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This is not directly related to Chihuahuas but when I read this article, I had NO idea this was going on. From the PETA media website:

Pound Seizure: The Shame of Shelters

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The pounds and shelters of the United States were established to take in homeless animals for both humane and public-health reasons. Some animals are taken to shelters by guardians who can no longer keep them. Others are strays taken in by concerned individuals, police officers, or animal-control officers. While shelters sometimes take in other types of animals, most of their charges are dogs, cats, puppies, and kittens, and almost all are former companion animals or their offspring.

What Is Pound Seizure?
If a shelter or pound is located in a state or county with a “pound-seizure law,” it means that animals who are not claimed by former or new guardians within a certain number of days (typically five) are required by law to be turned over on demand for experimentation.

The ultimate fate of these confiscated animals is death. But before they die, they may suffer greatly at the hands of vivisectors like those at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio, where a PETA undercover investigator witnessed hideously painful scabies experiments on dogs seized from the local pound. In the experiments, dogs were infected with scabies, a skin disease caused by microscopic mites that spread over the entire body, causing intense prolonged itching, open wounds, and, eventually, death. One dog named Genesee was infected so severely that she turned in constant circles, unable to rest because of the intense itching. She cried out when handled, wouldn’t eat or drink, and lost her balance. Her anguished howls could be heard through closed doors until she finally died—without veterinary treatment because that would have “interfered” with the experiment.

Pound seizure is illegal in Denmark, England, the Netherlands, and Sweden. In the United States, there is no federal law regarding pound seizure, but 13 states forbid it: Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and West Virginia. Most other states have no law on the matter and leave it up to county or town governments, but three states—Minnesota, Oklahoma, and Utah—require pound seizure at government-run facilities. Several bills opposing pound seizure have been put before Congress, but none has been enacted. Please visit www.banpoundseizure.org/home.shtml for more information.

Pound Seizure Problems
Animal-protection organizations object strongly to pound seizure … and for good reason. Animals who were once well-loved companions suffer the double blow of losing their human friends and being confined to a laboratory cage. Families experience the anguish of knowing that a lost animal or one they have given up may have been killed in a painful experiment. In communities that allow or enforce pound seizure, people often choose to abandon animals they cannot keep on the street or in a field rather than send them to a laboratory via the local shelter, thus adding to the problem of homeless strays. To make money, some disreputable shelters have been known to quickly sell their healthiest and most adoptable wards to a laboratory rather than finding them new homes.

Random Sources, Random Results
Although many experimenters praise pound seizure because it provides cheap and easy access to an unlimited supply of vivisection victims, some scientists feel that such “random source” animals, of mixed breeds and unknown histories, yield misleading results in experiments. And because pound seizure provides an inexpensive and easy source of animals, it allows experimenters to continue using animals rather than switching to humane alternatives. Initially, purpose-bred animals cost more, but animals from random or unknown sources must go through an expensive period of “conditioning” before becoming part of an experiment. These animals also have a higher mortality rate in laboratories than purpose-bred animals—perhaps because the latter have not been sensitized to human love and then betrayed.

What You Can Do
If you live in a state that mandates pound seizure, learn as much as possible about the subject. Talk to the managers of local shelters and pounds to see what they have done or are doing. Find out whether any town or state officials are interested in the issue and whether any are working to repeal pound-seizure laws, either locally or nationally. Start a petition, find occasions to talk about or debate the issue in private and in public, and organize a letter-writing campaign. Try to arrange a public viewing of PETA’s video of a medical-school dog lab or write to PETA for a vivisection action pack.

If you live in a state that leaves the decision up to local authorities, you can work to ban pound seizure in your community or campaign for a state law.

If you live in a state that already forbids pound seizure, you can guard against efforts to change that law and work for federal legislation against pound seizure. Because of interstate animal trafficking, companion animals in every state will be at risk until there is a federal law against pound seizure.
 

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The info is upsetting, but consider the source.

PETA has or had an 'animal adoption centre' which they purportedly used to care for unwanted animals and adopt them out. Well, only two animals were ever adopted out, the rest were all euthanised.

PETA doesn't believe dogs should be pets. They'd prefer to allow them to disappear, because keeping them is inhumane. So they say.

check out www.petakillsanimals.com
 

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thats absolutely horrible!!!! how could you live with yourself after knowing you were one of the scientists responsible for an Innocent animals death?!? :angry5: :angryfire:
 

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If that is true about pounds it is absolutely inhuman and despicable :cry: :twisted: As much as I adora animals I do take things from PETA with a agrain of salt as they are very radical
 

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On another forum I participate on. a member who was in vet school and were doing lab test/experiemts on animals who were obtained from the animal shelters told the story of a vet student in the same class who had lost his dog and was looking for it but wasn't able to find it. it turn out that days later he found his dog a the school lab where the class were doing experiemtns on dogs, just waiting to be worked on. Obiously, he immediately took his dog home.
that is so scarry!!!!

Weather is PETa or not who is providing this information about the shelter dogs. it is true that some cities sell the homeless dogs for experiment.
 

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Cooper said:
This is not directly related to Chihuahuas but when I read this article, I had NO idea this was going on. From the PETA media website:

Random Sources, Random Results
Although many experimenters praise pound seizure because it provides cheap and easy access to an unlimited supply of vivisection victims, some scientists feel that such “random source” animals, of mixed breeds and unknown histories, yield misleading results in experiments. And because pound seizure provides an inexpensive and easy source of animals, it allows experimenters to continue using animals rather than switching to humane alternatives. Initially, purpose-bred animals cost more, but animals from random or unknown sources must go through an expensive period of “conditioning” before becoming part of an experiment. These animals also have a higher mortality rate in laboratories than purpose-bred animals—perhaps because the latter have not been sensitized to human love and then betrayed.
As someone who's current education involves the use of "purpose-bred" animals for surgery instruction, let me tell you just how much more disturbing it is. While millions of dogs and cats DIE each year without a chance, dozens of veterinary institutions around the country PURCHASE PURPOSE BRED DOGS that are used for education, then terminated. It doesn't make sense does it? Shouldn't we try and stop the problem of breeding, and not support an industry that BREEDS dogs for research? Given the current laws and the necessity to our surgical education, there is no other alternative - the school's hands are tied because of so many legal protests to using pound seizures - PETA is at the forefront of this.

Let me tell you how our educational-use animals are treated. From day they arrive, they are named, and they are provided a group of students as their caretakers. The students are responsible for ALL their care, they walk, feed, play with, bathe, enrich, and love this dog. The dog recieves some of the best care and attention that can be had, and spends months enjoying life. When procedures are done on this animal, the students take the greatest care to make sure no suffering is experienced, and they have a sincere respect for the life and welfare of the animal. When surgeries are done that would be painful if they are recovered - these animals are given a humane ending, and believe me, the students cry. If the animals are used in non-painful procedures and recovered, most are adopted to the students (future veterinarians) themselves. If the professors think the animal isn't cared for properly or in pain - the student fails.

Now let me tell you how pound seizure animals are euthanized. In the worst case (which is illegal, but it does happen) they are killed in groups via CO2 gas (i.e. suffocated). In the best case, they are given IV or IP euthanasia solution by pound workers (not veterinarians). They have had neither an enriched life, nor have they really had a humane ending. The ratio of animals adopted from humane societies to how many are actually there and euthanized is incredibally low. If all 32 US vet schools were able to bring pound animals into the schools, that would be roughly 4,000 dogs per year that could experience a good life, with a guaranteed happy or humane ending.

If these animals are going being euthanized, why not allow them to have an experience of great care and attention with us. Why not let veterinary students benefit from them as a lesson in ethics, respect, and medicine. Why allow them to die without ever having a purpose? Why not give them a chance to live a great life for a while, and the possibility of being adopted by a vet student? None of the schools or students believe that breeding dogs for education or research is the right answer, in fact all of us hate it. Laws such as these give us no other choice.

Worried that the dog you're using is someone's pet? Nowadays, especially with Animal Welfare Act in place, animals impounded go through a "waiting period" - usually 15 days before they are placed for adoption. If they can't be adopted, they are kept as long as possible, then euthanized. If an owner of a pet hasn't been able to find a pet who is housed at a local shelter for over 2 weeks, they obviously didn't care to look very hard (even though they will probably tell their lawyers different when trying to sue somebody for $$). They didn't bother to place ID on the animal either or microchip them, otherwise they wouldn't have had the problem. The internet makes finding the pet even easier. If either of my dogs were lost, I'd be consistently checking local shelters every day to see if they were found.

That's my perspective, and you might not agree, but I've developed my opinion by having to experience these ethical dilemmas on a daily basis. It is not easy, and sometimes you have to pick the lesser of the 2 evils because the "ideal" choice is usually never an option.

-N
 

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kenya said:
On another forum I participate on. a member who was in vet school and were doing lab test/experiemts on animals who were obtained from the animal shelters told the story of a vet student in the same class who had lost his dog and was looking for it but wasn't able to find it. it turn out that days later he found his dog a the school lab where the class were doing experiemtns on dogs, just waiting to be worked on. Obiously, he immediately took his dog home.
that is so scarry!!!!

Weather is PETa or not who is providing this information about the shelter dogs. it is true that some cities sell the homeless dogs for experiment.
If this story is true, here is what disturbs me about your story Kenya. Animal shelters will not release dogs or cats until a "waiting period", and if they are go to research or education, they are literally on "death row". This is mandated by law, and if a shelter, or institution is caught violating this law, they face huge repercussions and legal actions. The fact that the OTHER vet student who LOST their dog didn't look at the shelter, or was unable to find their dog is even MORE disturbing - it means that for a few weeks, they neglected to check the local shelter for the dog they supposedly loved so much. Furthermore, they didn't bother to put ID on the dog or microchip them? If this is all true, that's gross negligence, as vet students pretty much get anything vet related for free. If you want to blame someone for this misfortune, I'd blame the student more than anything. Humans are the primary reason why so many dogs are in shelters anywas. Overbreeding, lack of responsibility, ignorance in ownership, and laziness account for the majority of animals in shelters.
 

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natelam said:
kenya said:
On another forum I participate on. a member who was in vet school and were doing lab test/experiemts on animals who were obtained from the animal shelters told the story of a vet student in the same class who had lost his dog and was looking for it but wasn't able to find it. it turn out that days later he found his dog a the school lab where the class were doing experiemtns on dogs, just waiting to be worked on. Obiously, he immediately took his dog home.
that is so scarry!!!!

Weather is PETa or not who is providing this information about the shelter dogs. it is true that some cities sell the homeless dogs for experiment.
If this story is true, here is what disturbs me about your story Kenya. Animal shelters will not release dogs or cats until a "waiting period", and if they are go to research or education, they are literally on "death row". This is mandated by law, and if a shelter, or institution is caught violating this law, they face huge repercussions and legal actions. The fact that the OTHER vet student who LOST their dog didn't look at the shelter, or was unable to find their dog is even MORE disturbing - it means that for a few weeks, they neglected to check the local shelter for the dog they supposedly loved so much. Furthermore, they didn't bother to put ID on the dog or microchip them? If this is all true, that's gross negligence, as vet students pretty much get anything vet related for free. If you want to blame someone for this misfortune, I'd blame the student more than anything. Humans are the primary reason why so many dogs are in shelters anywas. Overbreeding, lack of responsibility, ignorance in ownership, and laziness account for the majority of animals in shelters.

Natalam,

For the record Im looking to blame anyone here. All I said is that dogs from animal shelters end up at vet schools, relating to the "pound seizure" article posted earlier.

Here is the actual story told by the member at the other forum I belong to:

"Today was a sad day at vet school. it was surgery day for me. i dont know if all of you know, but these dogs dont get to wake up... so we have to go out there and pick which one we want. one of my classmates went early to pick her dog to go weigh it so she could figure out the anesthesia medications before we had to start our procedures. there was a 4th year student (im 3rd) who was in clinics on his surgery rotation, and he saw the dog and said "hey thats my dog!" my classmate thought he was joking, and he said "no serious, my dog ran away three weeks ago!" it is amazing how lucky he and that dog are. just an hour away from being operated on then put to sleep. the miracle that he happened to be on that rotation, and that my classmate went in to weight it early. i still cant believe this happened! i was almost in tears after we picked out our dog b/c she was so young and cute, but after hearing that i almost started balling....so at least one dog had a happy ending today."


THe story doesn't say how much this person who lost the dog look for him, weather he put flyers and called the animal shelter constantly I don't know.
I wanna think he did since he is a vet.

I agree when you say"Overbreeding, lack of responsibility, ignorance in ownership, and laziness account for the majority of animals in shelters"
 
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