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Hello all

Quick question.

Keeley is coming up to six months and I know she'll be in heat at some point, and I was discussing with hubby if I should have her spayed. He says if I spay her she'll get like a box :? but when I spayed my Pomeranian X back home, she was as slim as anything.

Hubby recons we should keep her as she is ... his logic is that we might want to be "grandparents" one day. But I guess I've never thought of breeding Keeley. She's like my widdle baby!!!

Any words of wisdom? She's due for her 6 month checkup soon and I'd like to discuss my plan with the vet.
 

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Hello! This was taking from Petplace.com -- there are a lot of health benefits to spaying but your husband is right to be concerned about weight gain. It sounds like it is something that can be controlled through diet, though.

Spaying – The Positive Side


Spaying removes the risk of pregnancy.

Pet overpopulation is a serious issue and by allowing your dog to have litters, you are adding to the problem. Finding homes for your new family additions is not as easy as you may think. Even if you choose to keep the puppies, you now have the additional cost of vaccines, parasite control, toys and food for several pets. In addition to costs, the health of the mother can be in jeopardy during delivery. Some new mothers can have serious complications delivering puppies and can even develop health problems during nursing. All these potential problems can be avoided by spaying your dog.


Spaying makes for a cleaner, calmer dog.

Without the drive to mate, your dog may be quieter and not prone to an incessant need to seek out a mate. The spayed dog no longer attracts males and their annoying advances and serenades. Dogs won’t have a bloody discharge for several days while they are in heat. Without proper protective products, the discharge can stain sofas, bedding and carpets. Spayed pets are also easier to get along with. They tend to be more gentle and affectionate.


Spaying keeps your dog healthier.

A final positive aspect of spaying your dog is that spayed pets tend to have fewer health problems. Spaying is the removal of the ovaries and uterus. Without these organs, ovarian cysts, uterine infections and cancer of the reproductive tract are no longer a concern. Studies have shown that dogs spayed before puberty have a significantly lower chance of developing breast cancer than unspayed dogs or dogs spayed later in life.

Spaying – The Negative Side


Spaying means sterilization.

Spaying will result in the sterilization of your dog, and she will no longer have the ability to become pregnant. If you wish to breed your dog, spaying should not be done.


Spaying may cause weight gain.

Some pets may gain weight after spaying. Unspayed animals typically have a strong mating desire and can expend a lot of energy seeking a mate and reproducing. Without this energy burden, your dog may eat the same amount but not burn off as many calories. Cutting back on her food can help reduce the weight gain but it is still something to be concerned about.


Spaying makes some dogs less active.

Pets that have been spayed tend to be less active. If a more sedentary dog is not for you, spaying may not be the best option.
 

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I had Buffy spayed when she was about 6 months old, she is now almost 3. She is a perfect weight, 4lbs.. I think if you watch their diet just like you do a chi that hasn't been spayed they will not gain excessive weight. Buffy eats twice a day, and a few treats in between. She still loves to run and play, and I am glad I don't have the mess of her bleeding if she wasn't spayed. I plan on getting Chico neutered soon too. Hope that helps.
 

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I have three spayed females. The two that have the deer body type are fit and trim, but the third is a cobby (shorter legs, rounder body) and she is overweight. I think the body type has a lot to do with it.
But I think that Mocha would have been overweight even if she had not been spayed.
I prefer spay for these females because I never have to worry about seasons, less messy.
I have 2 unspayed females and they are enough to worry about. It is only 3 weeks approximately every 6 months. But they are a long three weeks. Having to go out with them and they cannot be sure which is just the right place to go. I do have stray dogs around when they are in season. Even though I am a responsible pet owner and my dogs don't roam, other people are not. I am surprised at all of the dogs that are let wander at large, even though it is against an ordinance. :wave:
 

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Sweety

I think that you should definitely spay your baby. My pups Kirby and Kali are going to be 6 months on October 28th and they will also be spayed that day. Just like Boogaloo posted there are too many unwanted/euthanized dogs because of unwanted breeding. Think of it this way. Even if you breed your baby once and you sell the pups. You just contribute to more possibly breeding through your pups litter. The cycle never ends it just keeps going. I would say get the spaying done. It's the best solution.
 

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I agree definately have her spayed - I couldnt stand the thought of putting my little baby through pregnancy and child birth neither of mine have gained weight and if you read the thing about gaining weight which boogaloo posted it says that they will gain weight as they wont be mating as much :lol: plus once spayed i found they were much sweeter and a little bit more calmer and alot more loving - so this is a bonus too me , aslong as you feed the correct amount with not too many treats and regulare exercise she will stay in shape :wave:

good luck with your decision
 

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so is 6 months old the best time to have it done?? or can you do it sooner???

Let me know :)

Thanks,
Xavier32178
 

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Mine is getting it done right at 5 months old. I am so glad, because I remember when I had a toy poodle (she was only 6lbs.) the neighbor dogs would come over ALOT around my house and sniff around for her. There were some big dogs too, a little scary. I remember being suprised that these big dogs could smell my little dog so far away, plus my next door neighbor's dog would howl LOUDLY through the night for her. I took her at 5 years old to be spayed and because of her being older, she did gain weight. The Vet told me to expect this. So I think the earlier the better.
 

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some people say to have it done at 6 months and some say once they have had there first heat - i have always done my dogs at 6 months and never had any problems - they wont do it sooner as they are not mature enough :wave:
 
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