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Discussion Starter #1
He has a small patch on one leg which is very dry and flakey. It doesn't irritate him and that's the only place it is. I'd like to get some sort of cream to apply there but I'm not sure of any dog creams on the market.

Anyone know what I can get for him? Thanks
 

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Are you giving him any fish oil supplements? That will help if it is just dry from the cold
Winter season. If it's a skin condition, maybe the Vet should look to see if it needs antibiotic cream.
Hope it gets better soon :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Are you giving him any fish oil supplements? That will help if it is just dry from the cold
Winter season. If it's a skin condition, maybe the Vet should look to see if it needs antibiotic cream.
Hope it gets better soon :)
I used to give them salmon oil but I stopped. I've just found a cream for dry skin online so I'll give that a go.
 

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if the cream doesnt work out, go see your vet or try yumega - it makes there skin and coat really healthy
 

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Have a wonderful cream for my sheltie,who gets a bad paw in snow and dampness it's called "Skin -eze " made by johnsons,if it looks red i put that on and next day you can see it getting better.best thing i have ever found for skin and i have tried loads,think you can get it from big petshops "Pets at home,or order it on line
 

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Have a wonderful cream for my sheltie,who gets a bad paw in snow and dampness it's called "Skin -eze " made by johnsons,if it looks red i put that on and next day you can see it getting better.best thing i have ever found for skin and i have tried loads,think you can get it from big petshops "Pets at home,or order it on line
i used to use skin - eze on my old cavalier (she had dry skin and it worked really well)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Have a wonderful cream for my sheltie,who gets a bad paw in snow and dampness it's called "Skin -eze " made by johnsons,if it looks red i put that on and next day you can see it getting better.best thing i have ever found for skin and i have tried loads,think you can get it from big petshops "Pets at home,or order it on line
Thanks, I'm gonna look for that now.
 

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Hope it does the trick,as i said i have spent a fortune on different creams and lotions and this really works,always got a tub in the cupboard,think i'll try it next time probably better than our creams !
 

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I've heard that coconut oil is FANTASTIC for so many things for humans and animals including dry itchy skin. The good stuff is expensive but i havent seen anyone who says the oil hasnt helped in one way or another. Here is an article that was found and posted on another forum i am on. IF you do decide to get some try to stick to the organic type, it seems to work better.

THe following is an exert from an article written by CJ Puotinen. If you would like the full article PM me and i'll send the link as it was too large to post here.



“Virgin” or unrefined, this healthy oil has multiple benefits for you and your dog.


According to its advocates, when taken internally, coconut oil:

• Reduces the risk of cancer and other degenerative conditions

• Improves cholesterol levels and helps fight heart disease

• Improves digestion and nutrient absorption

• Heals digestive disorders like Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcers, and colitis

• Contains powerful antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal agents that prevent infection and disease

• Relieves arthritis

• Prevents and treats yeast and fungal infections, including thrush and candidiasis

• Prevents and treats viral infections, including herpes, measles, and the flu

• Helps balance the body’s metabolism and hormones

• Promotes normal thyroid function

• Helps prevent or control diabetes

• Rejuvenates the skin and protects against skin cancer, age spots, acne, and other blemishes

• Helps prevent osteoporosis

• Reduces allergic reactions

• Supplies fewer calories than other fats.

Applied topically, its boosters say that coconut oil also does the following:

• Disinfects cuts

• Promotes wound healing

• Improves skin health and hair condition

• Deodorizes whatever it touches (some people brush their teeth with it or use it as an underarm deodorant)

• Clears up warts, moles, psoriasis, eczema, dandruff, precancerous lesions, athlete’s foot, jock itch, diaper rash, ringworm, vaginal yeast infections, and toenail fungus.

All of this is excellent news for people and their dogs, for most of coconut oil’s human benefits are shared by canines. And dogs love the taste, which makes feeding coconut oil and other coconut products easy and pleasant.

Get the right type
Coconut oil is produced in Thailand, Fiji, the Philippines, Brazil, Indonesia, India, Sri Lanka, Jamaica, Hawaii, Mexico, the Solomon Islands, Belize, Samoa, and other countries around the world. Most health food stores carry at least one or two brands, and many retailers sell coconut oil online or by mail.

There are two main types of coconut oil.

Unrefined or “virgin” coconut oil, which is made from fresh coconuts, has culinary and health experts excited. Pressed by hand using traditional methods or manufactured in state-of-the-art factories, virgin coconut oil retains most of the nutrients found in fresh coconut.


Refined coconut oil can cost as little as $3 for a 16-ounce (one-pint) jar, while the same amount of virgin organic coconut oil can cost $18 or more. Several brands are available in larger sizes, including gallon tubs, which lowers their per-ounce cost considerably. Assuming the oil is correctly labeled and properly prepared, virgin organic coconut oil in glass rather than plastic is the favorite of most experts.

Good-quality oil is colorless when liquid and pure white when solid, never yellow or pink, and it should not contain any residue or have an “off” or rancid odor. “Many people complain that coconut oil makes their throat feel scratchy or causes a burning sensation,” says Bruce Fife, ND, who has written several books about coconut oil. “The catch in the throat is a sign of poor quality. Some of these oils have a roasted or smoky flavor and aroma, which is another indication of poor quality, as it comes from smoke that contaminates the oil during heat processing.”

“The energy boost you get from coconut oil is not like the kick you get from caffeine,” says Dr. Fife. “It gently elevates the metabolism, provides a higher level of energy and vitality, protects you from illness, and speeds healing. In dogs, the medium-chain fatty acids in coconut oil balance the thyroid, helping overweight dogs lose weight and helping sedentary dogs feel energetic. As a bonus, coconut oil improves any dog’s skin and coat, improves digestion, and reduces allergic reactions.”

One good candidate for supplementation is the thick-coated dog who is often greasy or smelly. Many of these “stinkers” have freshened up when receiving a little coconut oil daily. Just start out with a low dosage (perhaps just a dab) and increase slowly.
Dosing dogs
No one has tested coconut oil’s effect on dogs in clinical trials, but the anecdotal evidence is impressive. Reports published on Internet forums describe how overweight dogs become lean and energetic soon after they begin eating coconut oil, or their shabby-looking coats become sleek and glossy, and dogs with arthritis or ligament problems grow stronger and more lively. Even some serious diseases have responded. In one case, a Doberman Pinscher with severe Wobblers made a dramatic recovery in less than a week while taking coconut oil.

Other reports involve itchy skin, cuts, wounds, and ear problems. Dogs with flea allergies, contact dermatitis, or other allergic reactions typically stop scratching soon after coconut oil is added to their food, and dogs treated topically for bites, stings, ear mites, ear infections, cuts, or wounds recover quickly. One dog was stung by a bee, causing her mouth to swell. An hour after her owner applied coconut oil to the sting and gave her a tablespoon to swallow, the swelling disappeared and the dog was herself again.

Smell you later!
The most enthusiastic reports describe coconut oil’s deodorizing effects.

Bob Ansley in Shallotte, North Carolina, started feeding his “incredibly smelly” black Lab, Smokey Joe, the coconut oil he drains from his wok after frying eggs, sausages, and other foods.

“Joe’s coat shined up,” says Ansley, “but the real surprise was that he stopped stinking. He has always smelled really bad, and bathing was a waste of time. For years when I petted him, I had to hold my hands away from my clothes and go wash my hands soon and thoroughly. My wife and kids wouldn’t touch him. Now I can pet him and rub him like he craves without having to run and wash up. The stench is gone and we didn’t even change his bedding. I’m pretty amazed. The cure was cheap, too!”

Gillmore also reports that dogs who receive coconut oil stop itching and scratching and their skin clears up. “Their coats really shine after they have been on it for a while. Skin tags and moles disappear after a month or two. Their digestion improves. And they don’t have a doggie odor – the coconut oil even takes away bad breath.”

Gillmore suggests that the best way to give coconut oil is in small doses throughout the day, “a spoonful here or there depending on the dog’s weight.” She also says that she has not yet met a dog who does not like the oil – “They usually lap it right up,” she says. “Some folks fry eggs in it and make a little extra for their dogs, or they put some in leftover oatmeal or add it to the dog’s dinner, but many give it straight off the spoon.”

Gillmore concludes, “I can’t say enough about how coconut oil helps animals. During the last eight years, I’ve seen over a hundred dogs improve in all kinds of ways because of coconut oil. I’ve even had people give it to their pet snakes and birds!”

How to administer
For convenient application, store coconut oil in both a glass eyedropper bottle and a small jar. During cold weather, these containers are easy to warm in hot water so that the oil quickly melts.

Use the eyedropper to apply coconut oil to ears, cuts, wounds, mouth sores, and other targeted areas, including your dog’s toothbrush.

Use the small jar to apply coconut oil to larger areas, such as cracked paw pads. Coconut oil is not fast-drying, so use a towel or tissue to remove excess oil as needed. The main challenge with coconut oil’s topical application is that dogs love the taste and immediately lick it off. To give coconut oil a chance to disinfect wounds and speed healing, cover the wound with a towel for a few minutes, or distract the dog long enough for at least some of the oil to be absorbed.


Coconut oil is also an excellent massage oil and carrier oil for use with medicinal herbs and aromatherapy. Any of the essential oils mentioned in “Essential Information” (January 2005) can be diluted in coconut oil for safe, effective canine application, and coconut oil is a perfect base for the herbal salves and oils described in “Savvy Salves” (August 2005).

In addition to lubricating the skin and joints, coconut oil acts as a natural preservative, is exceptionally stable, has a long shelf life, does not require refrigeration, and is such a powerful disinfectant that it reduces the need for germ-killing essential oils in aromatherapy blends designed to fight infection.

Important to start slooooow
Solid or liquid coconut oil can be added to food at any meal or given between meals. The optimum dose for dogs is about 1 teaspoon per 10 pounds of body weight daily, or 1 tablespoon per 30 pounds. These are general guidelines, as some dogs need less and others more.

Coconut oil isn’t the only coconut product that’s good for dogs. Fresh or dried coconut is an excellent source of dietary fiber, and dogs enjoy and benefit from the same coconut flakes, coconut flour, coconut cream, coconut milk, shredded coconut, and coconut spreads used by their human companions. Just be sure the products are unsweetened and free from chemical preservatives.


This summer i will be stocking up on coconut oil.
 

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i use that yumega oil with Lexie. its worked wonderd on her dry skin. i spent weeks concealing it on her food only to leave the measuring cup on the side one day, that cat knocked it off and Lexie licked it clean!!! apparently she loves the taste anyway! typical.

Has cleared her skin up in about 3 weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I've heard that coconut oil is FANTASTIC for so many things for humans and animals including dry itchy skin. The good stuff is expensive but i havent seen anyone who says the oil hasnt helped in one way or another. Here is an article that was found and posted on another forum i am on. IF you do decide to get some try to stick to the organic type, it seems to work better.

THe following is an exert from an article written by CJ Puotinen. If you would like the full article PM me and i'll send the link as it was too large to post here.



“Virgin” or unrefined, this healthy oil has multiple benefits for you and your dog.


According to its advocates, when taken internally, coconut oil:

• Reduces the risk of cancer and other degenerative conditions

• Improves cholesterol levels and helps fight heart disease

• Improves digestion and nutrient absorption

• Heals digestive disorders like Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcers, and colitis

• Contains powerful antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal agents that prevent infection and disease

• Relieves arthritis

• Prevents and treats yeast and fungal infections, including thrush and candidiasis

• Prevents and treats viral infections, including herpes, measles, and the flu

• Helps balance the body’s metabolism and hormones

• Promotes normal thyroid function

• Helps prevent or control diabetes

• Rejuvenates the skin and protects against skin cancer, age spots, acne, and other blemishes

• Helps prevent osteoporosis

• Reduces allergic reactions

• Supplies fewer calories than other fats.

Applied topically, its boosters say that coconut oil also does the following:

• Disinfects cuts

• Promotes wound healing

• Improves skin health and hair condition

• Deodorizes whatever it touches (some people brush their teeth with it or use it as an underarm deodorant)

• Clears up warts, moles, psoriasis, eczema, dandruff, precancerous lesions, athlete’s foot, jock itch, diaper rash, ringworm, vaginal yeast infections, and toenail fungus.

All of this is excellent news for people and their dogs, for most of coconut oil’s human benefits are shared by canines. And dogs love the taste, which makes feeding coconut oil and other coconut products easy and pleasant.

Get the right type
Coconut oil is produced in Thailand, Fiji, the Philippines, Brazil, Indonesia, India, Sri Lanka, Jamaica, Hawaii, Mexico, the Solomon Islands, Belize, Samoa, and other countries around the world. Most health food stores carry at least one or two brands, and many retailers sell coconut oil online or by mail.

There are two main types of coconut oil.

Unrefined or “virgin” coconut oil, which is made from fresh coconuts, has culinary and health experts excited. Pressed by hand using traditional methods or manufactured in state-of-the-art factories, virgin coconut oil retains most of the nutrients found in fresh coconut.


Refined coconut oil can cost as little as $3 for a 16-ounce (one-pint) jar, while the same amount of virgin organic coconut oil can cost $18 or more. Several brands are available in larger sizes, including gallon tubs, which lowers their per-ounce cost considerably. Assuming the oil is correctly labeled and properly prepared, virgin organic coconut oil in glass rather than plastic is the favorite of most experts.

Good-quality oil is colorless when liquid and pure white when solid, never yellow or pink, and it should not contain any residue or have an “off” or rancid odor. “Many people complain that coconut oil makes their throat feel scratchy or causes a burning sensation,” says Bruce Fife, ND, who has written several books about coconut oil. “The catch in the throat is a sign of poor quality. Some of these oils have a roasted or smoky flavor and aroma, which is another indication of poor quality, as it comes from smoke that contaminates the oil during heat processing.”

“The energy boost you get from coconut oil is not like the kick you get from caffeine,” says Dr. Fife. “It gently elevates the metabolism, provides a higher level of energy and vitality, protects you from illness, and speeds healing. In dogs, the medium-chain fatty acids in coconut oil balance the thyroid, helping overweight dogs lose weight and helping sedentary dogs feel energetic. As a bonus, coconut oil improves any dog’s skin and coat, improves digestion, and reduces allergic reactions.”

One good candidate for supplementation is the thick-coated dog who is often greasy or smelly. Many of these “stinkers” have freshened up when receiving a little coconut oil daily. Just start out with a low dosage (perhaps just a dab) and increase slowly.
Dosing dogs
No one has tested coconut oil’s effect on dogs in clinical trials, but the anecdotal evidence is impressive. Reports published on Internet forums describe how overweight dogs become lean and energetic soon after they begin eating coconut oil, or their shabby-looking coats become sleek and glossy, and dogs with arthritis or ligament problems grow stronger and more lively. Even some serious diseases have responded. In one case, a Doberman Pinscher with severe Wobblers made a dramatic recovery in less than a week while taking coconut oil.

Other reports involve itchy skin, cuts, wounds, and ear problems. Dogs with flea allergies, contact dermatitis, or other allergic reactions typically stop scratching soon after coconut oil is added to their food, and dogs treated topically for bites, stings, ear mites, ear infections, cuts, or wounds recover quickly. One dog was stung by a bee, causing her mouth to swell. An hour after her owner applied coconut oil to the sting and gave her a tablespoon to swallow, the swelling disappeared and the dog was herself again.

Smell you later!
The most enthusiastic reports describe coconut oil’s deodorizing effects.

Bob Ansley in Shallotte, North Carolina, started feeding his “incredibly smelly” black Lab, Smokey Joe, the coconut oil he drains from his wok after frying eggs, sausages, and other foods.

“Joe’s coat shined up,” says Ansley, “but the real surprise was that he stopped stinking. He has always smelled really bad, and bathing was a waste of time. For years when I petted him, I had to hold my hands away from my clothes and go wash my hands soon and thoroughly. My wife and kids wouldn’t touch him. Now I can pet him and rub him like he craves without having to run and wash up. The stench is gone and we didn’t even change his bedding. I’m pretty amazed. The cure was cheap, too!”

Gillmore also reports that dogs who receive coconut oil stop itching and scratching and their skin clears up. “Their coats really shine after they have been on it for a while. Skin tags and moles disappear after a month or two. Their digestion improves. And they don’t have a doggie odor – the coconut oil even takes away bad breath.”

Gillmore suggests that the best way to give coconut oil is in small doses throughout the day, “a spoonful here or there depending on the dog’s weight.” She also says that she has not yet met a dog who does not like the oil – “They usually lap it right up,” she says. “Some folks fry eggs in it and make a little extra for their dogs, or they put some in leftover oatmeal or add it to the dog’s dinner, but many give it straight off the spoon.”

Gillmore concludes, “I can’t say enough about how coconut oil helps animals. During the last eight years, I’ve seen over a hundred dogs improve in all kinds of ways because of coconut oil. I’ve even had people give it to their pet snakes and birds!”

How to administer
For convenient application, store coconut oil in both a glass eyedropper bottle and a small jar. During cold weather, these containers are easy to warm in hot water so that the oil quickly melts.

Use the eyedropper to apply coconut oil to ears, cuts, wounds, mouth sores, and other targeted areas, including your dog’s toothbrush.

Use the small jar to apply coconut oil to larger areas, such as cracked paw pads. Coconut oil is not fast-drying, so use a towel or tissue to remove excess oil as needed. The main challenge with coconut oil’s topical application is that dogs love the taste and immediately lick it off. To give coconut oil a chance to disinfect wounds and speed healing, cover the wound with a towel for a few minutes, or distract the dog long enough for at least some of the oil to be absorbed.


Coconut oil is also an excellent massage oil and carrier oil for use with medicinal herbs and aromatherapy. Any of the essential oils mentioned in “Essential Information” (January 2005) can be diluted in coconut oil for safe, effective canine application, and coconut oil is a perfect base for the herbal salves and oils described in “Savvy Salves” (August 2005).

In addition to lubricating the skin and joints, coconut oil acts as a natural preservative, is exceptionally stable, has a long shelf life, does not require refrigeration, and is such a powerful disinfectant that it reduces the need for germ-killing essential oils in aromatherapy blends designed to fight infection.

Important to start slooooow
Solid or liquid coconut oil can be added to food at any meal or given between meals. The optimum dose for dogs is about 1 teaspoon per 10 pounds of body weight daily, or 1 tablespoon per 30 pounds. These are general guidelines, as some dogs need less and others more.

Coconut oil isn’t the only coconut product that’s good for dogs. Fresh or dried coconut is an excellent source of dietary fiber, and dogs enjoy and benefit from the same coconut flakes, coconut flour, coconut cream, coconut milk, shredded coconut, and coconut spreads used by their human companions. Just be sure the products are unsweetened and free from chemical preservatives.


This summer i will be stocking up on coconut oil.
I actually have a big bottle of coconut oil
 
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