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I have a 7 week old chi, and I would like to start teaching her some basic manners (clicker means, sit, easy stuff like that) but I can't find treats that motivate her! She's so easily distracted, and seems to have such a hard time eating anything.


What do you guys use for training your chis?
 

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I have a 7 week old chi, and I would like to start teaching her some basic manners (clicker means, sit, easy stuff like that) but I can't find treats that motivate her! She's so easily distracted, and seems to have such a hard time eating anything.





What do you guys use for training your chis?

With training treats it's so important to find treats that your dogs likes. That way he or she is super excited about getting their treat after a command. I've used purebites freeze dried treats, also some yogurt treats from my local boutique, and also any kind of grain free cookies. I give them bullystic chews for dental health.


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Mine love shredded carrots. I buy a bag of them already shredded for my salads each week. This also provides a very cheap, low cal treat. They also love green beans and yellow squash.
 

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Thanks for all the suggestions guys! I'm gonna boil some chicken tonight and see how it goes. If that doesn't do it, it's off to petsmart haha.
 

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I was going to suggest boiled chicken, it is not bad for them so when you are doing a lot of training with a puppy it works well. If your puppy likes it go for that, you can always boil a lot then freeze it so you always have some on hand, just pop a piece in the microwave when you want to use it.
As far as commercial treats right now all my dogs are crazy for Stella & Chewys carnivore crunch, it is freeze dried and the nuggets are small but also easy to break up for little training bits and I like the ingredients. At agility class we have started calling it dog crack!
 

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Just discovered that mine will do almost anything for a drop of egg yolk! Cheap & healthy.
 

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Home made inexpensive non greasy dog training treats

For an inexpensive non greasy homemade training treat:

Cut up an entire package of hot dogs into pea sized pieces.
Place hot dogs on a plate lined with paper towels in one layer, cover them as well.
Microwave for 10 minutes, yes, ten minutes
Let cool
Put into plastic baggy

This is less expensive than dog treats (i.e. I can buy fresh salmon for myself a lot less than one bag of doggy salmon treats!)

Hope this helps!
 

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I make dehydrated liver treats. Nothing special added, though some people sprinkle them with garlic. My dogs and cats beg for them!

Lady wolf, why do you microwave the hotdog pieces like that?
 

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Hard boiled egg yolk is the million treat here, followed by cheese & raw meat bites. Dehydrated pure liver is good, but not like the above 3. He will do Anything for a drop of egg yolk!
 

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I never thought hotdogs were safe for dogs. I found an article that totally makes sense on this subject. My latest chi was a very picky eater, so my breeder gave her hotdogs, as it was one of the only things she would eat. Her skin and coat were terribly dry when I got her. I've had her a while now, and her coat looks so much healthier now that she's on a better diet. I now feed mainly freeze dried raw treats. They are great training treats as well.

Can dogs eat hot dogs?
April 5th, 2013 frankom



Yes, dogs can eat hot dogs in small quantities.
The main ingredients of hot dogs are meat such as pork, beef, chicken or turkey. Dogs like eating hot dogs, probably because they’re made of meat. A normal hot dog contains about 300 calories and 18.5 grams of fat, three times then chicken. Hot dogs are high in calories and fat, and would result in obesity, so dogs can’t eat too much.
All hot dogs contain the flavorings like salt. High sodium intake is bad for dog’s skin and coat, and can cause shedding coat. More specifically, don’t feed some hot dogs which contain garlic and paprika because they are harmful to dog’s health. In addition, most of the hot dogs are added preservatives such as sodium nitrite which would increase the risk of cancer. Research shows eating a hot dog every day can increase dog’s risk of colorectal cancer by 21 percent.
If you just feed dogs with a hot dog occasionally, that’s safe. Large amounts of hot dogs are unhealthy for dogs but not fatal, they can cause diarrhea, digestive problems and obesity.
Although hot dogs are pre-cooked, they can be eaten without cooking. You’d better heat them before feeding, because hot dogs may have the bacteria and cooking make them safer to eat.
In conclusion, hot dogs aren’t health food for dogs, but dogs like them. There is no problem if you occasionally feed small amounts. You could chop them into small pieces, and make them as training treats for dogs.
 

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I was going to suggest boiled chicken, it is not bad for them so when you are doing a lot of training with a puppy it works well. If your puppy likes it go for that, you can always boil a lot then freeze it so you always have some on hand, just pop a piece in the microwave when you want to use it.

As far as commercial treats right now all my dogs are crazy for Stella & Chewys carnivore crunch, it is freeze dried and the nuggets are small but also easy to break up for little training bits and I like the ingredients. At agility class we have started calling it dog crack!

Love the Stella and Chewy's carnivore crunch. These are the main treats we use. And my crew loves them! We've tried most flavors. Today I bought Stella's freeze dried tantalizing turkey meal mixers. It's new. It's already portioned out. However I'm still learning how much to feed. As we are used to using patties.
 

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Can dogs eat hot dogs?
April 5th, 2013 frankom



Yes, dogs can eat hot dogs in small quantities.
The main ingredients of hot dogs are meat such as pork, beef, chicken or turkey. Dogs like eating hot dogs, probably because they’re made of meat. A normal hot dog contains about 300 calories and 18.5 grams of fat, three times then chicken. Hot dogs are high in calories and fat, and would result in obesity, so dogs can’t eat too much.
All hot dogs contain the flavorings like salt. High sodium intake is bad for dog’s skin and coat, and can cause shedding coat. More specifically, don’t feed some hot dogs which contain garlic and paprika because they are harmful to dog’s health. In addition, most of the hot dogs are added preservatives such as sodium nitrite which would increase the risk of cancer. Research shows eating a hot dog every day can increase dog’s risk of colorectal cancer by 21 percent.
If you just feed dogs with a hot dog occasionally, that’s safe. Large amounts of hot dogs are unhealthy for dogs but not fatal, they can cause diarrhea, digestive problems and obesity.
Although hot dogs are pre-cooked, they can be eaten without cooking. You’d better heat them before feeding, because hot dogs may have the bacteria and cooking make them safer to eat.
In conclusion, hot dogs aren’t health food for dogs, but dogs like them. There is no problem if you occasionally feed small amounts. You could chop them into small pieces, and make them as training treats for dogs.
I totally agree hot dogs are certainly not the healthiest choice! For when you might need a high value occasional treat I guess they could be ok, but not every day for sure. Personally because of the high amount of salt I would not use hot dogs with my crew. I just wanted to point out that the garlic thing is not really a worry though. The study where everyone pulls the "garlic is bad" stats fed dogs (lab beagles) HUGE amounts of garlic. To have any long term effects a dog would have to eat several heads of garlic a day for many days. In that quantity most things are bad! Garlic can be a good additive for treats for the taste and has many health benefits if used in small amounts. Plenty of bad other things are in hot dogs though, even if you can find one without preservatives or artificial anything they are always, always full of salt.
 

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I mostly use her food ZP as treats she thinks it different lol, I just keep in different bag some and just refill.
but I do give her other at times, grain free mostly meat treats like Buddy Biscuits beef she can have chicken. .

Soft & Delicious, Naturally!

The soft texture of these mouth-watering treats makes them perfect for our four-legged friends who prefer a soft treat. We packed them with flavor, but left out all the nasty preservatives commonly found in other soft treats, so you’ll love them as much as your dog does.

Buddy Biscuits
Made with natural ingredients
Great for all dogs, even those with allergies or sensitivities
Highly palatable & easy to chew
Perfect for older dogs
No artificial colors, flavors, or preservatives
Free of corn & soy
Low fat options available
Resealable bag keeps freshness in
Made in USA
Seven delicious flavors
Available in 6 oz. resealable bags
 

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I totally agree hot dogs are certainly not the healthiest choice! For when you might need a high value occasional treat I guess they could be ok, but not every day for sure. Personally because of the high amount of salt I would not use hot dogs with my crew. I just wanted to point out that the garlic thing is not really a worry though. The study where everyone pulls the "garlic is bad" stats fed dogs (lab beagles) HUGE amounts of garlic. To have any long term effects a dog would have to eat several heads of garlic a day for many days. In that quantity most things are bad! Garlic can be a good additive for treats for the taste and has many health benefits if used in small amounts. Plenty of bad other things are in hot dogs though, even if you can find one without preservatives or artificial anything they are always, always full of salt.

I totally agree with you on the sodium thing. I too would never feed them to my crew for any reason. Also the nitrite thing raises a brow. 21% is a relatively high risk, enough for me to continue to stay away from hotdogs in general. I personally don't care for them even for myself.
 
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