Chihuahua People Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,058 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yesterday, Zola started to do this crazy thing. Its hard to explain but it was like he couldnt breath. Almost like an asthma attack. I panicked didnt know what to do. Took him to my neighbour who managed to calm me down and she looked down his throat. By the time she put him down on the floor in her house he was fine and bouncing about playing again. Thank god. I really have never been so scared. He was out in the garden a little while before this happened so maybe he swallowed a bit of grass or something and just needed to try and get it up. Anyway just thought id share my scary story. Thanks god he's ok.

My mum told me on the phone, if anytning every happens to that dog Vicky I hate to think how heart broken you will be. It's soooo true. I couldnt love him more
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,852 Posts
Vicky , sorry to hear you had a bad moment with your lad :(

Once a cat of ours did the same thing and she did have grass
stuck in the back of her throat :shock:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,393 Posts
It sounds like the chihuahua choke/inverted breathing that most do, usually calming them down will sort them out okay. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,852 Posts
paint my world said:
My mum told me on the phone, if anytning every happens to that dog Vicky I hate to think how heart broken you will be. It's soooo true. I couldnt love him more
My mum says the same thing ( and so does my boyfriend ) they say it is their biggest worry !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,852 Posts
sullysmum said:
It sounds like the chihuahua choke/inverted breathing that most do, usually calming them down will sort them out okay. :)
Don't you just hate it when they do that , I always stop my boy and make him calm down when he does it , It always makes me worry ..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
the frog

Hiya, did your dog make a noise like a frog? This is quite common with chihuahua's and is caused by the trachia colapsing, then re-inflating. It usually lasts for only 20-30 seconds and is not serious, but if you are worried i would contact your vet, all my chihuahua's do the frog. If you just leave them to it its over before it starts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,058 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies. It makes me feel better knowing that this can happen. At first I thought he was taking some kind of fit. It is kinda like a frog your right. I think I did already tho to start with cuz I calmed him down but then I flipped out as it went on for a few mins. As soon as he went next door it stopped tho.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,015 Posts
Bella has something similiar happen occasionally....I find if I just talk calmly to her it stops......but it is scary !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,425 Posts
If you put your hand under their belly (on Cooper, it's between the rib cage area and his wee-wee) and lift them up a little by putting pressure on the tummy area, it helps getting them to stop the "coughing". When I do it to Cooper, his back legs almost lift off the floor. On the smaller guys and gals (Coop's 10 lbs), you might just need a finger or two, not the whole hand.

Cooper does the inverted sneeze thing and it absolutely freaked me out the first time it happened. Luckily, we are at the vet's office for his first round of shots and the vet just calmly walked over to him and applied pressure on his abdomen and he stopped.

He's my third Chi and the other two never did that. I thought he was afflicted! Come to find out, it's just ME that's afflicted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Paco does this every day when I come home from work. I just lay down on the floor with him and pet him and tell him to calm down and it usually stops in a minute or so. First time he did it though it scared me to death, even though I had read about it, believe me it didn't prepare me at all! I'm with the rest of you, if ANYTHING ever happened to Paco it would kill me! When he got attacked by that shepard back in March I cried all the way to the vets office and I just kept saying over and over "Paco please be okay little buddy". I absolutely dread the thought!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,716 Posts
reverse sneezing article

Have you ever been startled by your dog exhibiting snorting, honking and gasping noises? Have you felt helpless while you watched your canine friend appear to be struggling to breathe?

What you probably witnessed is the condition in dogs known as reverse sneezing. It actually has nothing to do with sneezing, but is a spasm caused by an irritation of the soft palate. The soft palate is a soft, fleshy tissue extension off the hard palate, or roof of the mouth. Small dogs in particular can exhibit this behavior and certain breeds may be predisposed to it. It has sent many a distraught owner to the vet in panic.

Some animals can have this condition for their entire lives, or it may develop as the dog ages. During the spasm, the dog will usually turn her elbows outward and extend her neck while gasping inwards with a distinctive snorting sound. Gently massaging the throat area or pinching the dog's nostrils shut so she must breath through her mouth can help shorten the episode. Sometimes taking the dog outside in the fresh air stops the spasm. Once the attack ceases, all goes back to normal.

(Another technique sometimes used to stop a bout of canine reverse sneezing: behavior specialist Sarah Wilson suggests trying to get the dog to swallow, touching the back of the tongue if that is safe.)

It is thought that the pharyngeal spasm can be caused by a number of irritants, including dust and pollen, or household chemicals. Moreover, some dogs can launch an episode after eating, drinking or running around, or while pulling on the leash.

If your dog experiences this behavior fairly frequently and the episodes are severe, a trip to the vet is in order to determine other possible causes, which can include viral infections, polyps, excessive soft palate tissue, and nasal mites. However, many cases of reverse sneezing appear to have no identifiable cause.

There lives a small Chihuahua Beagle mix, Cynthia Louise, who possesses a certain PAW volunteer. Cindy was extremely prone to severe middle-of-the-night reverse sneezing episodes when she first came into the PAW program, sending her terrified then-foster mom (now devoted adopter) to the vet in alarm. The vet anesthetized her (Cindy, not her mom) and explored the little dog's sinus cavities as best she could to see if anything was embedded in her sinus passages. Nothing was found, and after a short course of anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics, Cindy recovered completely.

In hindsight, it seems quite likely that the time of year, autumn, with its accompanying proliferation of allergens, combined with the stress of being in a new household, may have contributed to Cindy's pronounced reverse sneezing. Since the initial episodes subsided, the little dog has had only one or two minor incidences.

Reverse sneezing appears a lot worse than it is, generally posing no health threats whatsoever. Typically, an episode of reverse sneezing will end soon on its own. Nevertheless, understanding and recognizing the syndrome can go a long way toward helping dog owners and their dogs cope with it.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top