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Discussion Starter #1
So, Reese and Jax are on Blue Buffalo grain-free kibble. Reese has had skin problems and allergies since we adopted him and now he's developed a bit of a weight problem. My step-mother feeds her dogs raw when they have any health issues and ive never quite undestood why she goes back to kibble once they are well. Right now, I've cut down to one kibble meal a day then chicken on the bone and livers as well as a raw egg. I am going to look for kidney tomorrow. Obviously Reese gets more than Jax and I am trying to determine exactly how much to feed. Jax is 3 lbs, tracking to be about 5 lbs at adulthood. Reese is 65 lbs and probably needs to be 55 lbs. Any advice is appreciated.
 

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I would just cut the kibble out completely. Best thing I ever did for Honey.
Izzy is still at the breeders and she told me the other day she does not feed kibble any more either, so Izzy will never know what kibble is :)
 

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Chicken on the bone is fine. I would not do liver or egg at this point. That is an almost surefire guarantee of diarrhea. Too rich for this beginning stage. Just do bone-in chicken for one meal a day. If you decide to go full out raw, then you can gradually add in other proteins, eggs, organs, etc.

Try and separate the kibble and the raw meals by at least 8 - 10 hours. Some people feel that they don't digest at the same rate and can cause problems if fed together.

Brody is 5 pounds, 2 years old, and eats about 3-4 ounces a day. (It used to be about 2 ounces but he was too lean so I have upped his portions). You want to start out at 2-3% of their adult body weight (or 10% of current weight for puppies) and then adjust up or down as needed.

I like to start with cornish hens, buy a one pound one, and then whack it up into about 8 pieces of meat/skin/bone. That gives you 8 pieces that weight approximately 2 ounces each. Feed through it and then start again. Cornish hen bones are easy to crunch up and digest. Chicken bones can be a bit much for a beginner, although chicken breast bone and backs are pretty easy. The wings and necks are over 50% bone and very little meat so save those for times when you need a bone heavy meal. You are eventually aiming for the ratio of 80% meat, 10% bone, and 10% organs but this is balance over time. A new raw dog should be on chicken only for at least a week or so before adding in other proteins. Organs are done last.

Reese could start with leg quarters of chickens. Be sure to buy unenhanced chicken, read the labels! NO more than 100mg of sodium per 4 ounces or you can expect diarrhea and/or itchies from all that added salt.

No liver, no kidney, no eggs, no veggies or fruits. Just plain old cornish hens and/or unenhanced chicken with bone to start. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank yo so much! The love the chicken. It seems like it could be very easy to overfeed, because they just stare at me after they've scarfed down their meals
 
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