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I got my little girl today! She is beautiful!! A teeny tiny short coat white girl (6months old) I will upload pics soon!

Couple of quick questions though...

-She is going outside to pee which is great. No accidents in the house at all as yet. However.....she is eating her own poo!! Is there anything I can do apart from scooping up the poo before she can get to it!!

-She cant sit and I have been trying to train her and Im not doing a great job! She only seems to want to stand on her back legs to every command i try. Ive tried bribing her with ham but am getting nowhere! Any tips???

-Lastly, she really hates going for walkies! She refuses to move at all. She actually doesnt mind putting her harness on but she is making me drag her along which I dont wanna do!

I know this will all take time but I would happily take any hints or tips :)
 

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I think you're rushing her,if you only got her today let her settle in first,let her get to know you,your house/flat If you drag her along she will get worse she is frightened it's all new to her and all too much ,why not just let her sniff round the garden and get the smells
 

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I think you're rushing her,if you only got her today let her settle in first,let her get to know you,your house/flat If you drag her along she will get worse she is frightened it's all new to her and all too much ,why not just let her sniff round the garden and get the smells
I know you are right. I was just so excited to let her see the neighbourhood and beacuse she is that bit older, i wanna make sure that I start training her soon ish.

She is my first chihuahua and im delighted :)
 

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Let her settle in, everything is new to her. Tulula will only sit on carpet not on anything else, and I had to bribe her with treats to walk her, just be patient. Tulula is 2 years and still hates walks lol
 

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Welcome and congratulations!! She will probably learn before you even know it! Someone had suggested freeze dried chicken for training. It works great! But then, Angel is very food motivated and my golden is not! I make their biscuits, so when I have a small piece of dough left, I roll it very thin and with a pizza cutter, I cut tiny squares and bake them. They make perfect training treats because they are small and he is happy to get one!

Another thing you might try, is to put her on the couch for training. My friend has a dog wash and lends her space to a dog trainer for evenings. The trainer tells people with small dogs to put them on a couch to learn commands. It works well!

Good luck. She will learn!;)
 

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llearned on a couch is great. Get her in the corner, have a tiny piece of chicken/whatever in your hand. Show her the treat, which you hold right above her nose, and slowly raise the treat. She will 'track' the treat with her eyes and should sit. As soon as she does, she gets the treat. Repeat several times. Soon she should sit when you give the raised hand signal. (palm up) I do agree, though, lets give her a couple of days to get the lay of the land. About the poop---just pick it up asap.! Good luck. Sue
 

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Two ways to stop the poop eating. I used pineapple juice on their food, it worked very well. Use it on every meal, just a little bit, for two weeks. It makes the poo taste awful. Also putting a little meat tenderizer on it works, too.
 

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Also with the walking, I had a few that took forever to get them used to walking. You must have patience. I would take them out in the their harness and do nothing. After a while, they would want to explore and I would just follow them around with a loose leash. After days of this, they would finally feel bold enough to walk off and I would be able to tighten up the leash and begin to guide them. Dragging is not a good thing, really.
 

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Congrats! Can't wait to see some pics :) I do the treat right in front of the nose and then back to get them to sit, as someone already suggested. Some dogs dont seem to get it though and will try to turn around rather than sit. Sometimes a light push/pressure on their bum as you raise the treat back over their nose helps them get it. I'd leave her harness on her with leash attached in the house and let her get used to being on it, then gradually move to you holding it while she goes wherever she wants, and progress that way. Lucky you that she's so clever at housebreaking already!
 

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Give her a day or two to settle in first. Also, if she's standing on her back legs a lot, there's a good chance that you're trying to train her while standing up. Get on the floor with her and keep your hands at her eye level.

Here's a good way to train "sit" once she's more relaxed:

Step 1: Capture the behavior of sitting and add the word "Sit"
Hold a closed fist with food inside infront of her > Say "Sit" as soon as her bottom touches the ground > Open your hand and give her the treat

Hold a piece of good-smelling food in your hand. Show it to her, then close your fist around it. Hold your closed fist infront of her and let her smell it. She should be very interested in your hand--sniffing, pawing at it, maybe getting frustrated a little. At some point she will sit down. As SOON as her bottom touches the ground, say "Sit" (say only this word--not her name, don't repeat it, nothing) and immediately give her the treat. Repeat 10 times or until she is doing it reliably. Inbetween sets you can toss the treat a foot or so away so she has to stand up to go get it, thus putting her in the correct position to sit again.

Limit training time to 15 minutes a session, with several sessions a day. Treat sizes should be smaller than your fingernail. She may need to potty immediately after training.

***Step 2: Teach her to listen to the word "Sit" instead of focusing on the treat in your hand
Present your closed fist to her again (this time without a treat in it) > Say "Sit" > Wait until her bottom touches the ground > Say "Good!" as soon as it happens > Show her your empty hand and give her the treat from the other hand

The next step is to take the food out of your cue hand (the hand you are showing her). At this point she should know what the word "Sit" means. Say "Sit" with your (empty) closed fist infront of her. Wait a few seconds--she should eventually sit because it's worked before. The treat should be held in your opposite hand, behind your back. When she sits, say "Good!" immediately, show her that the treat is not in your closed fist, and bring out the treat from behind your back to give to her. (This teaches her not to just follow your hand blindly, but instead pay attention to what the hand cue is telling her.)

***Step 3: Pair a hand gesture with the "Sit" verbal command
Say "Sit" while performing the hand gesture/sign language of your choice > Say "Good" as soon as her bottom hits the floor > Give her a treat from your opposite hand

The final step, once she is doing Step 2 and reliably responding to the WORD "Sit," is to turn your closed fist into whatever hand signal you want to mean "Sit." My mom makes an "L" shape with her thumb and index finger, but you can pick whatever you want--just be consistent! Dogs watch us more than they listen to us, so body language (including hand cues) is a great tool. The hand that you feed her from should be behind your back where she can't see it.

*** If at any point she isn't getting the training 2-3 times in a row, go back a step and build up to it again.

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What I like about this method is that it forces the dog to think and reason. "I can smell that treat in there. Why won't she give it to me? This is so frustrating. -- Wait, sitting makes her give me a treat? Is that what does it? I'm going to keep doing THAT!" If you lure a dog into sitting (by lifting the treat above their head so they look up and automatically sit) or force them to sit by pushing them (hoping for muscle memory to kick in), the dog isn't THINKING about what they're doing. They're either being forced or they're blindly following a treat without any planning needed.

And this isn't just about the "Sit" behavior. Training your dog like this at a young age creates an adult dog that is able to figure out complex puzzles because they've already been taught to explore their options and think logically about the situation.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the help guys. Appreciate it. Ive only had her about 14 hours and Im totally in love already!
 

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As far as poo eating goes.. sometimes this is because of nutrient deficiencies (the dog is trying to get nutrients from its poo that it lacks in its diet), but more often than not it's a learned behavior from being in a whelping box or playpen that was too small for the litter. Sometimes it's just out of boredom or because it tastes good!

The best thing you can do is keep trying to remove the poo before she can get to it. You can also teach her the "leave it" command. But the fewer times she can practice the behavior, the less prominent it will be as she grows up. Gradually she'll grow out of it.


To get her used to walking on a lead, put on her harness and leash and carry her outside. Set her on the ground where you want her to relieve herself, and afterwards let her explore for a minute or two by following her around on the leash. Don't try to guide her (except to keep her out of the street or away from something dangerous, obviously). When you're done, carry her back inside.

When she is used to the harness and you want to teach her to follow YOU, take some treats with you outside (something like deli meat works really well for this). Give her one treat, then call her name and walk a few steps. When she follows, give her another treat. Change directions randomly, and treat her each time she follows you. Try to change speeds--going at a jog or slowing down a lot, and give her a treat for keeping up with you. Do this for just 5 minutes a day every time you go out and she'll see following you on the leash as a positive thing. :)
 
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