Chihuahua People Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Heyy!
So lately I've been considering getting a Chi. I'm just doing all the research I can first to make sure it's the right decision.:scratch:

Sooo, question: which do you think I should go with: rescuing a Chi or buying one from a breeder? :confused:

With rescuing, you are helping a Chi in need, and they cost much less. But you have no idea what their personality is going to develop into, or their health history, which could easily catch up with me in vet bills. :rolleyes:

With breeding, you can pay thousands - THOUSANDS - of dollars for a perfectly well bred Chi and you can meet the parents to see if you like the temperament. But it would be hard on my wallet to pay so much, when accidents still happen so vet visits are still expected.

With all of that in mind, I'm really on the fence here... just wanted to know if you have any experiences or advice to share!

Thanks!! :)

P.S. - it may sound like I have no idea what I'm doing, but I'm new to Chi's! :p Sorry haha
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
873 Posts
Well Daisy was from a breeder. I wanted to buy from a breeder because with her being my first dog, I was inexperienced and didn't think I could help a dog that may have problems. And from what I've heard, it's rare for Chis to be in rescue here in the UK (Idk where you are though).
She also didn't cost thousands (she was £700) and so far, thankfully, vets have only cost me £50 for injection bills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
809 Posts
My girl is a rescue. She was about 8 months old and she came potty trained and crate trained and was past most of the chewing stage. The foster mom had lived with her for several weeks so could tell me all about her temperament and personality. She also came spayed, microchipped and up to date on all her shots.

I love puppies but they are a lot of work. If you are looking to put in the work to first find the pup and then raise it then by all means go for it but a rescue can be a great option as well. Many young dogs end up in rescue through no fault of their own and have little to no "baggage". When I got Lilo I took her for a week's trial and during that week took her to the vet for a through check up which she passed with flying colors. Medical problems can crop up on a puppy as well as a rescue.

As far as temperament goes, even if you meet the parents and like them, you aren't buying them, you are buying a puppy and he can turn out different. A puppy is a "pig in a poke", you never really know what you're going to get.

Whichever way you go best of luck to you and your future dog!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,831 Posts
I would personally go with a rescue over a breeder, that's just where my heart is at. Rescue dogs may be some work at first, but they are so worth the effort. And rescues are also not necessarily "problem dogs". This is a common misconception. You would be shocked at the people that abandon wonderful, loving, dogs for the most basic of reasons. Moving, change of lifestyle, they peed in the house, they barked too much, they were too needy, etc. etc. There are a lot of wonderful chihuahua's in rescue.

Both of my chi's are rescues and they are the most loving wonderful little dogs. I'm certainly not against going to a breeder, but if you do, be certain you go with a breeder that is reputable, that health checks, knows their lines so forth. There are breeders out there that are just about the money and are pretty much akin to puppy mills. So definitely do your research. Whatever you do, do not buy from a pet store. Good luck with whatever you choose. Chihuahua's are wonderful dogs. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
I agree completely with Foggy. I'm a foster mom for a Chi rescue group, and I can attest to how rewarding it is to save these precious lives. True, some of my foster chis needed housebreaking, etc., but others have been nearly perfect and ready for immediate adoption to a forever home. One of my current fosters is such a doll, I can't figure out how anyone would dump such a lovely, loving, gorgeous little Chi cub into the shelter. When you work with a rescue that has a foster program, the Chis will have spent at least some time stabilizing in a loving home. The foster parent(s) should provide an honest evaluation--I always do. Thank you for considering a rescue Chi.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,016 Posts
Absolutely rescue !

I've done both, and it is hard to argue against a puppy, but argue against it !

By the way, your statement "but you have no idea what their personality is going to develop into, or their health history, which could easily catch up with me in vet bills" is not really accurate, and it's actually no more accurate for a rescue then it would be if you applied the same sentence to a puppy.

Not only is rescuing a noble effort, but considering where you are at it's a good alternative ( i don't mean geographically)

But do be sure THIS breed is what you want to spend the next 12- 18 years with before you take the plunge.

Yes it's cheaper to adopt, but emotionally it's much rougher for the rescue should you decide it's not working out.

I'm rambling and not making the specific point I want to -
You'll have the undying love and gratitude of one special pup and a whole bunch of humans if you do rescue !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Well Daisy was from a breeder. I wanted to buy from a breeder because with her being my first dog, I was inexperienced and didn't think I could help a dog that may have problems. And from what I've heard, it's rare for Chis to be in rescue here in the UK (Idk where you are though).
She also didn't cost thousands (she was £700) and so far, thankfully, vets have only cost me £50 for injection bills.
I'm in the U.S.
I've had a family dog before from a breeder, and she just a few little health kinks but we've worked them out:) Nothing real serious.
Thanks!! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
My girl is a rescue. She was about 8 months old and she came potty trained and crate trained and was past most of the chewing stage. The foster mom had lived with her for several weeks so could tell me all about her temperament and personality. She also came spayed, microchipped and up to date on all her shots.

I love puppies but they are a lot of work. If you are looking to put in the work to first find the pup and then raise it then by all means go for it but a rescue can be a great option as well. Many young dogs end up in rescue through no fault of their own and have little to no "baggage". When I got Lilo I took her for a week's trial and during that week took her to the vet for a through check up which she passed with flying colors. Medical problems can crop up on a puppy as well as a rescue.

As far as temperament goes, even if you meet the parents and like them, you aren't buying them, you are buying a puppy and he can turn out different. A puppy is a "pig in a poke", you never really know what you're going to get.

Whichever way you go best of luck to you and your future dog!
Thanks, I guess I never really thought about all the different backrounds rescue dogs can from. I immediately thought of "stray, unknown history." I didn't consider the fact that some dogs' owners had to move, lost their job, etc. My fault there.:rolleyes:

Thanks :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
RESCUE!

Zippy is a rescue. He is the first dog that I've ever owned (the first dog that I've even ever wanted to own), 10+ years old, and the best dog ever! He's lived in our house for not quite a year and I honestly don't know how we ever got along without him.

RESCUE! Save a life!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,206 Posts
All my pets, for many, many years now, have been rescues. Every dog my kids can remember growing up with, were dogs from rescue organizations. I feel very strongly about rescuing versus buying from a breeder.

Both my chis are rescues, Tango at 7 months, Jazz at 3 months. Pretty sure Tango came from a Pet Store originally, (which means backyard breeder almost certainly) and I know Jazz came from one. Tango spent most of his life in a crate because he lived with 2 pitbulls and 2 rotties and his owner was afraid they'd eat him. The lady who owned Jazz was going to put her to sleep because she decided to move and didn't want to pay a pet deposit. Like foggy said, dogs end up needing rescue for all kinds of reasons.

I enjoy the satisfaction of knowing that I've improved a dog's life, changed their future, perhaps even given them life (in Jazz's case that's certainly true.) Both dogs came to me with health problems. The Vet said that if Jazz's original owner had waited just a bit longer she wouldn't have had to put her down, that Jazz likely would have died from complications of the upper respiratory infection she had (one of several health situations she came to me with.)

Tango fared a bit better. He was undernourished, had an eye infection, and nasty coat issues....thin, patchy, scaly skin and lots of shedding. A change in his diet, to superior food, solved 90% of his problems, and some antibiotics the other 10%.

Both dogs are the picture of health now, and I aim to keep them that way. :D Yeah, they cost me money in vet bills, because I didn't go through a rescue organization who took care of all their health issues before they came to me. I had been looking in rescues, my local Humane Organization, even Animal Control, but none of the animals I found clicked. Both Tango and Jazz ended up with me through a series of chance encounters and coincidences that I simply couldn't ignore....I was meant to have both of them, and that was that!

I have never regretted my decision to take these dogs on, not for a minute!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,018 Posts
My little Audrey Lyn is from a breeder (my cousin) and she was the last little that my cousin bred. Her parents are AKC registered and quite adorable in my opinion. Audrey thankfully has had no vet bills, but has costed much money in shots and micro chip, spay. But that are all thing I wanted for her and I just want her to be happy and healthy always. Howver, I volunteer at my local Humane Society in the city I live in, I see many chis with amazing little temperaments. There are chis of all ages in shelters. I fell madly in love with one long haired 4 year old white female chi. She was just precious and melted my heart. If I could have I would have snatched her up. So I would highly suggest looking into shelters. Perhaps checking petfinder.com as well. But many times walking into the local shelters are ever more successful than just browsing online. I hope you are able to find a chi whether is be breeder or shelter rescue, that makes a wonderful pet and that you love as an addition to your family.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts
Honestly, my family has always rescued dogs, so I felt sort of guilty getting Teddy from a breeder. He was $650 to buy, but since I have him on a good diet (Orijen and Lotus/Weruva/Merrick, etc. plus some raw food thrown in occasionally), he has almost no health problems and our vet bills are inexpensive and infrequent. He did inherit slightly weak knees (a grade 1 patellar luxation, or "slipped kneecap" on both back legs), which his sire also has, but my vet doesn't think he will ever need surgery for it. But it just goes to show that not every breeder puppy will be perfectly healthy.

I know if I was going to get another dog I would DEFINITELY rescue, but I'd be keeping an eye out for a special dog to make a part of my family. Dogs from foster homes are great because the foster parent can tell you a lot about that dog's personality just from living with them.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top