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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
our little jake was due for his 2nd check up today. he is 9 weeks old today and weighs about 2.5 lbs...he's a porker. he passed a few worms last night for the first time after having 2 doses of dewormer. so we got another dose of dewormer at the vet. we also noticed that he was itching a lot so the vet did a scabies check which came up negative, but he said they are only 1/2 conclusive because the scabies burrough so far in the skin, so he gave him a shot for those aswell. he also got a half dose for his puppy booster. sooo now tonight i noticed that he smells kinda funny. like chemical?? its not strong, but i was wondering if it was from the shot? he lives in an apartment so there is nothing to get into and he sleeps in a crib, so we are ok there.

has anyone had experiences with worms?
or scabies? how long they take to go away?
or smells like this?

i have done a search, but dont find anything like this....im just wanting some imput.

thanks
 

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Blech... poor puppy!!

I have no experience with any of that but I do know after vaccinations, Cooper smells a bit funny to me. Sometimes, it's the alcohol swab or whatever they use to clean the area before giving injections - that could be it. Or it could be a chemical thing. I can't remember if OmaKitty smells or not since she hasn't had vacs in a few years. And too much time has passed for me to remember when Cooper was wormed.

I do know that at the shelter, it only takes a few treatments to get rid of worms when the puppies get them. In adult dogs, one dose usually does the trick. But those dogs are also exposed to a lot more than your little one is.

I'm sure someone else will have better information on worms and ... icks than I do. And I hope your pup gets to feeling better soon!!
 

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What made you think it was scabies?
Are there any bald spots?
Are there any sores? or iritated spots?

The smell could be a yeast infection in the skin. It smells different from a yeast infection in the ears, and would also cause itchyness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
we noticed that he had a couple patches for thinning hair. one was on his tail and one was on his left leg. he kept itching at them and was generally itchy all over.
our neighbor told us it might be mange and that her dog had it a few years ago. we were going to take him to the vet anyways, so we figured it would be best to have it taken care of for precaution.
he did have an irritated spot on his head. it looks like a little bump with a crust on it. the vet had taken note of it, but we found another on his belly on the way home.

he is doing fine and acts normal and is still very puppy like.

has anyone seen something like this?
 

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?

Did the vet do a scrape for Demodex mange? What did the vet say about the smell?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
he did do a scrape, but both my girlfriend and i didnt think that he was smelly before. it started afterwards.....we kinda think it has to do with the shots....?
 

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Shots should not cause them to smell funny.

I have a chi that is on her second round of Generalized Demodex. The first scraping the vet did did not show any mites. So I took her home with some antibiotics and watched her get worse. She did have a funky smell to her that ended up being a yeast infection in her skin. Normal antibiotics will NOT get rid of the yeast infection.
When I took her back to the vets, about a week later and after many calls to the vet, they did another scraping and found the Demodex mites.
She had lots of crusty areas all over her body and was very anxious all the time. Like she was always trying to hide from something.
She was on Ivermectin orally for a couple of months along with several courses of antibiotics and the yeast infection medicine. I had to bath her with 2 different shampoos, one for folecular flushing and one for itching.
Demodex is NOT contagious as a lot of people believe. Sarcoptic mange IS highly contagious. I have 2 longcoat females, and only 1 has Demodex.
I am hoping the reason her Demodex came back is because the vet told me to stop the Ivermectin too soon. Although some dogs have cronic Demodex all their lives.

Please keep an eye on your pup and if you see him getting any worse at all, get him back to the vet or take him to another one.
 

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i've had to do sooo many mange baths using mitaban once a week for 6-8 weeks on dogs when i worked at the vets. usually with demodex it isn't itchy unless a bacterial infection is present. i hvae an article saved i'll copy and paste it.........i would look into starting your baby on revolution it helps with intestinal parasites as well as external....

Demodex canis is the scientific name for the mite that causes “demodectic mange”. This follicular mite lives in the hair follicle where it occupies the space between the hair shaft and the lining of the hair follicle.

It is believed to feed on fluids present in the hair follicle. It causes inflammation in the hair follicle. This inflammation damages the hair follicle and the surrounding skin causing the hair to fall out.

As the infestation progresses, secondary bacterial infection occurs which results in formation of pus and drainage from the skin surface. It is believed that all puppies acquire a small number of mites during nursing and dogs normally have a small number of mites in their skin.

The immune system normally keeps the number of mites in check and most dogs never develop disease from the mite. However if the immune system is weakened by disease or medications that are immunosuppressive, the mites may multiply and cause disease.

It is believed that susceptibility to mange can also be inherited. This is the reason some veterinarians do not recommend breeding dogs that have ever gotten demodectic mange.

The most common finding in dogs with this type of mange is hair loss that starts on the face and/or legs. This type of mange does not cause itchiness unless a secondary bacterial infection occurs.

This type of mange is not considered to be contagious to other dogs and isolation from unaffected dogs is not believed to be necessary. This type of mange is not contagious to people.

Diagnosis is by multiple skin scrapings and examination of the material with a microscope. The only approved treatment is MitabanTM (amitraz) a dip that is applied to the skin. For some difficult cases 1% ivermectin, used to treat parasites in cattle and horses, has been used.

This drug is not approved for treatment of demodicosis in dogs and has significant possibly fatal side effects if used improperly. Advice from a veterinarian familiar with your dog is needed.

Sarcoptes scabei

Sarcoptes scabei causes the second most common type of mange in dogs, “sarcoptic mange” or “scabies”. The canine scabies mite is slightly different than the scabies mite that can be found in nursing homes. There are many important differences

between sarcoptic mange and demodectic mange. Sarcoptes mites do not normally inhabit the skin of dogs. They are acquired by contact with infested dogs or objects that have been in contact with infested dogs.

This mange can also be acquired by contact with infested foxes, raccoons or other wild mammals. Dogs can also get the mite by lying down in the same spot as an infested animal. The mite lives in the epidermis (the upper layer of the skin) not within hair follicles.

Sarcoptic mange always causes itchiness that can be quite severe, even if a secondary bacterial infection is not present. The more commonly affected areas are the head, ears, underside, elbows and feet.. Hair loss occurs because of scratching. The skin is usually inflamed. This mange is also contagious to humans although some people may not be as susceptible as others.

It is important that infested animals are isolated from non-infested animals. Positive diagnosis is by finding mites during microscopic examination of material collected from skin scrapings.

However this type of mite can be hard to find and often treatment is recommended based on physical exam alone. It can be easy to confuse the itchiness of sarcoptic mange with the itchiness of other skin disease such as allergy.

Treatments include amitraz, lime-sulfur dips, and 1% ivermectin. Your veterinarian will usually treat all dogs in contact with the infested dog at the same time.

Bedding should be discarded or washed in hot water. Using the same insecticidal products used for killing fleas in the environment can kill any mites present in the environment.

This type of mange can occur in any dog even if their immune system is functioning normally. There does not appear to be any inheritable susceptibility to this type of mange.

Prevention is by avoiding contact with infested dogs and avoiding contact with areas inhabited by infested wild animals.
 

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I've had 2 dogs that had Demodectic Mange (Demodex) as pups. One is our Labrador, Molly, and the other is my Chi, Tucker. Both of them itched, although neither of them had red skin or any sign of infection, just the usual hair loss. Both were treated with the Mitaban dips for 8 weeks. What a miserable time we all had with this. Molly had Demodex from January till March '04 and Tucker had it from May till June '04. Then Tucker had 3 knee surgeries that fall. Were we glad to see that year end!

I know that all will be well with your pup, but sometimes it can take a bit to get a fix on the diagnosis and get it treated properly. Hang in there! This, too, shall pass! :)
 

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I didnt read through all the posts here but the little thin spots of hair could be ring worm. One of my dogs picked it up awhile back. I didn't know what it was but it concerned me so I took him to the vet thinking it was some kind of mange and it was ringworm.
 
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