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Hi again... I just adopted another Chi. She is about 2 1/2 yrs old. She was abandoned, possibly abused and has been in a shelter for several months. She is not house broken AT ALL! :confused: And she has no idea what no means, with many BAD habbits (ex. barking) . I feel overwhelmed, and i dont know where to start, or how to go about training her.
Potty training is top priority... puppy pads are out (they are way to fun to shred!)
Please i have fallen in love with her... and she deserves a home.... i just need some help. Meet Gidget... :daisy:
 

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I'm sorry I really don't have anything that will help apart from love and time but i just wanted to say that she is adorable and well worth the work I can see why you love her, I'm sure there are some on here who will have great ideas to assist you.
 

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I would start by crate training to help with potty training. The crate should be just large enough for her to stand up, turn around, and lie down. Take her outside at regular intervals to potty and reward heavily. When she is out in the house keep her attached to you by a light leash so she can't wander off and potty elsewhere in the house.

What is she barking at? I would start with some positive training. When she starts barking you can call her to you and reward for coming and stopping the barking.

Since she came from a rough beginning go slow. Don't expect her to magically become the perfect dog in a week or month. Show her what you want and how to please you. But... don't dwell on her past! If you spend all your time feeling sorry for her you'll miss out on being able to help her. Shut the door on her past and move forward from here.
 

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I completely agree with OMGUTHRIE. I had planned to give the same advice. train her as if she is a 12 week old puppy starting fresh. She is older so "fingers crossed" hopefully she will learn a little faster.

You have done a wonderful thing for her. She is a doll.

I love her picture, full of life, full of love, full of mistief. She looks a titch guilty as if she was in trouble but whatever she did was well worth it.
 

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During crate training, does she sleep in the crate? should i wake up in the middle of the night to take her outside? Im not a stay at home mom, so what do i do while i am at work? ( my other dog uses the doggy door.)
She barks to try and play with my other female chi (who is a lazy princess, that wants nothing to do with it) and at just about everything else. the tv, the cars driving by, the wind, the stove when it kicks on.
Calling her to me is something im working on. she has been with me for a week, and she wants to come, but its like she talks herself out of it.. it takes about ten tries for her to even get close enough for me to touch her(which is a big improvement)... and you can forget about it if your standing or sitting. your have to be on the floor.
 

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She's gorgeous!! :)
Okay, where does she stay during the day? Night? How often is she left alone?
I wouldn't let her have full run of the house if she isn't trained. My year old girl is trained and does well but still has the occasional accident.
I would suggest something like this:
Amazon.com: Iris CI-604 Indoor/Outdoor Plastic Pet Pen, 4 Panels: Kitchen & Dining
This way she has access to bed/food/potty pad and you won't have to follow her all over the house worrying she's gonna potty. I still keep my chi in her pen during the night and times when i just need her to not be out running around. I keep it on a non carpeted floor(in my kitchen) She has never cried in it, it is her little "house". :) She has a crate as well in another room that she goes in and out of, i'm getting her used to it so we can just use it eventually.
I don't know your schedule but i would take her out every couple hours or when she seems to need to go out. Treat her every time she potties! There are cloth potty pads, i've never used them though but it may be an idea for you.
When she gets to barking too much i'd just give her a firm "NO bark!" or "ah ah!" and if she persists a poke in the rib with your finger..kind of like a mother dog would nip at her young to set them straight.
Also check this out for behavioral training, i've heard it works wonders.
NILIF Behavioral Shaping For Dogs
and finally come here often. :) We love pics and giving advice!!
 

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Thank you so much for rescuing Gidget. I have a house full of rescued dogs (just took in another foster yesterday), and yes it is a labor of love but soooo worth it to see how these remarkable little Chis respond with boundless love and gratitude. I agree with the advice from others. LOTS of structure and routine works for my pack--we are on a pretty strict schedule for feeding, exercise, play time, bed time, etc. I have a rigorous work schedule, so home schedules are important, too. We have clear boundaries in the house--everyone is treated pretty much equally and expectations are the same for all. That way the new ones learn from the "old" ones how to behave like a pack. I'm surely not a professional, but I've seen amazing transformation with my little rescue pack, including the abused ones. My Annie was fearful like Gidget. She spent her first few weeks in an exercise pen (of course I let her out supervised when I was home) with a place to do her business--she also didn't like potty pads but was okay with newspaper. I know this may be controversial, but that was the set up that worked for Annie and gave her confidence. Plus the power of love and lots of love--total acceptance. She still stays in her pen when I'm at work, but now she is an awesome girl who actually PLAYS with the other dogs and me, and she approaches me all the time. She can still be skittish at times (like when she knows she's getting medication!), but the improvement is remarkable. I did not have barking issues with Annie, but Gidget may have been "rewarded" for her barking in her previous life. Let her know you do not approve, and be consistent. That worked with my Olivia--she barked at any and all big dogs--somewhere she was allowed to think this was good behavior. Now she is learning that Mommy is extremely disappointed with the barking ("Olivia, NO! Bad girl"). And Olivia is smart enough to pick up on just verbal reprimands. The barking still happens here and there, but it's been going down. So do invest the time and effort in Gidget--she will be worth it.
 

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She is adorable. I have two black and tans and one tri. My newest, Delilah, came about the same way yours did. She learned to go outside by me catching her pottying and telling her no and taking her outside. My dogs are only in one room, a huge family room with tile floor. I have a dog door with no flap as it came this way and I haven't yet found a replacement flap. She watched the other dogs go out and within a little bit, she was house broken. As to her barking, I use a spray water bottle. As soon as she starts barking or growling inappropriately, I say "no bark" or "no growl" and hit her with the water. She's not that scared or respectful of the water, but it's all I have. Slowly, she is getting better at the barking. To teach her to come no matter if you are standing or sitting, put her in a harness with a long lead on it. Call her and, I'm sorry, it sounds awful, but drag her gently over to you and give her a high quality treat like chicken or cheese. It will only take very few times usually before she will willingly come running up everytime you call. Then slowly faze out the treats. That pen mentioned by cherper (Cheryl) works wonders! I love mine. You could either pen her in that when you work or in a bathroom. Maybe instead of a pee pad, since she shreds them, use a grass potty or liter box.
 

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As far as the crate training goes, any time you can't watch her like a furry little felon she should be in the crate or on an umbilical (leash tied to you so she goes where you go). I don't know if it's possible for you to come home at noon and let her out, but eight hours plus is a long time to go without a potty break (us middle-aged ladies know this LOL). Also, if possible, shift your sched. so she can go out very late and very early (11 p.m. and 6 a.m., for instance). The barking's a tough one - we did have one dog we taught to "whisper" - she would do a little sotto voce bark instead of a loud bark. Gidget's just a doll...markings like my Pablo...good luck with her!
 

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Thank you all for the advice.... She is really wonderful... She learned how to use the dog door in less than 15min. She already knows how to SIT, and LAY DOWN. Still workin on the potty training tho. But i have not picked up poop in two days! Peeing on the otherhand..... Oiy Vay. But it will come with time... Barking is still an issue, now my other chi joins in.. lol Thanks!
 

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Please do not 'drag' your rescue dog to you. I know how trying it is, but dragging her to you may make her frightened. Instead, try a clicker. Sit on the floor, or couch and click and throw her a treat (tiny one) and slowly throw it closer and closer to you. Finally hold it in your hand. May take weeks, but slowly is better. I had a rescue chi that NEVER came to me of her own violition in the 3 years I had her. Puppy mill breeder. She did come in storms, and if she was sick or hurt. Sue Davis
 

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I would start by crate training to help with potty training. The crate should be just large enough for her to stand up, turn around, and lie down. Take her outside at regular intervals to potty and reward heavily. When she is out in the house keep her attached to you by a light leash so she can't wander off and potty elsewhere in the house.

What is she barking at? I would start with some positive training. When she starts barking you can call her to you and reward for coming and stopping the barking.

Since she came from a rough beginning go slow. Don't expect her to magically become the perfect dog in a week or month. Show her what you want and how to please you. But... don't dwell on her past! If you spend all your time feeling sorry for her you'll miss out on being able to help her. Shut the door on her past and move forward from here.
Great advice. Welcome to your darling little girl. It's so sad that this beautiful animal that was probably so carefully brought into the world finds themselves in her situation. So glad you adopted her. She is beautiful.
 
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