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Discussion Starter #1
I was browsing the web looking for interesting stuff about chis and I found this article that I think it's great. We should all keep an eye on our babies' teeth and take them to the vet if we notice something wrong. I am taking Sally Lolita to the clinic tonight cus I think she might have some retained baby teeth. She is 5 months old and it's the time her adult teeth are coming out so I hope they can tell me what to do.

Malocclusions: Teeth that don’t erupt correctly

In addition to trauma, the second most common dental problem seen in young dogs and cats are adult teeth that erupt improperly. This condition is due to either trauma, as previously mentioned, or the presence of persistent baby teeth. Normally, as the permanent tooth erupts, it does so directly under the root of the deciduous (baby) tooth causing it to break down, which then allows the adult tooth to push it out. Sometimes the bud of the permanent tooth is not directly positioned under its deciduous counterpart. This improper positioning causes the permanent tooth, during its formation, to glide off the baby tooth root and erupt abnormally. The ensuing malpositioned adult tooth traumatizes the soft tissue in the mouth, causing the pet pain and possible subsequent infection. In addition, food often becomes trapped between the baby tooth and adult tooth causing the development of gum infections. The golden rule to follow is: There should never be two of the same tooth type occupying the mouth at the same time. By frequently checking your pet’s teeth between the ages of 14 to 24 weeks of age, any double presence of teeth will be detected and can be immediately corrected by a veterinarian. Never wait for the baby tooth to fall out by itself if you see even the slightest protrusion of the adult crown next to it. If the adult teeth are coming in incorrectly, then a Veterinary dentist should be consulted as soon as possible to prevent further complications.

The teeth that are most often affected by the presence of retained baby teeth are the small front incisors and the canine or fang teeth. The lower fang teeth usually come in towards the inside of their deciduous (baby) counterparts. That means they will erupt into the hard palate if the baby fangs do not fall out promptly and are not extracted in time. This condition, if uncorrected by a Dental specialist, will cause a permanent hole in your pet’s hard palate creating a direct connection between the mouth and the nasal cavity. To correct this, the specialist will often construct an acrylic incline plane or “sliding ramp” to allow the inward directed lower fang to be forced out into a normal position. This is a very common occurrence in toy breeds but can occur in all animals.

In order to avoid these common oral-dental problems in young animals, pet owners must be very alert. Avoid dangerous hard chew toys and games that can break teeth! Check your pet’s mouth daily for signs of injury and teeth that are not coming in properly. Animals enjoy having their mouths stroked and played with, thus examining them is very easy.
 

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paris's teeth are not placed correctly....they are pointed backwards (fangs)
so she's now 5 months but still not exchanging ....next week i have to go to the vet to have her checked again....because we have to keep a close eye on her teeth. maybe we have to pull her teeth so her adult ones can grow correctly and if not we have to puss her teeth every day for a bit to get them in place :shock:

kisses nat
 

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I went to the vet last night, he said we will wait til Sally Lolita is 6 months old. If she hasn't dropped the baby teeth then, they will have to perform surgery. He said he rather wait and do the spaying and pulling the teeth all at once, so she doesn't have to go under anesthesia twice. I am still not sure about spaying her though, but I guess I only have a month to think about it now. Anyway, I hope Paris is fine and her teeth come out properly. she's such a cutie. hugs
 

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Hi there, your vet is right! If the teeth need to come out, they will need anesthesia, and you might as well do the spay at that time as well, to reduce the amount of taxing her liver can take during a young age. Leaving deciduous teeth can cause over crowding, which isn't so much a problem in terms of malloclusion and causing improper wear, as it is with jaw structure, and possible nerve damage in the future. Retained decidous teeth are really common in small breed dogs, and we pull them all the time, but it is difficult to re-correct any malloclusion that has already occured. If you want, they DO have "doggy braces"...but other than aesthetic reasons, there isn't really a point =). Malloclusion of just adult teeth is fine in more cases, on the other hand in rabbits and rodents, malloclusion is a BIG deal.

If there is anything we can do to help your decision to spay her, trust me, there are plenty of knowledgable people here who can sway your decision =)

-Nate
 

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Thanks Nate, that post is very helpful. About the spaying, I think i am gonna start a new post so I can get the advice I need to make a decision.
 

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Hey Nate that's exactly what my vet told me. She actually waits until the smaller dogs are 7 months old to spay or neuter so that all of their adult teeth have a chance to come in and they pull the baby teeth at the same time. :D
 
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