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For me personally the thing that I did wrong at first was that I assumed I
could just "eye" their portions. Once I purchased a good scale I realized
I was very off. Also I think it's important to be able to weigh your dog as
well, otherwise they can lose/gain weight without you knowing it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm still trying to figure out what a good portion size is. I've been feeding 2oz at each meal and she's 5.3 lbs.
 

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I think her portion not only depends on her weight but also on her activity level.
Again, if you can weigh her you will know right away if she's losing weight with
what you are feeding her now.

I would assume she could have a little more than that. Both of mine are right
around 4 pounds and I keep them fairly active with at least one walk a day
and they go out to romp around in the yard several times a day. They each
get around 3-3.6 oz a day.
 

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A few of mine ...

Do not overfeed. Overfeeding causes weight gain which is hard on the joints. It can also cause loose stools.

Do not feed weight bearing bones. Use those marrow bones you see at the grocery store at your own risk. They can break teeth. Stick to chicken or cornish hens for your bone content. The ends of ribs are edible as well.

Do not feed too much bone. Watch stools. If they are white and chalky or crumbly, back off on the bone and feed more meat. Remember, bone is only about 10% of the diet. It's really easy to overdo.

Do not feed a diet based on only chicken. Make the majority of your raw diet red meats. They have a better nutritional profile than poultry.

Do not feed wild boar, bear, opposum, raccoon. They all contain parasites, especially raccoon which contains a roundworm that is almost impossible to eradicate.

Do not feed huge chunks of fat. I leave the skin on chicken and cornish hens and most of the marbling fat on pork and beef. Fat is necessary for energy and dogs don't get clogged arteries like humans do. ;) But I don't feed marrow or huge chunks of fat.

Do not feed enhanced meats. Read the labels on ALL meat you buy. Manufacturers are sneaky. They will plump up their meats with a 'solution' which is salt water. It adds weight and tenderness. Dogs don't do well with salt. The label should be 100mg of sodium or less per 4 ounce serving.

Finally, do not stress! :) It is balance over time. A variety of meats, some bone, a little bit of organ - done. Don't make it harder and more complicated than it should be. If you can feed your family a balanced diet, you can certainly feed your dog.
 

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^"Like."

1. Don't forget to shop the bargains if cost is a factor for you... there are a lot of rich meats (like beef or pork heart if you can find it!!) that are very inexpensive per pound. They are a big staple in this house. Rich heart, chicken necks, lab kidney, beef liver.. balanced over a week in the right ratios. Routine raw treats or snacks (we reduce the meal by a bit to make up for the extra calories) to add variety sometimes are chicken gizzards; pig ears cut into strips and frozen, chicken feet. ) I want to get a dehydrator for the new house so I can make more of my own treats and chicken strips!.

2. Don't feed the organ too early. We usually keep the dogs on a fairly boney meal, alternated with a meat meal, daily for about 2 weeks before giving organ for the first time. If you're monitoring poops you'll be able to sneak it in one meal and it should go smoothly! We only feed organ twice a week... liver one day and kidney on the other. They are fed a pretty bone-heavy meal prior.
 
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