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Discussion Starter #1
I think the reason many vets do blood testing before neutering (to test for how they would do under anesthesia I believe is main reason) is logical and I understand it.

My question is does anyone know why some vets do the blood tests; some do not - how important is it?

Thanks much. Peggy
 

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Im not sure Peg - neither of my 2 had blood tests before they were neutered - this option was not mentioned to us at all - maybe its different in the UK I dont know though - i think this is a question for our resident expert Nate :D
 

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I am no expert, but I think it is important that the pre-op blood work is done just to be sure everything is OK. I know when both my dogs go under for anything they always do pre-op blood work with my approval. :wave:

Leslie
 

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luvmydogs said:
I am no expert, but I think it is important that the pre-op blood work is done just to be sure everything is OK. I know when both my dogs go under for anything they always do pre-op blood work with my approval. :wave:

Leslie
I agree with that. Lily has always had blood work before any surgical procedure. It seemed like it was very routine with our vet. How else could they be sure the animal could tolerate the anesthesia?
 

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KB mamma said:
oliversmom said:
no need to bump as it will be seen. Fridays tend to be slow on the forum 8)
Yikes - sorry :(

I really was doing that somewhat as a test anyway - because I am not in this forum often and was trying to get an answer / advice somewhat quickly.
 

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The blood work is really not necessary if the dog is young and in good health. But if they are 7 and above or in poor health like diabetes or thyroid etc... I would! it is mandatory at most vets here if they are senior. But it wont hurt to do them if you are nervous about not doing them :wink:
 

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Well, bloodwork is only "necessary" for the dogs who may have issues with anesthesia, but this is why we do it! It's necessary to do it to rule out these cases and help the doctor make the best decision about what kind of sedation is used, know ahead of time if there is anything unexpected, or if the dog is safe to go under at all.

What they look for on the bloodwork are liver enzymes, elevate enzymes can mean something as small as stress, to liver disease or shunt. If the liver is damaged, the dog cannot break down the anesthetic agents normally and may not wake up, or may have toxic reaction. If there is liver damage, they either won't do the procedure, or use a reversible or fast-acting agent.

They also look for packed cell volume and total protein in the blood to see how well hydrated the dog is and if they are anemic. This also helps them make a decision about fluid rates, etc...

They also look at the kidney values to see if there is kidney damage. If so, usually they will bolus the fluids at the beginning before starting surgery to make sure the blood pressure doesn't drop since the kidneys are not retaining fluids properly.

There are a few other small things they look at, glucose level, potassium, etc...that they can add to fluids if necessary to maintain normals while under surgery.

No animal goes under anesthesia without having done bloodwork in the last 3 months. Older dogs must have it done within the last 24 hours. On occasion when it's not possible (vicious dog, feral cat), animals are sedated and then the blood is taken and any precautions needed will be taken care of while the animal is under.

Is it safe not to have it done? It totally depends on your animal. A good example is the mobile feral cat spay/neuter clinic. They basically just knock down cat after cat with no cather or fluids or bloodwork. Most of these cats come out great since they appear healthy, but occasionally there is one that unexpectedly dies during surgery or does not wake up. Pre-anesthetic bloodwork and having IV access would prevent this situation in most cases.

In order to have the BEST possible scenario for surgery, pre-anesthetic bloodwork, catheter, and IV fluids is the only way to be the safest. There are plenty of surgeries that people do without these, but the only reason not to do these things is the cost. But, why take the risk?

-Nate
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks to EVERYONE for their replies. This was very helpful. To me it makes sense - I was trying to help a friend make her decision and wanted to be more informed than just say - I think it's the right thing to do.
 
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