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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 13 month old chi x that we adopted from her previous owners at 9 months of age.

Holly is a quiet & loving dog but has a few odd traits. She is in good health & is now at a healthy weight (why do people think small dogs should be fat? :confused: )

She has a habit of peeing nervously whenever you reprimand her, try to teach her something or even pay her special attention.

She seems to be a very nervous dog who also has a huge desire for attention. If I call one of the other dogs she will immediately jump up & get right in my face almost blocking the others from having any contact.

For example anytime I try to teach her to sit (we expect the dogs to do this before being fed) she gets nervous & pees herself, she also did this when I tried to put her up on the armchair tonight to take a new photo of her.

All in all she is a lovely dog, very tolerant of my 3 young children & gets along well with all our other pets, in fact she gets on with the cats better than our 18 month old chi x who has been with them since she was a pup. From what I understand her previous owners worked all day & left her locked in the back yard & I have a feeling she slept there too because she was not toilet trained. She has now come into a home where she is either inside with us or in a yard with 3 other dogs where she can see all the goings on of the street & she gets to sleep in comfort in our bed.

Has anyone got any ideas on how to curb the nervous wee & to help her get past this anxiety?

P.S. Sorry for the ramble!
 

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Have you tried DAP spray or you can get collars ,or plug in (Amazon) that help nervous dogs ,calms them down .
 

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My moms wiener dog did this every time she go excited or if you went to pick her upor even got to close sometimes. She did it her whole long life. We tried to just ignore her until she was completely calm, sometimes it helped sometimes it didn't. No baby talking to her either, that was hard! Have you had her checked by the vet?
 

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Google "submissive urination" and you will find a ton of links and help on how to help her. Sorry, dont' have time to look up links, but wanted to pass on the information!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies everybody.

Holly has been given a clean bill of health by the vet, but at the time we thought the peeing was due to her being in a new environment & didn't really ask about it. She is due for her booster vacs in a couple of weeks so I think I will ask them about it then.

Have not heard of DAP before so I will have a look into it, Thanks.

WIll also google submissive urination, can't believe I didn't think of that myself!

Thanks for the help.
 

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My toy fox did this forever. Mostly with my husband because he'd excite her when he got home, or right when I went to hook her up to go outside (we have no fence). What I started doing was making her sit then lean down to put on her leash. If she started to squat or piddle I stood up and put my back to her. It took a really long time, but now when she is at the door at least she either sits or puts here rear in the air so I know she isn't peeing. Also when other people went to pet her I asked them to do the same, to curb the excited peeing. Hope that helps some :)
 

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Bailey was a submissive urinater starting when we brought him home at 8 weeks. Thank goodness he eventually grew out of it for the most part. He will be 2 next week and he still has the occasional excited pee.
 

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also, since i can't hear you obviously ;), some of it may be your voice. not that your doing anything wrong, but my aussie, if my mom tells her to do something with her regular voice kira will sometimes piddle -_- We laugh about it now, since i'm no longer living with her, but when my mom comes to visit she has to raise her voice an octave to stave off the piddling for the first little while of being there lol. some dogs are super sensitive, and something about my moms voice just makes her piddle, till she gets used to it again. Kira LOVES my mom, she was my mom's "therapy" puppy during a bad divorce, and we ended up keeping her, 12 years later :D here she is. but maybe try raising your voice a bit higher? its a long shot, and for all i know you have a high voice, but ehh just a thought .lol
 
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