Chihuahua People Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
433 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We just finished our first chi meetup. There were only 5 or 6 of us and everyone was really nice but we're still being VERY polite and careful what we say so as not to offend anybody. One lady has a 6 or 7 pound male chi and she is set on getting a second one but determined that it only grow to 3 to 3 1/2 lbs. I really want to tell her that looking for a chi that small shes probably going to run into breeders who don't have the puppies best interests in mind and to educate her on so called teacups but I'm not sure how to do this without offending her. anyone have any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,323 Posts
Rachael had a good idea! :wink:

Other than that, I'm not sure. You can try telling her anyway but who knows how she'll take it. When I tell people about that, they look at me like they think I am a 'know it all'. :roll: Like I am changing the terms or something! :x

Maybe you could print out some info for her? From good breeders sites, that state that there is no such thing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,059 Posts
Just point out the facts...that the standard weight is between 3-6 and the Chihuahua Club of America does not recognize the term tea-cup, nor does the AKC

The Myth Of The Teacup Chihuahua

Sponsored by The Chihuahua Club of America

The official A.K.C. Breed Standard describes the Chihuahua as a small dog that comes in two varieties or coats types. The differences in coat type (the Long Coat or the Smooth Coat) is the only official description used to identify a difference within this breed. Our Standard does not categorize the Chihuahua by size.

For the purpose of showing and record keeping, the American Kennel Club includes the Chihuahua (along with 17 other breeds) in the Toy Group. Therefore, irrespective of their weight or physical stature, ALL Chihuahua registered with A.K.C. are considered to be a toy breed of dog.

As with all living things, there will be a size variance between individual dogs within this breed. Look within the human family - brothers and sisters will differ in height and in weight, as well as other physical attributes. They are described as humans, male or female, and there is seldom if ever a need to break the description down further. The same holds true in regard to the Chihuahua; they are Chihuahuas-Long Coat/Smooth Coat, Male/Female.

Unfortunately, the additional adjectives used to describe the size differences and physical appearances are many; and have been misused for so long they now seem legitimate. Tea-Cup, Pocket Size, Tiny Toy, Miniature or Standard - are just a few of the many tags and labels that have been attached to this breed over the years. The Chihuahua Club of America is concerned that these terms may be used to entice prospective buyers into thinking that puppies described in this way are of greater monetary value. They are not; the use of these terms is incorrect and misleading.

Occasionally, within a litter, there may be a puppy that is unusually small. That pup is a small Chihuahua and any other breakdown in description is not correct. To attach any of these additional labels to a particular pup is to misrepresent that animal as something that is rare or exceptional and causes a great deal of confusion among those new fanciers who are looking for a Chihuahua.

The Chihuahua Club of America does not endorse or condone the use of any of these terms and would caution the perspective puppy buyer not to be misled by them. We recognize that many Chihuahua fanciers do want the very small puppy. While they are adorable, and can be perfectly healthy, the buyer should be cautioned as to the extra care that may be required with regard to the general health and well-being.

The TEACUP puppy is, in reality, a premature puppy. Most females are bred on the ninth through the fifteenth day of their heat cycles. Eggs can be fertilized for up to 72 hours after any of these breeding's. Therefore, it is possible to have puppies conceived up to a week or so younger than the puppies first Conceived in a litter. However, when the first puppies conceived are mature and ready to be born, labor starts and all the puppies will be born, no matter when they were fertilized.

This explains why you have some bigger and some smaller puppies in a litter. There are no "runts" In a litter, merely younger puppies. These younger puppies may not be fully developed. Their problems may be hidden until later in puppy hood.

Some of the problems that may be encountered are heart or lung problem, luxating patella's, or hydrocephalic or "water" on the brain. Some of the smaller, yet just as serious, problems that may occur are hypoglycemia, (low blood sugar) or seizures.
You might be able to show them this article. I went to a chihuahua meetup where I live (not the one where I met up with other members from this site) and unfortunately there was a very ignorant woman there who was 'shocked' i didnt breed Ginger (ginger only weighs 3lbs) She was like "oh thats too bad u didnt breed her you could had made so much money on her pups since they would be teacups" She said this like I was stupid...like she was looking down on me for my choice.
I tried to explain that the term was made-up just for breeders to make more money and she got very huffy with me and just rolled her eyes...like I was some PETA member or something spitting my extreme views....*shake head* some people just wont listen...just do your best to educate and if they dont listen unfortunately there isnt much you can do.
I basically told her 'well i care more about my dogs health and happiness then making a few bucks" (she didnt like that very much).
I did however have a very pleasant conversation with the other people there who honistly didnt know that teacup chi's were just a breeders scam. :D
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top