, under and behind beds and furniture, and beneath cushions on which pets sleep should all be treated. Pay particular attention to areas where pets spend time or sleep, as these will be the areas where most flea eggs, larvae and pupae will be concentrated. For example, if the family cat sleeps within a closet, or hides under the bed, these areas must be treated or the problem will continue. Hardwood and tile floors generally do not require treatment, but should be thoroughly vacuumed.

Expect to see some fleas for 2 weeks or longer following treatment. Provided all infested areas were treated initially, these "survivors" are probably newly emerged adults which have not yet succumbed to the insecticide. Instead of retreating the premises immediately, continue to vacuum. As noted earlier, vacuuming stimulates the insecticide-resistant pupae to hatch, bringing the newly emerged adults into contact with the insecticide sooner. Flea traps, such as those utilizing a light and glue board to attract and capture adult fleas, can be helpful but will not eliminate a flea infestation unless used in combination with other methods. If adult fleas continue to be seen beyond 2-4 weeks, retreatment of the premises (and pet) may be necessary.


Please click on the link and read the whole article!
 

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D' LAMINENE!!!! it is the best flea shampoo out there!!!!!!!!! (spelling is probably wrong lol but if you google it you'll find it and the right way to spell it too lol)

don't "bomb" your house! bombs suck! instead use a "fogger" (we like the raid foggers best) when we moved here there was a horrible flea problem in our yard! we used the "adams" brand yard treatment (a few times) we fogged and shampooed the dogs then got them started on frontline plus. we never had a problem again (that is until i worked at a dirty kennel for a month and brought home fleas grrrr.... but again we did the same things and the problem is gone) since then we switched to revolution instead of the frontline cause it's cheaper to use the revolution and treat internal and esternal parasites in one whereas we had to do heart guard and frontline..... all bedding should be washed in the hottest setting, and vaccuum everything.
 

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fleas

This year is a horrible flea season and I have used everything and the only thing that really works is Frontline or Advantix and you need to buy it from a vets office or it is not guaranteed and sometimes if you buy it from other places it does not have the same ingredients. Also you will have to treat your house for fleas. The best way to do so is to vaccum then spray or flea bomb and then vaccum again and immediately empty vaccum cleaner. The vaccuming will wake the flea eggs and allow you to kill those as well and then the second vaccum should pick up any fleas that are left over. I would also suggest treating your yard if you are with an organic treatment. Fleas season is about over but if you dont take care of them now then they will just rehatch next year or as soon as it gets warm enough in your house again. I hope this helps
 

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:wave: Flea and Tick Shampoo and a Flea and Tick collar on mine worked. Good luck. A few years back, we had to bomb the house because we somehow got ticks in the house in the carpet. That took care of the problem.
 

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I hate fleas!! When my dogs became invested with them shortly after moving to California I asked my vet for help and she prescribed Frontline. I'm happy to say since using Frontline I've never seen another flea. Advantage is another product prescribed by vets but I don't believe it's waterproof like Frontline is. :lol:
 

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I have never had any luck in the past with any type of "store bought" flea products, and in my opinion the flea collars are just a waste of money.

I started using Advantage right after I got Tia several years ago, as she was heavily infested with fleas when I brought her home. I've been using it ever since and have not had any problems at all with fleas. I've only seen one flea on Jazzy and that was when I brought her home from the breeders.

You will need to treat your house and carpet in order to get them under control, and possibly your yard also. When I lived in the country years ago, before products such as Frontline and Advantage, we got a really bad infestation of fleas in the house. We finally had to have a commercial pest service treat the house and yard in order to get rid of them.
 

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Two words.... Frontline Plus! I live in the Midwest and the fleas/ticks here are terrible!!!! I had tried all the store bought flea and tick shampoos, collars, powders. sprays, ect., but none of them ever really seemed to take care of the problem for very long. Seems like they would just come right back within a day or two. Our problem with fleas and ticks ended almost immediately once we began using Frontline Plus. Frontline Plus is definately more expensive than the store bought remedies, but it is well worth cost. There is nothing worse than watching your baby suffering from flea infestation or tick bites. You can purchase it online or at your vets office. I would highly recommend you try it!

Nine - Mommy to Milo
 

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Sometimes its so hard to tell if they even have fleas!

I admit I have never really had to worry about it before since I only had Keera for awile (and she is mostly hairless).

But I checked Amber's bum tonight and say a few blck specks that looked a bit like flea dirt...but I mean they could have been dirt dirt too.. She hasn't been itchin gliek crazy or anything. So I gave her a little bath with some gentle antibacterial soap. The dirt is gone.

She is due for a vet exam/shots etc. So I am going to frontline her. Does anyone know if there are any problems of this being dangerous for such tiny dogs? (she is 3 lbs) I have heard of pets almost dieing from getting overmedicated with this stuff.
 

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BlueMo0nz said:
Sometimes its so hard to tell if they even have fleas!

I admit I have never really had to worry about it before since I only had Keera for awile (and she is mostly hairless).

But I checked Amber's bum tonight and say a few blck specks that looked a bit like flea dirt...but I mean they could have been dirt dirt too.. She hasn't been itchin gliek crazy or anything. So I gave her a little bath with some gentle antibacterial soap. The dirt is gone.

She is due for a vet exam/shots etc. So I am going to frontline her. Does anyone know if there are any problems of this being dangerous for such tiny dogs? (she is 3 lbs) I have heard of pets almost dieing from getting overmedicated with this stuff.
i was using it on chiwi (when she was barely 2 pounds) i felt comfortable with the decision to put that on her, but i eventually switched her to revolution since i can't get this girl to eat the heartgueard or interceptor. the one vet likes revolution a lot for small dogs but not on large dogs.
 

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My vet told me to wait until my girls were 2 pounds to start them on Frontline Plus.
 

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Ms_P said:
My vet told me to wait until my girls were 2 pounds to start them on Frontline Plus.
we got the go ahead straight from the doctors at merial when they came to talk about new products. it's when they were just starting to change the weights on the packaging. they said that they did enough testing and found it to be safe enough even for my 1.6 pound puppy chi. i believe it used to be 10-22 pounds or something like that but now it's up to 22 pounds...

this is the weights that frontline plus comes in now (taken from their website):

FRONTLINE Plus is available in one dosing size for cats but is administered according to the weight of your dog in four dosing sizes: up to 22 lbs., 23–44 lbs., 45–88 lbs., and 89–132 lbs. FRONTLINE Plus is available in three-dose and six-dose packages.
 

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I'm glad they changed the wording on the package. It was certainly scarry giving a 2 to 5 pound dog a full dose when it said it was for 10-22 pounds.
 

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Ms_P said:
I'm glad they changed the wording on the package. It was certainly scarry giving a 2 to 5 pound dog a full dose when it said it was for 10-22 pounds.
yeah i hear that, i only gave chiwi half a dose the first time, then a week later the animal hospital meeting included guest speakers and a dr from merial so i asked them and they said it's fine and they will be chnging packaging due to the testing and recent findings that is was safe... ect ect. i'd still use it but chiwi is so picky she isn't trying to take any heart worm meds lol. and i don't want to force something down her throat, if there was no revolution then i would do that...
 
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