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Discussion Starter #1
Zoey had her second set of shots on Friday by an exotic animal vet. My wife asked her about Zoey's mouth having enough room for all of her teeth. The regular vet had said it shouldn't be a problem but her muzzle is fairly short and she has a bit of an underbite. The exotic vet said that there's enough room for her teeth but decay is going to be a problem because her mouth is on the small side. She offered a vaccine that's supposed to kill the bacteria that causes the rot. Anyone ever heard of this? It doesn't seem possible for a vaccine to do that and if it did it would only be for a short while.
 

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I would pass, but I am very conservative. It's up to you, but definitely do some reading and then decide for yourself. Here's a snippet ....

The Porphyromonas (Periodontal) Vaccine

This vaccine represents the newest tool in the prevention of periodontal disease. It was released by Pfizer in early 2007 for use in dogs only, after nearly half a million test doses administered and studied. The targets here are the anaerobic bacteria responsible for bone destruction in advanced periodontal disease. There are hundreds of bacteria involved in periodontal disease but three species in particular are present in ¾ of cases: Porphyromonas denticanis, Porphyromonas salivosa, and Porphyromonas gulae. These are bone-eating anaerobic bacteria and vaccine against them helps to reduce bone loss in more severe cases of periodontal disease. The vaccine is NOT a replacement for other modes of home care and certainly does not prevent periodontal disease. It is given as an introductory series of two vaccines 3 weeks apart and annually thereafter. Ideally it is given when the mouth is healthy (i.e. a few weeks after cleaning or in younger patients). At this time it is not considered a “core” vaccine by the American Animal Hospital Association which means it is not felt to be a basic need for every dog, though many veterinary dentists dispute this and we may see in time that it becomes part of every dog’s basic immunization protocol. At the time of this writing, the duration of immunity from vaccination with this product has not been determined.
 

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Cookie has a SEVERE overbite. He looks like a parrot. The bottom half of his mouth is tiny, half the size of the top. He's had most of his teeth out over the years but that because he wouldn't let me brush them.

Just brush her theeth and that should be enough
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Interesting. It seems this is more of a preventative for disease than decay. I told my wife I really don't want her to have it because it's pretty easy to just keep up on oral care in the first place. She LOVES to chew so it seems like if we provide the right chewies we may not have to worry about decay at all. I finally broke down and bought a bully stick this morning. The thought of them is disgusting but if it means avoiding tooth problems and more vaccinations it's worth it.

I've also thought about feeding some raw foods and this seems like a good reason to do so. Would a wing or two a week do anything as far as her teeth or would we need to do more than that?
 

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Interesting. It seems this is more of a preventative for disease than decay. I told my wife I really don't want her to have it because it's pretty easy to just keep up on oral care in the first place. She LOVES to chew so it seems like if we provide the right chewies we may not have to worry about decay at all. I finally broke down and bought a bully stick this morning. The thought of them is disgusting but if it means avoiding tooth problems and more vaccinations it's worth it.

I've also thought about feeding some raw foods and this seems like a good reason to do so. Would a wing or two a week do anything as far as her teeth or would we need to do more than that?
You could certainly start out with a couple wings a week in place of a meal. Try it and see. Some people see a difference right away when they start with some raw foods. Bully sticks are good too. You are on the right track. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you so much. My wife doesn't like the idea of raw feeding but really, it doesn't seem like a big deal to do a few meals a week raw. I'll check out the raw feeding thread.

Right now I'm looking at a big display of natural chewies and I'm extremely confused. I'm getting another bully stick and a beef trachea but the bones are what's getting me. Are pork ribs okay? Or beef center bones? Beef tendons? Maybe I need to start a new thread. Lol
 

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Thank you so much. My wife doesn't like the idea of raw feeding but really, it doesn't seem like a big deal to do a few meals a week raw. I'll check out the raw feeding thread.

Right now I'm looking at a big display of natural chewies and I'm extremely confused. I'm getting another bully stick and a beef trachea but the bones are what's getting me. Are pork ribs okay? Or beef center bones? Beef tendons? Maybe I need to start a new thread. Lol
Bully sticks and tracheas are fine. Ribs, no they are cooked. The beef center bones, no. Tendons yes.

If they are a body part that is flexible and can be chewed and consumed such as bullysticks, tracheas, ears, tendons - they are fine. If they are a bone (and hoofs too), then no. Those are tooth breakers.

RAW ribs and other meaty bones - yes.

Oh, and if they have antlers - YES. They are great chews and softer than bone. They last a long time too.
 

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Yeah mine love to chew on a bully. They're really good for the teeth. You've only got to look at Brody's teeth to see raw is brilliant as well. I'd give some good chews and just brush them. I wouldn't give extra injections really.
 

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You could certainly start out with a couple wings a week in place of a meal. Try it and see. Some people see a difference right away when they start with some raw foods. Bully sticks are good too. You are on the right track. ;)
We do this with ours...they love it, and it does seem to help with teeth although Oakley has a teeny mouth too and is going to have to have a full dental at just over a year old so we can get ahead of all the tarter build up and get some teeth pulled to hopefully fix the problem before it becomes worse.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The bottom line is that I really want to avoid having teeth pulled due to disease if at all possible. Our Tiny was 2 1/2 pounds full-grown (she was overweight, for her size, even) and had an itty-bitty mouth. She had to have half of her adult teeth pulled as soon as they came in to make room for the rest. Unfortunately we had to have the rest pulled later because they just rotted out. She wouldn't chew on anything, though, partly because her entire mouth was just absolutely minuscule. Zoey's going to be at least two times bigger than Tiny was and her snout isn't nearly as small proportionally. She's 2 pounds at 10 weeks and only an inch or so shorter than Bean is at 11 months. I'm also switching them to Wellness puppy today and I'm hoping that actually having to chew her food as opposed to just swallowing the old food will help too.

We're going to check and see if it's a possibility to do the vaccine after Zoey's first year if all else fails. We'll try some raw and find stuff she really likes to chew on. She's not very interested in the bully or trachea I got but she seems to do most of her chewing later in the day so we'll see.
 
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