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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been trying to bring my chis onto a raw diet. This morning I fed a small raw meetball and some giblets (it is the organ they take out of the neck or behind the mouth of the chicken where it stores its seed). I forget what they call it.

Anyway, Gracy, my almost 3 year old chi threw it all up. My 5 month chi kept it down.

So later this morning I gave Gracie a whole chicken leg which she devoured bone and all. She got a little excited when one of the workers came and threw a little of it up but she licked up the small mess.

If you were me and you weighed out the food for your chi, and your chi was 6.5 lbs and the other 4 lbs how much meat would you feed them?

I've heard the young one could get as much as 10% to 20% of its body weight per day?

So 4 lbs. x 16 ounces = 64 ounces x .1 = 6.4 ounces per day of meet.
The high end of 20% would be 12.8 ounces/day.

What do you think?

Tony
 

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Here is a raw calculator:

Calculate

If your 4 lb dog is a puppy, the calculator says she would get about 5 oz per day.

What kind of meat was the meatball? Usually you start out with only bone in chicken for 1-2 weeks... Nothing extra
 

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What did the meatball have in it?

Since you are just starting out, you should be feeding chicken ONLY at this stage. Just chicken meat and bone. No giblets or other meats. You can add those in later, but not now.

Raw is nutrient dense and you don't feed much at all. This takes some getting used to. One ounce is about the size of an ice cube, or about a tablespoon. Not much food at all. I recommend getting a 16 ounce cornish hen and then whacking it up into 8 pieces of bone and meat chunks. Those would be about 2 ounces each. 2 ounces is a MEAL for a normal sized chi.

Here's a raw calculator to help you estimate how much to feed ....

Calculate

For comparison, Brody is very active. He's an adult. He weighs 5 pounds. He eats about 2 ounces twice a day. A typical day is about 4-5 ounces of food. If you weight that out, that's not much at all, but it is adequate.

20% of body weight would be wayyyyyyyyyyyy too much food. A typical adult chi eats between 2-4% of their body weight daily, depending on their condition and their activity.

It sounds to me like you are overfeeding. I would cut back the amounts. I would NOT to whole chicken legs (too much bone and too much food). I would not add in other meats or organs at this point.
 

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No, I would not feed hamburger. You can do some beef LATER. For the first two weeks at least, you should be doing bone-in chicken. I have already posted my opinion on using chicken legs. I think the bones are too big and too hard for most chi's. I recommend starting off with cornish hens because they have smaller, easy to chew and handle bones and it's easy to chop up into the right pieces so you don't overfeed.

If you insist on using chicken legs, as I have said before, I would ribbon the meat, and let the dog eat off the knobby ends of the bones where the bones are softer and have more cartilage. I wouldn't let them consume the entire leg bone. That's way too much bone. It's very easy to over-do when bone is only 10% of the diet.

In my opinion, I would back up and do chicken ONLY as I said before. Consider using wings or backs or breasts. Most all of the chicken would be fine, EXCEPT THE LEGS, because of the bone content and the size/weight of the bones.

No beef, no giblets, no extras. Just chicken meat and bone ONLY for now and in small amounts. Don't overfeed. There is plenty of time for variety later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
O.K. thanks! Chicken only it is! I appreciate the helpful advice and sure the dogs will also!
 

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O.K. thanks! Chicken only it is! I appreciate the helpful advice and sure the dogs will also!
Great!! You are off to a good start. Just don't get ahead of yourself and take it slow. :hello1:
 

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Follow Tracy's advice and you'll be on the right path. That's what I did and my 4 have been on prey model raw for about a year now; best thing I ever did for my pups!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Brodysmom, are you calculating your dog's weight at 5.0% using that on line calculator?

If I use 5.0% I arrive at about what you are feeding your dog per day.

Also, before I got Pepe and had Gracie on the standard high quality bagged dog food I would give her little bits of cantelope, watermellon etc. from time to time. Not often though. Do you at times give your dog cooked vegies or fruit?
 

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Yes, Brody eats about 5% of his weight a day, usually about 4 ounces. 2 ounces twice a day. He is at his ideal weight but it has been hard to keep weight on him. So I may back off just a bit so he doesn't gain more. It's taken a long time to get him beefed up - he was too thin for a long time because he is MR. Picky. ;)

Some dogs only eat 2%, some more, depending on age, weight, activity level, metabolism.

Dogs don't process fruits and veggies well. They mainly just pass on through. Having said that - sure, you can use them as an occasional snack. Just don't let it sneak up to more than 10% of the diet. But as a snack or treat - sure, why not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I just found this concerning organ meats for dogs:

RAW LIVER - give 2-3 pieces 3 times a week, or any other organ meat; heart, kidney or tripe. Dogs must have organ meat weekly – lack of taurine – an amino acid abundant in hearts will cause dogs to seizure.

Feed your dog
 

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That's sort of on the right track. Your dog SHOULD have organs, in fact its 10% of the diet. 5% of that should be liver. So take Brody for example, he eats 4 ounces a day. Times 7 days a week, that's 28 ounces. So 10% of that would be 2.8 ounces or round it up to 3 ounces. So once a week (or however you want to divide it), he should have 1.5 ounces of liver.

I didn't read through the link, but just from your quote above - I would question the advice to give liver 2-3 times a week - how much??? Giving it 3 times a week is fine, but be careful not to overdo it. And never give raw liver to a new-to-raw dog or you are guaranteed to have rocket butt. (Diarrhea).

Edit: Just read through the link. I am pleased to see that is Sylvia Hammarstroms site. She is the owner/breeder of Skansen Kennels, which is the most wonderful line of Giant Schnauzers in the world. She is a raw feeder pioneer. She was recommending raw diets 20 years ago. :) I absolutely LOVE her dogs!

Liver, kidney, and other organs are essential. They provide vitamins/minerals that are not in muscle meats. But they can also cause diarrhea and loose stools and tummy aches for dogs new to raw. That's why we put them LAST in the progression of raw feeding. First is chicken for 2 weeks, then you can slowly add in another protein (pork or beef is fine) ONE BITE at a time until they are fully onto the new protein. Feed that for a few days, then go to the next protein. Add in some chicken for bone content every few days if you are just doing meaty meals.

Organs usually end up in the diet about a month in. I recommend giving a finger nail sized sliver of liver with a bony meal such as chicken. Gradually increase.

I'm glad you are doing some research and reading TonyN! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I learned a new trick accidentally this morning!

Cutting chicken meat off the bone has been a chore for me. This morning the chicken legs were not completely thawed out from being frozen. I took a leg out and began cutting right down along the bone and it was soooo easy to cut! And the partially frozen chunks of meat were easy to cut for the dogs too.
 

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I learned a new trick accidentally this morning!

Cutting chicken meat off the bone has been a chore for me. This morning the chicken legs were not completely thawed out from being frozen. I took a leg out and began cutting right down along the bone and it was soooo easy to cut! And the partially frozen chunks of meat were easy to cut for the dogs too.
Great tip! :)
 
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