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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
EDIT: I copied the article a couple posts down...the link isnt working for some reason


:x :evil: :x :evil: :x :evil:

typical puppy mill and it was happening not 20 minutes from my home. I am planning on visiting the shelter and seeing if I can volunteer.

Anyone in IL looking to adopt a chi...here is your chance.

I cannot even read the article again...it makes me so mad. The son of this household threatened to set himself on fire if the police took the dogs...the mom hid herself in a room with her dogs. It makes me physically ill!!!!!!!

All in all 72 chi's and one papillon.

*sigh*
 

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My gosh...72 chi's :shock: . Shame on him and his mom. But on a lighter note I think that's very sweet of you to volunteer.

I'm also glad to hear that a lot of chi lovers had already called in, I hope they all find homes.
 

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it won't let me see the article.. it says i have to register.. could you copy and paste it.. or PM it to me? thanks..i would register but i have to provide my adress and my mom doesn't allow me to give my adress online. :?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
whoops sorry...here is the story

`There were piles and piles of dogs'
Constant yapping hounded neighbors-- then police found 71 Chihuahuas in a raid on a Wheeling home

By Kayce T. Ataiyero, Tribune staff reporter. Tribune staff reporters Michael Higgins, Richard Wronski and Scott Goldstein and freelance writer Mark Shuman contributed to this report
Published August 19, 2005


Some of the dogs--very small dogs--peered over the tops of boxes scattered about the bedroom of the Wheeling town home. Others were clustered behind the toilet, about 35 pairs of scared little eyes peeking from behind the porcelain.

In all, 72 dogs--71 Chihuahuas and a lone papillon--were rescued Wednesday evening from the home that animal shelter officials described Thursday as an illegal puppy mill.

"There were piles and piles of dogs," said Laura Krauch, manager of the Heartland Animal Shelter in Northbrook. "I looked behind the toilet and almost died."

Wheeling police raided the two-story town home in the 800 block of Chelsea Drive around 6 p.m. Wednesday, making their way up a rotting wooden staircase and knocking down a bedroom door on the second floor to confront a woman who had locked herself in with some of the dogs, authorities said.

All of the animals were in good health, and officials offered a silver lining to a story that began when neighbors complained about the smell and constant barking.

Most of the dogs, which range from newborn pups to 8 years old, probably will be adopted, and calls from Chihuahua lovers were already pouring in to the shelter.

When asked how popular the pint-size dogs are, Krauch said, "People love Chihuahuas. You can take them to bingo and put them on the table for good luck. I've seen . . . that."

No charges were filed Thursday against the occupants of the home, where a condemnation notice with bright red lettering was posted on the front door, officials said. It was a family of three people, a woman and her two adult children, said Cmdr. Jim Kuzynowski of the Wheeling Police Department, who declined to release their names.

Village ordinance restricts residents to four dogs per household, and all dogs must be licensed. A charge of cruelty to animals could be filed, Kuzynowski said.

One of the family members was previously cited for having too many dogs and pleaded guilty, he said.

Shelter workers said the dogs were for sale, apparently the sole source of income for the family.

An animal welfare officer from the state Department of Agriculture said the residents had no license to breed and sell animals or to kennel them, according to department representative Chris Herbert.

During the tense confrontation, police had to break down the bedroom door when the woman refused to come out and release the dogs, authorities said. A man believed to be her son doused himself with lighter fluid and had to be restrained by police, officials said.

"He says if you take my dogs, I'm going to kill myself," Krauch said.

The house appeared to be well-kept, at least on the outside, with "nice siding, nice paint," said Hannah Arbizzani, the shelter's executive director.

But when the workers went inside, a suffocating stench of urine wafted over them and they had to don face masks, Arbizzani said.

Dogs were everywhere in the two-bedroom home. "They had the run of the place," she said.

Dragging out dog crates, the workers discovered that one of the animals had just given birth to some pups.

Another dog, a 10-week-old pup a rescue worker nicknamed Binky, cowered in the corner, not wanting to socialize with the others.

The tight clusters of Chihuahuas were sprayed with carbon dioxide to help separate them. They were scooped into cat carriers, counted and taken to the shelter

Police said 70 dogs were rescued, but shelter officials put the number at 72 after counting and recounting the squirming pups.

Arbizzani said she believed the residents were raising the dogs for sale, probably getting customers over the Internet or through advertisements, for $300 a dog.

"They were breeders," she said. "They weren't hoarding."

Maurice Lazama, 37, a neighbor, said his wife called police, the Wheeling Health Department and the homeowners association several times over the last few months to complain about the noise and smell coming from the home. But when authorities went to the door, no one would answer, he said.

During the standoff Wednesday, police evacuated the adjoining townhouses after the man stood by an upstairs window with lighter fluid, he said.

When Lazama returned to his home, the dogs were lined up in cardboard boxes and crates outside the townhouse, he said. Some boxes had three to five dogs, including some puppies.

The people who lived in the town home "were just reclusive," another neighbor said. "We see them walking in with cases and cases of dog food."

Al Carver, who runs a Chihuahua rescue service in Palos Heights, said he thought the dogs would be adopted quickly.

At any given time, he has a waiting list of 30 to 40 people who want to give one of the small dogs a good home, he said.

"It is a loving dog," Carver said of the Mexican breed. "I have three of them myself."

Thursday afternoon, the dogs were being fed at the Heartland shelter, where they were getting a little chill time to adjust to their new surroundings and recover from the trauma.

Aside from a minor skin condition, the dogs are in general good health, said Lauren Olsberg, manager of Preiser Animal Hospital next to the shelter. All of them will need shots and nail trims, she said.

"Just basic care," Olsberg said. "They are very sweet."

Despite the number of dogs, Olsberg said the shelter is optimistic that homes could be found.

"Small dogs go very fast," she said.

Not fast enough, perhaps.

Wednesday night, a new litter of three pups was born.

The Heartland Animal Shelter can be reached at 847-296-6400.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
WOW, I just called the shelter so I could leave a message with my info and what I could do to help and they have no room on their voice mail for messages....i guess a lot of people are calling in which is good! I hope I can get a hold of them tomorrow!
 

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I feel so sorry for all those puppies. 72 of them...that's just...wow. I'm glad that they're in the custody of the animal control people. I do hope that they'll all get good and loving homes, which I'm sure they will. Let's hope that new litter will be okay through all this stress.

Good for you for posting the story and trying to help out. The world needs more of ya. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
:x Can you believe they didnt charge them with animal cruelty. I dont care how good of condition they were in they were never allowed outside....its cruelty enough not to let them breath fresh air, to run in the grass, to have room to relax without being in their own waste. It just inrages me that they got away from this with no punishment. :x
 

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WOW, are you serious?! It shouldn't matter whether you're living in a small apartment, a two-story house, or a big ranch--72 dogs with three people (that we know of) looking after them? That's too many dogs entirely, and you know that with that many pups, those people couldn't really take time to give one what it needed over any of the others. What if some of them were sick or needed something else? That's so awful. Like you said, making them stay in their own waste is bad enough. They need to be charged with something. The article even referred to it as an "illegal puppy mill"...correct me if I'm wrong, but if things are illegal, aren't the responsible parties deserving of some type of punishment? They were making profit from these guys...$300 each? They should have to forfeit some of that. Just my two cents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
No charges were filed Thursday against the occupants of the home, where a condemnation notice with bright red lettering was posted on the front door, officials said. It was a family of three people, a woman and her two adult children, said Cmdr. Jim Kuzynowski of the Wheeling Police Department, who declined to release their names.
This is out of the article. I totally agree with you, not only should they pay a huge fine, but should do community service at a animal shelter. I think they should go to prision but some might see that as a little too harsh....but the way I look at it a life is a life, you neglected these poor living creatures and kept them from having a normal life...you need to be punished :evil:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
lol i agree...if I had it my way I would force them to live in tight quarters with no tolit or running water...sure i will feed them but they will never see the light of day, feel the fresh breeze on their faces, and on yeah, i wont clean their living quarters.

I guarantee if we did that it would cut down on the number of people who run these puppymills.
 

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Yeah, possibly. My fiance got his little Mini Dachshund from the local pet store (I begged him not to, but when he saw him, his heart melted). He decided after the fact that he was glad he'd gotten him from there, as he thought of it as kind of rescuing him. Anyway, the owners told us the lil guy would be CKC registered and would call us as soon as they got his papers in. For a while, we worried that he'd come from a puppy mill, but my ever so honest fiance asked the pet store owners a few weeks ago where his pup came from. They told him it was an elderly man a few counties over that was retired and bred Dachsies in his spare time. He addressed his concerns to them about him coming from a puppy mill and get this, they told him, "Oh no, he didn't come from a puppy mill. We get dogs from puppy mills sometimes, but just prefer not to. I mean, they ship them to us here and they just come how they come and you've got to take them that way." :shock: Yeah. And the sweet, retired, elderly gentleman who bred the Dachsies in his spare time also seems to find time to constantly breed three other breeds....yeah, so I'm sure you know exactly what I was thinking.
 

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That is just awful!! I'm going to talk to my bf tonight when he gets home and see about calling to adopt one of the pups. How are they not charging them with cruelty and how exactly did these people keep them in good health??? There were 72 of them for crying out loud! They should be locked up for the rest of their lives!!
 

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pinkprincess21 said:
That is just awful!! I'm going to talk to my bf tonight when he gets home and see about calling to adopt one of the pups. How are they not charging them with cruelty and how exactly did these people keep them in good health??? There were 72 of them for crying out loud! They should be locked up for the rest of their lives!!
Agreed. :angry7:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Looks like charges have been filed against the family!!!

Small shelter swims in Chihuahuas — and attention
By Dave Orrick
Daily Herald Staff Writer
Posted Saturday, August 20, 2005

If it were a normal business, Heartland Animal Shelter’s inventory would have jumped 350 percent overnight.

And it showed Friday, as extra staffers and temps off the street struggled to catalog and process the new product while purchasers formed long lines. The voice-mail system was shot and the staff were approaching frantic.

But Heartland is not a company built on sales, and the focus of its sudden surge of business was no mere “product.”

It was a heart-rending swarm of 69 — then 71 after a recount, then three births — make that 74 Chihuahua dogs and counting. They, and one papillon, were rescued a night earlier from a Wheeling home that police described as an illegal puppy mill.

“It might be time to cut it off, shut the doors. We can’t handle any more,” one shelter worker suggested Friday afternoon during a group huddle. A superior barked, “No way. We need the traffic.” And then, lowering her voice a notch: “We need all the money we can get.”


Bill Zars/Daily Herald They may not realize it, but these and all the other 70-some Chihuahuas rescued from a Wheeling home already have better homes lined up, thanks to the rush of hundreds of potential adopters at the Heartland Animal Shelter in Northbrook, where the dogs are being housed.


With a kitchen for an office and finances well into the red, the inventory influx was stretching the 3-year-old Northbrook shelter to its limit.

Meanwhile, police Friday cited two residents of the Wheeling home at 812 Chelsea Drive with five local animal-protection violations each, and town officials kicked the family out, declaring the building uninhabitable. Randy Grant, 30, and Jeanie Grant, 40, could be fined as much as $2,500 each for the violations, which include cruelty to animals, police said.

Many of the popular puny dogs were malnourished, although animal welfare officials said they expect all to pull through.

Police suspect the Grants were running a “puppy farm” and selling the dogs cheap over the Internet. Puppy farms, characterized by a bare-bones operation with little regard for anything but the pets’ ability to breed fast, draw the ire of animal welfare advocates.

At the shelter Friday afternoon, the growing pooch population was surpassed only by the steady stream of Chihuahua aficionados hoping to adopt one. Executive Director Hannah Arbizzani said “hundreds” had come.

No one took any home though, because the dogs were technically still evidence of the Wheeling police department.

Tori Sam said she could wait. The 7-year-old’s parents, Victor and Nancy, made the pilgrimage from the LaGrange area with Tori and her brother, 8-year-old Timmy. Tori said she was looking forward to getting a Chihuahua as a companion for Bebe, a Chihuahua mix her family already owns.

“I put her on my bike and ride with her,” Tori said. “I want them both to ride.”

Seated around a small table, Arbizzani went over the usual questions with the family: “Have you owned a dog before? … What other pets do you have?” Then she laid out the bottom line.

“The ($150) adoption fee only covers our costs,” she said. “We survive on donations. Anything else you can give, we really, really welcome.”

It’s not an opportunistic sales pitch; the shelter really needs the money, she insisted.

The nonprofit reported just over $68,000 in revenue and $202,719 in expenses in last year’s tax filings, records show.

So while Arbizzani said she was “disheartened and angry” at the conditions she witnessed when she helped police rescue the dogs, she also said she hopes the publicity will bring in money — especially now.

The shelter fronts all costs for vaccinations, as well as spaying and neutering all the dogs, none of which had been fixed. The process was just beginning Friday afternoon. And they’ll have to house the dogs for at least a week. The shelter normally houses 20 to 25 dogs.

“As much as it’s been a nightmare, it’s also a blessing,” she said as she sighed while struggling with a stubborn copy machine. “We’ve seen more people looking to adopt pets, and more volunteers, than we’ve ever seen.”

She needed to copy a liability waiver for Tricha Boyles of Palatine. Off work for a spell, Boyles heard about the dogfest and showed up unannounced Friday morning to see if the shelter needed any help.

“They were like, ‘Yeah, just go in the back and keep cleaning up after all those dogs!’’ she said. “I was like, sure!”
It also says that most have homes lined up. Glad to hear the happy ending and that none of them were euthanized! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
LOL you and me both. I still am trying to get a hold of someone there to see if I can stop in to volunteer tomorrow and on my days off. I have always wanted to go to that shelther anyway to volunteer.
 
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