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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was reading up on hip dysplasia and it seems it is common in pugs. I guess the curly tail and bad hips is what he got from the pug side of the equation. And the articles say less exercise is best, but the vet said to walk him to build up muscle and now I'm confused. Anyone out there deal with loose hips and/or hip dysplasia and can tell me if he should or should not be exercised?
 

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We had a St. Bernard with it when I was growing up (12 years old) she exercised but did not exert herself. If we broke out the trikes (they didn't have quads back then) she had to go inside because she loved to chase us when we rode and if she did it would hurt her. So I am not sure if it applies to small breeds or if things have changed since all of the years have passed (too many years :foxes15:) ~ but exercise was great, non strenuous & no exertion ~ just to keep limber.
 

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My dog was born with a mild case of hip dysplasia. She was a Lab/Chow mix. She never needed surgery, and she didn't limp except a handful of times in her life. She did have very mild arthritis, but it didn't really affect her. She went on walks and would sometimes run when she was younger. She lasted well into her 17th year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
We had a St. Bernard with it when I was growing up (12 years old) she exercised but did not exert herself. If we broke out the trikes (they didn't have quads back then) she had to go inside because she loved to chase us when we rode and if she did it would hurt her. So I am not sure if it applies to small breeds or if things have changed since all of the years have passed (too many years :foxes15:) ~ but exercise was great, non strenuous & no exertion ~ just to keep limber.
Ok, thank you. I guess some moderate excercise is what's in order. The vet said that since he was so small, it shouldn't affect him really bad, but I don't want to exacerbate it by overdoing it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My dog was born with a mild case of hip dysplasia. She was a Lab/Chow mix. She never needed surgery, and she didn't limp except a handful of times in her life. She did have very mild arthritis, but it didn't really affect her. She went on walks and would sometimes run when she was younger. She lasted well into her 17th year.
Thank you, that is good to know. He shows no sign of pain, just really floppy in the back end. She tested him and said she didn't feel the hip fall in and out of the joint, so it may be very mild.
 

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He's so young I would wonder more about Legg Calve Perthes? I really don't see any Pug in Chumley, are you sure he has pug in him? I would guess more toward basenji before pug...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
He's so young I would wonder more about Legg Calve Perthes? I really don't see any Pug in Chumley, are you sure he has pug in him? I would guess more toward basenji before pug...
He has no signs of Legg Calve Perthes which are:
Clinical signs

Irritability
Chewing at hip of flank region
Progressive lameness (may take about 2 months until dog is not bearing any weight on limb)
Stiffness of affected limb (85 to 90% of dogs have only one hip affected)
Atrophy of muscles of affected limb
Pain when moving the hip - especially when extending the limb backward and also to the side
Crepitus or crunchy feel of the hip joint on range of motion


He shows no signs of pain, not even when the vet stretched his legs straight out behind him. No limping or hesitation at all and he jumps off the couch and does zoomies outside with no lameness.

As to being half Basenji, there is like one Basenji mix in all of Bakersfield. I would love it he was, I love Basenjis. He does talk like one, but does bark like crazy, too. Also both Basenjis and Chis are pricked ear breeds and his flop at the tips. He could be part Shiba Inu, but they are usually more foxy looking. The vet thought he is half pug, the shape of his hindquarters remind her of a pug. He would be a good one to do genetic profiling on. lol
 

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This is very common in GR's the best thing you can do is NOT exercise him until he is older. No long walks, no harsh exercise because it's bad for his joints while they are forming. In goldens the rule is at least 14 months before they can do agility or anything like that and 18 months before they could become a jogging partner.

I'm not sure of the ages for a smaller dog since they develop faster but since he is showing signs I would try -try being the key word- to keep him a bit quieter until at least 11 months. In goldens you even feed low calcium food so that they grow slower and their joints aren't strained.
 

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I was reading up on hip dysplasia and it seems it is common in pugs. I guess the curly tail and bad hips is what he got from the pug side of the equation. And the articles say less exercise is best, but the vet said to walk him to build up muscle and now I'm confused. Anyone out there deal with loose hips and/or hip dysplasia and can tell me if he should or should not be exercised?
I had 2 samoyeds that both had hip dysplasia. One did require surgery twice and 1 made it through life without anything more than a joint & hip supplement and just his everyday exercise. Nothing excessive. Weight control was also a big part of keeping him in good shape. They also both had orthopedic beds...not only because the fleece ones hold body heat which help the hips but because they made it easier for the dogs to get up after rest. I currently have a friend with a year old chihuahua who was diagnosed with hip dysplasia recently. It is a mild case that is causing looseness in his back and some leg discomfort. Currently he has started warm hydro therapy as an alternative to surgery. So far it seems to be going well. I guess exercise can be good for the dog as long as it is nothing excessive.

This is a link to the video of Murphy and his 1st therapy session. :
Facebook

If you want to see it and can't I'll download the video and send it to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
This is very common in GR's the best thing you can do is NOT exercise him until he is older. No long walks, no harsh exercise because it's bad for his joints while they are forming. In goldens the rule is at least 14 months before they can do agility or anything like that and 18 months before they could become a jogging partner.

I'm not sure of the ages for a smaller dog since they develop faster but since he is showing signs I would try -try being the key word- to keep him a bit quieter until at least 11 months. In goldens you even feed low calcium food so that they grow slower and their joints aren't strained.
I don't plan on doing anything strenuous with him. I was going to try to walk him twice a day but with my bad ankle, I don't know if I can walk him even that much.

I had 2 samoyeds that both had hip dysplasia. One did require surgery twice and 1 made it through life without anything more than a joint & hip supplement and just his everyday exercise. Nothing excessive. Weight control was also a big part of keeping him in good shape. They also both had orthopedic beds...not only because the fleece ones hold body heat which help the hips but because they made it easier for the dogs to get up after rest. I currently have a friend with a year old chihuahua who was diagnosed with hip dysplasia recently. It is a mild case that is causing looseness in his back and some leg discomfort. Currently he has started warm hydro therapy as an alternative to surgery. So far it seems to be going well. I guess exercise can be good for the dog as long as it is nothing excessive.

This is a link to the video of Murphy and his 1st therapy session. :
Facebook

If you want to see it and can't I'll download the video and send it to you.
It says the video is unavailable. I woud really love to see it. I will look into an orthopedic bed for his crate as, in the dog room, he sleeps only on the couch. So far I see no pain indicators at all either after playing or in the morning after sleeping all night. I did try to start him on a joint supplement, but he won't eat the chews I have so I will be looking for one that he will actually eat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I was looking up health problems of Basenjis and it looks like hip dysplasia is a problem with the breed. So, I may have a very unusual colored chi/Basenji mix. That's a whole different way of raising I need to focus on and explains his stubbornness and why he ignores my commands. And I guess until I figure out his hip problems, he'll be staying with me.
 

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svdreamer, I can not remember if I have you on my facebook so you have my apologies if I already do: My facebook is under Laura Belcher. I have linked the video to my page for you.
 
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